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1:12 1969 Camaro Z/28 as seen in the August '69 issue of Car Life.


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Greetings,

My hope is to reproduce the 1969 Z/28 tested by Car Life magazine in their August '69 issue, it being an example featuring the JL8 four wheel disc brakes, the dual Holley cross ram intake, the chambered exhaust system option as well as a front Endura body-colored bumper. Definitely eyeball searing, the actual vehicle was finished in Daytona Yellow w/black stripes combined with a yellow Deluxe interior w/black hounds tooth inserts.

1969%20Camaro%20one%20001_zpsrcqbgykg.jp

Things I want to achieve here are limited, with emphasis placed on coming up with better standard wheels and tires, proper four-piston caliper detail all around, a reshaped front bumper to reflect the Endura issue contour, along with other reasoned changes and updates. I'll try to skip explaining reproduction of the obvious, reserving attention for those aspects of the project that seem unique.

Mike K.

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Greetings,

Formerly believing that Tamiya aerosol tints were best reserved for McLaren Can Am windscreen or perhaps Lotus F1 topics, I was slow to try their products on an otherwise ordinary production model kit 'glass'. I feared it would go on too heavily, be difficult to control for even application and perhaps etch the surface of the clear plastic I'd wish to apply it to (understood as something other than an R/C shell). Not really a problem in practice, although the front windscreen had to be redone multiple times for the sunscreen along the top was less evenly applied than I desired. Thanks...

Mike K.

1969%20Camaro%20one%20002_zps4r8laqnh.jp

1969%20Camaro%20one%20003_zpsh91fpz3b.jp

...not terribly out of line even if it first appears dark. Something to recommend then.

M.K.

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Greetings,

The following is a short run down of what will be a composite wheel intended to facilitate clean paintwork as well as add needed dimension to the standard 15X7 Chevrolet Rally wheel on this application. Most of it is simple, although molding the tire as well as the assorted bits and pieces might take a little time. I'd expect to fill a standard 1967 Corvette Firestone with clay on the inside, effectively cast two-thirds of it face down in two-part urethane, combine two castings to alter the section width, and finally scrub off the sidewall tire markings prior to the creation of a final two-piece mold.

1969%20Camaro%20one%20006_zpsila3extq.jp

From left to right then may be seen the as-delivered Revell/Monogram Rally wheel, a solitary trim ring, next a spacer cut from the back of a Revell 1957 Chevrolet whitewall tire insert (also in 1:12th scale), a solo Rally wheel cap with a thicker and more rounded bottom aspect, a Rally wheel 'center stamping', and finally - a Revell/Monogram 1967 Corvette finned aluminum wheel positioned upside down (you may now catch your breath!). Below from left to right may be seen a standard Firestone tire from the Corvette kit, a later 245-14-70 Eagle ST, whereas to the far right will be found a wider Firestone made up of two vinyl tires with two added tread 'ribs' to mimic a Wide Oval section. Given I am sitting on about twenty of the thin 'stones, I thought I'd cut up two just to see if meshing a pair was possible, if the resultant tread patterns might be coherent, etc. What is afforded is a fairly convincing Wide Oval period pattern.

1969%20Camaro%20one%20007_zpsclizfc8k.jp

The spacer is employed to create a gap between the base and the center wheel stamping proper. The outer extent of each of the five wheel stamping ovals punched in stand to be finished next. I want the outer extent of the stamping to smoothly fall away with the white spacer solely responsible for holding the trim ring up and level too! 1:1 restoration specialists afford Rally wheel paint in the correct silver with just the slightest green tint, whereas soon I hope to purchase such.

1969%20Camaro%20one%20009_zpsl6vmulst.jp

...difficult to discern, but the tire is wider, a slight gap is seen between the trim ring and the center stamping, while the center cap rides higher than before. Try if you will to imagine the five slot 'pockets' cleaned up.

1969%20Camaro%20one%20010_zps3ivay8va.jp

...side-by-side then.

1969%20Camaro%20seven%20002_zpshegmjc8j.

1969%20Camaro%20seven%20003_zps047z9lh6.

