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How about looking at the most popular JoHan subjects. I wonder how much from the F100 could transfer to a stock Maverick?

Not much, considering they are two ENTIRELY different vehicles in ever way besides the FORD name, and 4 tires on the pavement.

 

Art

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First series '60s Econolines might do well, since there's a jillion ways you can customize them - for that matter, can't believe after almost fifty years of the Little Red Wagon kit that IMC or its successors never tooled an A-100 van body.

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First series '60s Econolines might do well, since there's a jillion ways you can customize them - for that matter, can't believe after almost fifty years of the Little Red Wagon kit that IMC or its successors never tooled an A-100 van body.

IMG_0178-vi.jpgThere's always resin to the rescue.  

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Early Econoline in 1/25 would be great, similar to the old 1/20 MPC kits but as a 2 in 1, stock or custom. Or for something different a Holden Torana SL/R5000, now that'd be great.

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If the rumor regarding the '59 Dodge is true, then Moebius could work with Okey Spalding to bring back some of the other Jo-Han models.  From reading the Forum, it appears that many like modified vehicles, trucks, drag cars, cartoonish vehicles, as well as the 3-in-1 kits.  Moebius would do well to continue producing cars and trucks that were never done before.  Niche vehicles such as a '67 Marlin or '64 Starfire would be great, but the market demand is probably small.  The '66-'79 Ranchero is something that wasn't done: the '66-'71 could yield a few variations, the '72-'76 look pretty much the same except for the grille and bumpers, and the '77-'79 look alike.  Car and truck enthusiasts would buy these.  It's the same for the '70-'72 El Camino, '71-'72 GMC Sprint, and '73-'77 El Camino.  A series of Indy 500 Pace Car models representing the '50s through '70s would do well.  A lot of these models could be made into low riders, lead sleds, Donks, and also be built stock.          

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A series of Indy 500 Pace Car models representing the '50s through '70s would do well.         

I'll go along with that!!

If nothing else, just for the Desoto & the Merc!

 

Steve

 

1956DesotoPaceCar-vi_zpsf1vne4fx.jpg010147cce4d83aa1b39f17af6fb7d584_zpshden5296231949_8055fd544d_z_zps61utmu62.jpgFL13_r537_01_zpsinm8uihk.jpgautowp.ru_oldsmobile_98_convertible_indy

I suspect some would, most probably would not.  One of the literal givens with model car kits, at least in this country is that, save perhaps for Corvettes, probably pony cars as well, convertible kits have NEVER sold nearly as well as their hardtop stablemates.

Art

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A series of Indy 500 Pace Car models representing the '50s through '70s would do well.         

I'll go along with that!!

If nothing else, just for the Desoto & the Merc!

 

Steve

 

 

 

I suspect some would, most probably would not.  One of the literal givens with model car kits, at least in this country is that, save perhaps for Corvettes, probably pony cars as well, convertible kits have NEVER sold nearly as well as their hardtop stablemates.

Art

I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

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CA15_r0187_01-700x347.jpg 1954 Kaiser Manhattan Supercharged SedanKaiser-engine.jpgCA15_r0187_04.jpg

I'd have to pass on that, but would buy these.........   

438101_15581456_1956_Packard_Clipper.jpg

158096_10902079_1961_Chrysler_300G.jpg

Yes, please. In multiples. That Packard would actually make a good move, I think. Lots of customizing opportunities, as well as people who do stock. 

Don't like the Kaiser? Make a custom out of it. I've seen some pictures of these customized, not bad looking, but not my thing. I like them stock. 

A '61 Chrysler would be pretty cool, too. Forward-Look cars are popular with just about everyone. 

Charlie Larkin

Charlie Larkin

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A good test of market demand for the pace cars would be AMT's '64 Mustang.  I think the '69 Camaro SS kit did well.  I know the '68 Torino GT kit goes for a high price when listed on Ebay.  The Camaro pace car promos of '67 and '69 go for high prices in excellent condition.  

Regarding the Skylark, AMT could re-issue the '54.  I have a nice die cast '53 Skylark in probably 1/28th scale.  I think it's the same scale as the '53 Eldorado I have.  A '53 Skylark would be a great Moebius kit in 1/25th, along with the Olds Fiesta and '53-'56 Packard Caribbeans, '57 Bonneville, and '56-'57 Fury and Desoto Adventurer.  Going back further, why isn't any '41 Buick or Cadillac, '40 LaSalle, or Chrysler Town & Country being done?   

