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1990-1991 Ford LTD Crown Vic/1987-1989 Chevy Caprice


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Robert, here is a though that may get you past the snag on your grille design. What if you had a photo etched grille made? Micro Etch Technologies does work for individuals.

Hi Tim. Thank you, I'll try them for the 88-91 Cv because I can't think of a better way to do it. For this one, the thicker grill might work. I'm getting the grill parts tomorrow and will photograph it to see if it at least looks right. 

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This looks amazing!  I can hardly believe I am looking at an accurate scale replica of the Crown Vic.  So many attempts have been made over the years and none have come close on accuracy.  Best of luck with the continuation of this project.  

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Looking good. Do you plan to paint this? I was reading on the forums some about the topic of "post production finishing". All of the frosted parts have vegetable oil sprayed on them to give the plastic more clarity. It is recommended that they be washed in a tub of dish soap and scrubbed with a toothbrush. Guys were saying that soaking overnight helps, and adding some vinegar will help break up the oil even more. They say that some solvents will attack polyacrylics. But some guys have used some pretty harsh chemicals on the printed parts (which would attack/destroy styrene). They don't attack the polyacrylics in the short term, but who knows about the long term.

They had also said that clearcoating the parts helps fill print lines. And it can give the paint "tooth", if you plan to paint them.

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Also they were saying that as a general rule the plastic parts are not shipped fully cured. As a result, they can be sticky when painted. The best recommended way to get them cured is with UVA light. Incidentally, reptiles in captivity need UVA light to function at their best, so you can pick up a UVA bulb at a pet store, or, on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Reptispa-Basking-Spot-Lamp-Watts/dp/B00U1WOFRG/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1479525648&sr=8-4&keywords=uva+bulb

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Looking good. Do you plan to paint this? I was reading on the forums some about the topic of "post production finishing". All of the frosted parts have vegetable oil sprayed on them to give the plastic more clarity. It is recommended that they be washed in a tub of dish soap and scrubbed with a toothbrush. Guys were saying that soaking overnight helps, and adding some vinegar will help break up the oil even more. They say that some solvents will attack polyacrylics. But some guys have used some pretty harsh chemicals on the printed parts (which would attack/destroy styrene). They don't attack the polyacrylics in the short term, but who knows about the long term.

They had also said that clearcoating the parts helps fill print lines. And it can give the paint "tooth", if you plan to paint them.

thanks! 

Yes, I'll paint it because I want the castings to be glossy. The material is Watershed 11122, which polishes easily to a rock hard finish, so I'll polish the glass parts. 

 Veg oil in this case would screw with the primer so I can't use anything like that. These parts will be as clean as possible. No washing needed due to the alcohol scrub bath after removal from the 3d resin in the printer. 

Ive never had anything react badly to printed parts. I use superglues, exceleraters, acrylic clean, paints, primers, etc. Plastic solvent won't work as a glue, but UV solvent glue will. I've stored parts for 8 years with no ill affect. 

Clearcoating works, as does primer. 

 

 

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Also they were saying that as a general rule the plastic parts are not shipped fully cured. As a result, they can be sticky when painted. The best recommended way to get them cured is with UVA light. Incidentally, reptiles in captivity need UVA light to function at their best, so you can pick up a UVA bulb at a pet store, or, on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Reptispa-Basking-Spot-Lamp-Watts/dp/B00U1WOFRG/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1479525648&sr=8-4&keywords=uva+bulb

it's possible, but I've never heard that. These parts got a UV session for an hour. They felt tacky for a few hours but are solid now. 

The only only issues with 3D SLA printing are: 

1. that it is pricey at this time for one offs

2. A lot of sanding layer lines for most printers (unless you use a super high resolution printer where you can't see the lines. I've used these for cockpits)

3. not archival. They sag over time unless you support it with other parts or material. FDM and SLS do not have this problem, but don't have the same detail. 

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I'm sure this will be a popular model to have and I'm amazed at the lengths you going to ending up with an injection molded product! I'd be interested in seeing how the body comes from a 3D printer as I'm just beginning to have some parts made that way.

thank you Foxer. Photos are above

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Not necessarily a buyer of this model but I am really impressed with how you are developing it. Hoping that the future of model building is one where a model builder could actually design their "holy grail" and not have to hope that a model company decided to tool up that long awaited kit. 

thank you Mike. It's almost like that now, we just have to crowd fund a bit if a single person is not willing to cover their whole cost. Two people cut the cost in half. A local club or Facebook group, more so. It's also getting cheaper every year. This would have cost a lot more 10 years ago and nearly impossible 15 years ago. 

Since I hire out professionals, my costs are higher, but some builders do CAD. Some have 3D printers. Some mold and cast. If you look hard enough, you can find people willing to chip in

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That looks really good. I agree that the bumper is too close to the headlights.  The other thing that jumped out at me is the gap around the fuel door.  It seems awfully wide and deep.  The door lines seem much more subtle (which to me looks better).

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I need a few of these in my life. any updates on this?

update # 1. I tried to get an estimate for injection molding at a low volume rapid injection molding shop. I didn't know they need .STP files. 3D printing files are commonly .STLs. My CADrafter is getting a program to be able to output the new files. Hopefully that's done soon because I can't wait to get the styrene numbers. 

 

update # 2. Gas door fixed. Front grille fixed. The front nose needs holes instead of pins (bumper has pins) so that will be fixed today. Then hopefully back to the printer tomorrow 

 

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