...some material has been added to the top of each front bumper end to differentiate the shape of part from the standard chrome-plated steel bumper that is the more typical fitment. This would be the option VE3, while it helps to sand down the mounting hardware slightly in addition to rounding the top corners looking back. Thanks...

M. K.

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Greetings,

A bit of web research and following up leads afforded by friends turned up a means to secure 1:12th sidewall tires markings appropriate to this topic. It seems early in the production run Firestone Sports Car 200's were fitted, and then a changeover was made to what are termed Goodyear Wide Tread GT's.

Wide%20Tread%20GT%20image_zpsqa6ae8le.jp

Joseph at Fireball Modelworks affords us a comprehensive range of ALPS-printed tire markings in 1:24th and 1:25th, whereas I asked nicely if his Goodyear Wide Tread GT art could be blown up to 1:12th as per my request. The answer was in the affirmative, hence some news to jot down if you find yourself in like need. Thanks...

http://www.fireballmodels.info/

Mike K.

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More haphazard updates all in a row...

I wished to create a soft mask between the bellhousing and the engine block proper to replicate the factory finish, hence what is seen below is what I came up with. Cheap and simple, and no airbrush is required. I employed a pair of cocktail sauce containers and connected them end to end, whereas one side was opened to permit the placement of the transmission more or less inside with a single toothpick employed to center the assembly prior to painting. It seems to have worked well enough, so perhaps something for the reader to try. Thanks...

1969%20Camaro%20three%20016_zpsxxyb6avl.

...the setup post effort. The plastic rod is positioned simply to demonstrate that the bottom has been opened to allow the engine/transmission assembly to be squeezed into it.

1969%20Camaro%20three%20014_zpskiocbxxc.

Note the strange and severely tapered oil filter has been cut free here and straightened top to bottom with a modest additional lip added to the bottom to good measure. For later placing the AC oil filter decal in place, it seems the shape of the decal is reliant on the filter being 'straightened up' for sanding if the image is going to line up from top to bottom.

The instructions call out that the filter ought to be painted blue, whereas for my reference it is revealed that white is the correct finish. I used Tamiya Matte White and can relate that the finish is a very good match for the white employed on the decal provided; i.e. one can't sense that Revell/Monogram used anything but a clear decal with the AC markings. If my meaning is muddled, know that the pair of discrete double lines in blue on the decal won't line up where they meet up on the backside if you don't reshape the filter entire. Given the AC logo wouldn't by chance be perfectly positioned to scream out it's identification on an actual vehicle, I'll align the same a bit to the right or left.

I should relate that the bottom of the block nearest the oil filter position should be patched and trued up before applying paint, although I'll have to fabricate something and blend it in post-paint for my oversight of such here. Be alert and do it better than I!

M.K.

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More then... Though I don't own a hobby lathe, happily I was able to lend time on that owned by a friend. Here will be seen the back half of my Rally wheel taking shape. A '67 Corvette wheel has been scrubbed of the cooling fins and recycled, while two of the very handy '57 Chevrolet wide whitewall tire inserts have been cut apart to yield two spacers to more or less afford me a zero offset wheel. The 'center stamping' is simply the base of the standard '69 Camaro wheel sanded down along the perimeter to 'finish' the shape of what was already there in terms of material. O.K. - look down!

1969%20Camaro%20three%20006_zpsdzu9jb5h.

...looking fairly good, with the cleaned up item seen right.

1969%20Camaro%20three%20005_zpsawbj8i0f.

...where and how to get the 'spacer' material. Look for chewed up glue bombs to source same.

1969%20Camaro%20three%20004_zps2uohzqwl.

...one spacer atop the center stamping and one situated below.

1969%20Camaro%20three%20007_zpskpw0lpvu.

...back side of wheel less center, to speak little of hub and brake detail to come.

1969%20Camaro%20three%20015_zps9u2ubps0.

...still requiring finish work to thin the five individual slots consistent with disguising the material to appear a bit thinner, but largely good to go. All items to be cast in resin and subsequently vacuum plated if and as required. Thanks...

Mike K.

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...a small succession of ideas then:

1969%20Camaro%20three%20010_zpsq9uwn82g.

