Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

peteski

Members
  • Posts

    7,837
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by peteski

  1. i good magnifier is the answer.  Optivisor is just such instrument (other cheaper ones aren't as good - you get what you paid for).  My eyesight isn't what it used to be 20 years ago and without the Optivisor I would be lost (with models of any scale).  But with the Optivisor I can build some really small models.  But I do have to fess up that on that model I also used my stereo-microscope. ;)

     

     

    2019Wisniewski.JPG

  2. Coil sits wherever the owner installed it (since it is not a factory stock setup). Some sit on the engine,next to the distributor, others on the firewall.  You could mount it on the inner fender if you wish.  There is no single correct location. But I would mount it reasonably close to where the distributor is located (to minimize the length of wire run). Now if this was a factory stock model then the coil would have to be mounted in a prototypical accurate location.

  3. Like Art, I exclusively use the BSI accelerator (applied with micro-brush or a wooden toothpick - never sprayed).  Most other accelerator brands are either very stinky, contain acetone or other solvents which attach styrene and paints, or they work too fast (bubbling up the CA glue as it sets).

    I use more than half a dozen of various adhesives - as far as just the CA goes, I use the extra thick, regular and super-thin. Usually BIS brand, but I have used others too. But I would really be lost without the super-thin CA! 

  4. Firstly I am sooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo jealous I missed out on this on ebay ( I had 150 pound to spend ) it went for 76 quid but I missed it but 7 minuets ) the reason I am pis-+@ is I built this as a teenager and even if I say so it was the best model I ever made. You say it has been released as other makes could you enlighten me, will deffo be watching this.

    Be patient - you'll eventually find one. They do show up from time to time on eBay.  I'm in USA and I got one from UK several years ago (on eBay).  The shipping cost was a killer!  I still have an automatic eBay search for these so I do see them show up on eBay from time to time. I seen about 3 or 4 of them listed in the last few months.

    UPDATE:  I just got notified about 2 of these listed on eBay: look for items 252151788166 and 291604894209.

    Harry: that is going to be another awesome build!

  5. I have over 50 nail polish colors for my model car builds. The info on the bottles doesn't give any clue as to what type of paint is inside (nitrocellulose, acrylics or whatever else is in the bottle).  I go by smell! :D  Seriously, I usually use an ordinary lacquer thinner from a hardware store (I use the SCL brand).  Sometimes I use a medium temperature reducer from PPG. Either one works fine to think the nail polishes I have used so far.

    Here is my latest build using a nail polish.

    Bottle01_zps25474a88.jpg

  6. A couple of people have described how it's much easier to cut the tooling so that the resulting plastic part comes out of the mold with a raised panel line rather than with a correct recessed panel line. Well, of course it's easier! 

    That's the point I was trying to make... they cut corners and took the easy way out.

    No wonder Pyro kits have such a stellar reputation... :rolleyes:

    Um, I wouldn't be so hard on them. As others have also repeatedly mentioned, majority of companies making injection-molded styrene model kits used raised details to represent panel lines in their kits (cars, armor, airplanes, etc).  That was the de-facto way of doing things - not cutting corners.  Just like with everything, manufacturing methods and techniques improve with time. Actually automotive models were probably the first type of models to break that mold :D. Aircraft models continued to have raised panel lines for many years after all car models converted to engraved panel lines.  There are probably still some small manufacturers who still have raised panel lines on their models.

  7. My methods would make most airbrush users cringe.  I use organic solvent based (the smelly) paints. Either hobby or automotive, or even fingernail polishes.  My secret is to apply the paint rather heavily. When it goes on wet, it will level to a nice and glossy finish.  Mist coats partially dry before getting tot he model's surface creating a very rough surface finish or "orange peel". My method results in a paint job which I do not need to rub out or polish - it is contest-quality right out of the airbrush. :D  The only thing I have to worry about is paint runs. But I have learned to apply wet coats which which are not quite wet enough to run.

    This 1:43 model was painted with Tamiya fine gray primer (decanted from a spray can), met. blue nail polish, and Testors Wet Look Clear (decanted from a spray can).  The body is not polished or even waxed.

     

    LeftRear_zps438ea7f7.jpg

  8. You can also use epoxy resins for casting clear parts. Just do not use glue-tyoe of epoxy (like the 5-minute epoxy) as those will eventually discolor and turn brown. Plus, those are usually too viscous to get good results.

    I have successfully used Envirotex (stocked by hobby and arts/craft stores) and also resin from http://www.unrealdetails.com/ .  Both of those have overnight cure time. As mentioned earlier, make sure to have them cure at a temperature over 70 degrees F.  I usually cure my clear-cast parts in the dehydrator at around 115 degrees F.  And make sure to measure the A and B parts very accurately.

  9.  

     I currently have a bottle of Testers decal setting solution and the ingredients are listed as citric acid so you are probably correct although I imagine the ph level would be the important thing to get right.

    Citric Acid or Acetic Acid?  I have worked with various decal setting solutions using Acetic Acid but I have never encountered one using Citric Acid.

    Microscale has a nice document describing the usage of their various products. http://www.microscale.com/Merchant2/graphics/Instructions/MSISysteminstr.pdf

  10. I recently finished the Monogram Essex Cobra. The finished product was the worst job I've done since returning the hobby.

    I coated the decals with Micro Industries Decal Film. When I applied them, there was residue from the decal film on the edge of each decal. I call them decal film buggers. Some wiped off with a damp Q-tip, but the final results were pretty poor.

    When I applied the film, I just painted it on with a small flat brush that I use exclusively for decal work. I applied it liberally to the sheet and the didn't try to stay away from the edges of the decals. Should I be applying it with the brush? Should I try to apply it as close to the edge of each individual decal as possible and not get any beyond the edge?

    I never tried to use it just to coat the decal images. I simply brush-paint several coats over the entire decal sheet. When I am ready to apply the decals I just cut out each decal out of the sheet, trimming the paper as close to the image as possible.

  11. There are several different decal setting solution formulas.  I have about half a dozen brands/types, so if one doesn't work, I can try another one.

    There are however 2 distinct types of decal softening solutions.   Let's take Microscale's solutions for example (since they make and sell both types as a complete decal setting solution):  They sell Micro-set (blue label) and Micro-sol (red label).  The Micro-sol is based on acetic acid (smells like vinegar) but the Micro-sol formula is based on some other (unknown) organic solvent. It has no vinegar smell but it does have very distinct smell (maybe some sort of alcohol).  If you read their literature, they recommend using both of those solutions to get the best results.

    Here is the official info about Micro-sol and Micro-set http://www.microscale.com/Merchant2/graphics/Instructions/MSISysteminstr.pdf

  12. Yes, the angle and elevation of the camera makes a big difference in realism of the photo. Also using wide angle lens will exaggerate the perspective (and increase the depth of field). It all adds up to having a model looking more like a real car.

    Here is a photo I took of a friend's model. It was taken outside under natural overcast lighting.

    OMx-front.jpg

  13. I am not sure it will work for model parts but i have used a power drill on acrylics and lexans. I used masking tape on both sides and then sandwiched the plastic between 2 pieces of wood and drilled through both. Make sure to keep the wood clamped together really tight. 

    That method does work well for any flat piece of plastic or even sheet metal. But most model car windows are curved )often compound curves) so they cannot be clamped between to flat pieces of wood. 

×
×
  • Create New...