My first experiment with gel pens is seen above. I noticed that when viewing a '69 Camaro close-in that the tailights are quite dark nearest the tail panel. Hoping to 'get the toy' out of the scale replica, I thought it might be a good idea to try to mask off the edge of each taillight lense casting from the outside to effectively reproduce this look. I only noticed this detail on a '69 Camaro inspected this past weekend as I write this, but it seemed a sound idea. I hope to add headlamp bulbs too for as nice as the headlamp assemblies were designed they look a bit dead in the center. Material to add then...

1969%20Camaro%20three%20009_zps7cji1fsn.

1969%20Camaro%20three%20008_zpsdi4v9icx.

...not every Z/28 had full exterior chrome decollage. The Car Life '69 Z/28 in particular has no drip rail chrome or wheel arch chrome trim for that matter; i.e. something like a base Nova or maybe a C.O.P.O. then. I really didn't want to bother sanding the raised wheel arch trim down on the body, hence I cheated a bit and simply radiused each opening until they effectively disappeared. The contour hardly changed, hence I think I got away with it.

1969%20Camaro%20three%20013_zps8jw2t1g2.

...the crossram lid provided did not have the correct carburetor linkage clearance 'pockets' across the top - hence I tried to add them. Just free hand etching, and so not perfect this. Maybe notice that I opted to pour a considerable quantity of Tamiya Transluscent Blue into my Tamiya Chrome Silver in an attempt to mimic Silver Cadium Dichromate for the attachment hardware. Silver with a touch of blue then; i.e. subtle and nice to have.

1969%20Camaro%20three%20001_zpsimf56teo.

...the model as it come has a 'steel' hood without the underhood ducting - although we get the fresh air seal beneath. I suppose one could just fabricate the base of the filter as seen here (a bit oversized - yes), try variants in the form of a taller Purolater filter element (a common period mod.), or introduce wafers of material to replicate the top and bottom of the filter. Sort of like the large Liberty musclecar engines, painting the filter element ivory works better than employing off white.

1969%20Camaro%20three%20002_zpstqmv6ij2.

...the base of the as-delivered kit fresh air seal is a mess of ejector pin marks and holes in uncomfortable places. Here I cheated and fabricated a fill panel to overlay what lurks beneath.

1969%20Camaro%20three%20003_zpsesdwmibg.

...riding a bit high, although I could substitute thinner material to bring it all down a bit. Floquil Grimy Black was used on the seal, although efforts seen online in this regard look very nice indeed and in the main. Thanks for reading...

Mike K.

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Nice work!!!

I hope you keep posting...my daughter, along with my help/advise/coaching is going to build this kit for her 4-H project. I would love to pick up a few ideas for her build.

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...another brief update,

Discerned within the image below will be noticed a pair of drilled recesses on the front of the harmonic balancer (look in the shadow of the fan blade to the extreme left - hopefully you'll make them out), a more pronounced TDC 'slash' on the edge of the balancer brought into alignment for timing this mini mill, as well as holes drilled on the edge of the cylinder head facing the viewer. To my embarrassment it seems my harmonic balancer is installed backwards and is too thick for a Chevrolet 302. Matters to correct then...

1969%20Camaro%20four%20006_zpsgd9uvgy2.j

-

Looking at the intake casting of the as-delivered Revell/Monogram part, I noticed that they had rendered the ends of the dual extended plenums more or less flat but for a small bump of material to accommodate the hardware coming through on the top. For examination of the part, enough material exists to sand and reshape matters without added too much material, hence I filed between the edges of each plenum end (where on either side a bolt comings through and holds the intake top in place), and then filed the top of each rectangular plenum so that I might introduce some round stock to replicate the lip facing up. Given I could sand the round stock flat from the top, using half-round or quarter-round plastic stock wasn't strictly required. The round stock was easier to control too, for is stuff is too delicate to cleanly add, what's the point?

1969%20Camaro%20four%20001_zpsdshbwst2.j

...a temperature sensor port has been added to the manifold atop the coolant opening as seen. The rectangular plenum chambers (two then) have been reshaped, whereas a few drops of CA glue mixed with Microballoons was employed to add a little length to the edge of the plenum chambers where the hardware would route through to hold the top cover to the bottom casting given there wasn't sufficient material afforded on the stock kit here. The Winters foundry mark was scrubbed down a bit given it was too high and could be mistaken for cast-in hardware. This would be the hexagon bump seen on the first intake runner a bit right of center.

1969%20Camaro%20four%20002_zpsajommm0n.j

...backside and pretty much a repeat of the front. Some material was removed for distributor clearance as per stock.

1969%20Camaro%20four%20003_zpstbp0gze4.j

1969%20Camaro%20four%20004_zpsoep9jqy1.j

...viewed upside down. The white lip constitutes the added material, whereas the small gap was eventually made up with CA glue and Microballoons again. I opted to paint the entire assembly upside down and heavily too so as to blend everything done in paint. Thanks for reading and thanks for the good cheer expressed.

Mike K.

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...an update then,

Enough material was noticed on the fuel pump mounting flange to suggest that cutting it apart from the block would be feasible, while further doing such would help facilitate paintwork. Secondly, the gap beneath the oil filter cut free, also to facilitate paintwork was plugged and painted level to the bottom of the block mains girdle. It seems Revell/Monogram tooled the wrong harmonic balancer, while my reference material suggests that such should be thinner with a deeper pulley set just before it. To the extent that I am able, I'll attempt to correct matters. Tiny steps then...

1969%20Camaro%20five%20002_zpsemv0pvjk.j

...the oil filter seemed to rest too flat on the bottom of the block/mains girdle rail, hence I cut a small wafer of material to serve as a gasket of sorts. It seems to help even if it can be scarcely seen.

1969%20Camaro%20five%20001_zpszhggathh.j

...more to facilitate paintwork, here the fuel pump has been cut free, painted and returned to the block. The seam in the center of the fuel pump is right, although the base needed work given it wasn't quite round enough. As the bottom of the fuel pump assembly is gold cad. plated, I decided to scrub it off and scratch build a replacement to paint off the assembly. A black wash of the center of the fan clutch was also done, although such is not visible here. Lastly, the harmonic balancer has since been pulled and narrowed for depth, with five holes partially drilled in on one side, two on the other. Thanks...

Mike K.

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...and still more,

The harmonic balancer has been reversed for position and thinned. Note that the pulleys and belt haven't been painted. Do see that an aluminum alternator pulley is taking form - something seen on the performance oriented Chevrolets being slightly deeper for cut and hence less likely to throw a fan belt at higher RPM's.

Also seen is a breather tube and breather. The cross ram intake either had this port plugged, w/breather tube and fill cap, or with a proper breather. The Car Life test car has the breather topped tube, whereas the b&w image suggests some shade of gray was employed. The tube is just round stock, whereas the breather is a resin clone of something found on a 1:18th Lane '68 Shelby GT 500 KR with the center puddled in with additional material to fill a small divot present in the center. If anyone needs stock-appearing 1:12th oil breathers, contact me via IM.

Moving on, the Delco-Moraine power brake booster chamber has been cleaned up for removal of the cast-in distribution block situated to the bottom right face of it as-tooled. As for a 'paint recipe' for gold cad., know that I painted first with Tamiya Bare Metal Silver, then dusted with Tamiya Gold from two feet distant, and finally I hit it with a rapid close-in shot of Tamiya Clear Blue to lend that gold cad. plated funkiness to the surface of it consistent with getting a bit of coating flow across the surface. Thanks for reading and for the positive feedback too.

Mike K.

1969%20Camaro%20six%20001_zpsncx0o4nf.jp

... the modified booster chamber. Restoring the contour beneath took work. Helping simplify matters is the fact that the JL8 4-wheel disc brakes (when factory fitted) does away with the proportioning valve situated directly below the master cylinder proper, whereas much more to come here.

1969%20Camaro%20six%20002_zpsoovohcvr.jp

...the top of the water pump has also been plugged. I didn't want anything strictly showing through on the back when hoses are fitted. The top of the two-piece carburetors are quietly resting in place sans glue just to roughly see how'll they'll look.

1969%20Camaro%20six%20003_zpsm2xynxut.jp

...a better view of the harmonic balancer is availed thus. The white will vanish when I finalize the pulley design and paint whatever I come up with. Thanks again...

M.K.

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Greetings and thanks for the kind words,

Indeed, I'm situated close to the Macomb show, being about a mile and a half away from said venue. Being long out of kit fab. and kit finish practice, I'm deep in the struggle of establishing a balance between making matters complex and yet maintaining pace consistent with finishing what you see. If I'm really on pace, then what is glimpsed here might be done by November. Below are seen a few unglamorous updates...

1969%20Camaro%20eight%20001_zpsjhjxyjcf.

Above can be seen the bottom half of the inner fender sheetmetal/panel stiffener painted body color versus black. Tedious to mask, although I tried to use the proverbial 'Best Stuff on Earth' for employment of Tamiya tape and trash can liners cut to reveal only the areas I wished to spray. Minutes later I decided I was dissatisfied with this and acted to remove the cast-in material from the chassis casting proper...

1969%20Camaro%20eight%20002_zpsu8k5pkcz.

...all targeted material on the top of each fender well liner is gone, although the much harder fender fab. work is to come. Such project aspects can slow me to a crawl, while know too that I've cut off the odd battery mount and washer fluid bottle (wrong side for a '69 perhaps?) for the cast-in rendering of these items seemed more a concession to cost than anything else. Most people would judge that the 1:12th Camaro kit is pretty much a scaled-up 1:25th kit even as they rightfully laud this as a very good tool. In modest ways I hope to address some of these things without trash talking what are discerned as shortcomings noticed here and there...

1969%20Camaro%20eight%20003_zps8emttjvf.

...workaday efforts to plug and fill the radiator support.

1969%20Camaro%20eight%20004_zpsxeg7zu2h.

...thermostat housing with new flange detail added to the engine assembly, while the carburetor bottoms with their cast-in linkages reappear here. I tried to thoroughly dilute some Tamiya Translucent Green for pouring a tiny quantity of it into a new bottle of Tamiya Acrylic clear in the hope of coming up with a light color wash on the linkage itself. It works better in-person for all colors seem so vibrant for being photographed and posted online, so 'seen live' know the effect isn't strictly terrible. Fuel lines and linkages to come. Note how the primaries and air horns are both outboard...

1969%20Camaro%20eight%20006_zpss55wveyi.

...as per my reading, apparently factory headers could be ordered and were supplied loose in the trunk in '67 and '68. Come '69, the same could be bought over the counter, whereas @ $500 per set uninstalled they seemed wildly overpriced. Reviewing posts on something called the Camaro Research Group turned up a set of Bill Thomas constructed factory headers finished in a silvery blue, while I first wish to correct the routing of a few tubes before I fab. better header flanges and paint whatever I conjure. The flanges will start with a tracing of the basic shape on thick plastic, continue as I drill out the slots seen between the pipes, continue as I refine the shape of the edges of each, and finally, be thinned for sanding down the presumably inaccurate thickness of the sheet plastic employed. I typically find a good head-on shot of the flanges and size them to the scale I'm working with to simplify matters a little, then CA glue the image to whatever sheet stuff I opt to employ prior to any concerted slash and hack. All very tedious, while know they'll look a touch goofy given the alternator mount won't have much to support coming off the front of the driver's side exhaust header front as seen!

1969%20Camaro%20eight%20005_zpsn0cuhldu.

...black cad. was proving a difficult shade to find in a rattle can. This is Rustoleum Oiled Dark Bronze sourced from a Meynard's and conveniently sold in a humongous 'Lifetime Supply' size. Another near identical shade also sold there was used on the hinges, while mixing up finishes to suggest multiple parts suppliers is almost always good practice. Though not heartstoppingly interesting, I opened the ends of each horn with a Dremel in a rough fashion with the center surely drilled deepest, then inserted successive drops of CA glue to effectively burn the resultant surface to even matters out. It seems to work. Thanks for examining this post...

Mike K.

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  • 2 weeks later...

...another update,

1969%20Camaro%20nine%20004_zpsexaglbpk.j

...given the one-piece/one-side nature of the leaf spring molds, the pair of clips on each assembly weren't strictly finished across the top. Nothing spectacular this...

1969%20Camaro%20nine%20008_zps9cajvlln.j

...more use of Rustoleum's very good Oiled Metallic Bronze - this time dusted onto the leaf springs.

1969%20Camaro%20nine%20001_zpsoewfehat.j

...the patched front subframe plus top contour awaiting paint.

1969%20Camaro%20nine%20009_zpsniibl6hc.j

...sliced alternator with added layer painted orangish brown if you will. It likely should be thinner, while on another topic I was happy to discover that the alternator mount provided wasn't strictly wrong as per the Car Life feature. Given alternators are often changed out and rebuilt, some show up gray in this area for three thin layers of material positioned back-to-back. I might alter this, but at present I'm at peace with the result.

Some other aluminum tube as well as a machined aluminum nut finishes off the front of the alternator, while a bit of visual trickery suggests that the fan belt actually stretches around it. Given I just ground down the front of the alternator to clear away space for the turned aluminum pulley, I was worried how silly or dumb the result would be. Not so terrible in practice then. Also seen is the radiator cap which was stripped and cleaned up prior to being painted Krylon Chrome. Scarcely visible is the wire below the radiator cap poking out in anticipation of a radiator overflow hose being added and routed downward.

1969%20Camaro%20nine%20010_zpsefupuuto.j

...what might be a check valve for the power brake vacuum hose to the booster itself in 1:1.

1969%20Camaro%20nine%20011_zpstfwbqhxe.j

...as reproduced even if it's a touch large. Plastic rod filled with putty dries to a dimple in the center, plus 'L' section plastic, plus Testor's Ivory paint applied lightly to suggest the item is semi-translucent. A bit of wire was added to serve as an anchoring point for hose work to come. Lastly, the gasket between it and the booster chamber proper had been painted as per the post before...

1969%20Camaro%20nine%20012_zps3hdbjdnp.j

...an unpainted distributor cap topped with gloss clear suggests Bakelite. The vacuum pot for the spark advance diaphram was spray painted for isolating the rest of the assembly with a Silly Putty mask stretched thin and thick. Further use of wire is seen - again to afford somewhere to anchor a small hose leading to it.

1969%20Camaro%20nine%20013_zpsjxk4bhta.j

...frustrated with the split and faint master cylinder/brake fluid reservoir top, I scratch built a replacement. Not terrible, although handling some of the items to position such wasn't strictly fun. Eventually I applied glue with the greatest care to the cover, positioned discreet bits to add positioned upside-down on the exposed skin of my knee, and finally did my best to line up the additions to the cover for pressing the larger sub-assembly face first. Tuning the position of the additions proved easier than adding the same entire!

1969%20Camaro%20nine%20015_zpskrm7xucc.j

...most hardware in place less fuel lines, electrical wiring, etc. Power valve springs on the carburetors are dark red as per Heartbeat City's online reference material. The alternator mount will be tucked into towards the water pump, whereas the long spacer leading to the cylinder head too will be done in time on the other side. Also note that as the hardware holding the thing together routes through the back half of the alternator housing, the cast-in bolt heads should be ground off the face of the assembly looking forward to be drilled out as shown. A small dimple of steel paint disguise the lack of actual hardware across the inserted layer at four points, hence this too seems acceptable at present. Kind thanks for examining this posting...

Mike K.

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Great work so far Mike. Your attention to the finer details is faultless and encouraging, I like where this is headed. :)

Loving the idea behind the "wider" rear tyres too, I think this is something most of us have tried at some point. I have an idea a mate may actually be casting them? I will have to check with him. ;)

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You are doing a great job on this. 

If you painted this car maroon it could have been the car my friend owned a 20 years ago. I do remember the rear brakes were the same as a Corvette, or very close to them. The test drives sitting on a milk crate with open headers was a treat. They used to have a Camaro show up at the GM tech center every year. Not sure if it still goes on or not. 

For some silly reason he sold this car and purchased a 70 , He said they were faster so that is why he did it. LOL 

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Greetings and thanks for the nice feedback afforded.  I do cast my own stuff in two-part resin with like urethane molds, hence a big 'we'll see' is proffered in relation to doing clones and more.  All this will take time, although if I proceed apace perhaps the perceived hurdle won't prove too great?  As anyone who has tried such, creating the master, developing a working approach to a mold and then making such does take time - but then it's easy!  I hesitate to promise anything given step-by-step follow through is something I'm definitely working on, hence this build constitutes an effort to unblock myself and spread knowledge of right finishes across other projects that await my reengagement and (hoped for) resurgent confidence.

1969%20Camaro%20ten%20003_zpsyak7sn5a.jp

...note the revised paint finish on master cylinder fluid reservoir top, while a thinner silver decal (a low-rent 'mount' this) is witnessed on the bottom of the coil now mounted askew and leaning to the left. Hitherto just a hole awaiting something, I've added a tiny Walther's miniature bolt and washer to more or less secure the fan shroud in place as per stock.  The Walther's bolt employed seemed a bit thick on top, hence it was sanded down and later a small dimple was drilled on the top and center of it prior to adding the washer and painting them together.  The fan shroud was stripped of clear and carries no finish given cheap injected black-colored plastic looks about the same in 1:1!  Oh - and I tucked in that alternator mount!

Proceeding ahead then, the vacuum one-way valve on the booster chamber now points downward as per a cross ram setup.  Black oxide hardware paint (of a sort!) is barely discerned on the two radiator support-to-fender inner lip braces (better than just painting everything silver which is always a temptation!), whereas thoroughgoing Silly Putty masking was used to isolate and paint the upper control arm tie bars.  Touching in the mounting hardware on said control arm tie bars (whatever these darn things are called!) looked very silly, hence 'all of a color' is how they'll be.  Additional hardware and paint for stuff nearby is to come.  Maybe I'll cut up a bicycle inner tube in an attempt to reproduce the rubber control arm weather shrouds..?

1969%20Camaro%20ten%20001_zpsft8rtdg9.jp

...though not really thrilled with my 'steel' paint finish in-a-can, note the split U-joint effort, the cleaned up and slightly recessed joint ends (C-clips in-scale would be a bit too much I dare say!), as well as the lightly stippled line etched into the length of the driveshaft hopefully mimicking where such would be welded.  The old magazine is one of about 1,400 period issues I have, whereas the Car Life issue relates a '68 Z/28 test within.  Thanks for reading and following along...

Mike K.

Edited by swede70
Endless revisions much as I do in scale...
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Great work so far Mike. Your attention to the finer details is faultless and encouraging, I like where this is headed. :)

Loving the idea behind the "wider" rear tyres too, I think this is something most of us have tried at some point. I have an idea a mate may actually be casting them? I will have to check with him. ;)

Beautiful and daring stuff you do!  I'm more used to light fab. work in the realm of 1:18th projects where 'rolling your own' seems at times the only way to have parts and to make progress, hence I'm in awe of your more and most elaborate efforts in 1:12th.  Four-piston Corvette-style calipers as well as the aforementioned described wheels and tires are about as far as I'll go here by way of modest contrast, whereas to note your kind words and attention means much.  Thank you kindly...

Mike K.

The mold line on the fuel pump is accurate. Here's a link to a picture of a real one, if that's allowed. http://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/331443800283-0-1/s-l1000.jpg

Indeed, the base is to come.  Although cheating of a sort, a second kit will soon be purchased to free up the spares situation which slowly grows acute, whereas stuff availed thus will include material for the base of the fuel pump and more too.  By way of further example, I'll likely glue up a radiator support with the tiny braces up front to better site the inner fender/inner wing detail I intend to scratch build.  I have quite good head-on images to use for this, whereas for playing with image reproduction sizes I'll come up with something akin to a 1:12th reproduction to guide my efforts in this regard.  Oh - and a better done water pump might be good too!  Worried here I do suppose, for I tend to work a bit above my head and am given to being carried away by minutiae. 

 

Mike K.

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