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I would love a Kaiser and buy one or more in a heartbeat, but I'm not sure that they would sell well, but then I guess the same could be said of their bold move with the Hudsons.  I would think that a good move on their part would be a 61 Ventura 4 door hardtop or Catalina station wagon.  Equip the wagon with a realistic trailer hitch for hauling the 2 door hardtop to the drags.  I could also see a Desoto variant off of their 55/56 Chryslers.

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A good test of market demand for the pace cars would be AMT's '64 Mustang.  I think the '69 Camaro SS kit did well.  I know the '68 Torino GT kit goes for a high price when listed on Ebay.  The Camaro pace car promos of '67 and '69 go for high prices in excellent condition.  

Regarding the Skylark, AMT could re-issue the '54.  I have a nice die cast '53 Skylark in probably 1/28th scale.  I think it's the same scale as the '53 Eldorado I have.  A '53 Skylark would be a great Moebius kit in 1/25th, along with the Olds Fiesta and '53-'56 Packard Caribbeans, '57 Bonneville, and '56-'57 Fury and Desoto Adventurer.  Going back further, why isn't any '41 Buick or Cadillac, '40 LaSalle, or Chrysler Town & Country being done?   

Ebay values bear very little similarity to the world of mass production, mass sales of model kits.  When I see several THOUSAND bids on a model kit on the 'Bay, I may well change my thoughts on this.

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A  Moebius-quality detailed '53-'54 Studebaker Champion/Commander pillar coupe (like the Miss Deal body) would be a winner.  To milk the investment from the mold, it could later be produced as a '55-'57 Champion/Commander coupe, Starlite HT, Sport, then morph into the Hawk series (Hawk, Silver Hawk, Golden Hawk) in its various forms from '58 - '62.  Great cars, great variations, great multiple issues ~ not even counting the stock, custom, gasser, variations. 

If they do it, I'll go broke!   

 

PS:  Even the screwball '58 Packard 'catfish' that was based on the Loewy coupe platform.

Edited by Danno
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A series of Indy 500 Pace Car models representing the '50s through '70s would do well.         

I'll go along with that!!

If nothing else, just for the Desoto & the Merc!

 

Steve

 

 

 

I suspect some would, most probably would not.  One of the literal givens with model car kits, at least in this country is that, save perhaps for Corvettes, probably pony cars as well, convertible kits have NEVER sold nearly as well as their hardtop stablemates.

Art

I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

Steve, this comes from my 30 years behind the counter in a couple of hobby shops.  Trust me, convertible kits as we know them, never did sell in nearly the same numbers as their hardtop stablemates (but then, neither did they in the 1:1 world either.

 

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Please, no Kaisers! Other than a Henry J that could be built stock. Kaisers, Frazers, and Henry Js are all interesting, but I don't see and any full-size Kaiser, or Frazer, selling well as model kit. Lack of racing history in real life is part of it. But not all.

There are so many better suggestions posted here. I would love a '60 Chrysler 300F (preferably a convertible). A 1st generation Econoline or Corvair 85 van or pickup truck would be very cool. If in van form, I'd like to see the option of a window version the Club Wagon or a Greenbiar, or a camper conversion of some sort. A modern tooling of a Dodge A-100 would work too.

And I of course keep hoping that the stories about JoHan's dies be destroyed or damaged are not true. I'd love to see the old JoHan '60 DeSoto and Plymouth wagon come back. The '62 Chrysler 300 hardtop, Dodge Dart and Plymouth convertibles would be welcome too. And let's not forget their Olds F-85 wagon. Love those long roofs.

Like I say, Kaiser are cool in their own way. My paternal grandfather once traded a lake cabin for a new Kaiser. But, even with the supercharger, they were still not fast cars. And not many were raced. Unlike the Hudsons, I don't see them being big seller. Even though I'd buy one.

 

Scott

 

Oh, by the way. Any '56 Packard, Clipper or senior series, would be very cool too. And I'm still waiting for a bullet nose Studebaker. Make it a '51. The first year for Studes' V-8.

 

Scott

 

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I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

Didn't that have more to do with one or the other being molded first, and survival of leftover stock, or something like that?

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A series of Indy 500 Pace Car models representing the '50s through '70s would do well.         

I'll go along with that!!

If nothing else, just for the Desoto & the Merc!

 

Steve

 

 

 

I suspect some would, most probably would not.  One of the literal givens with model car kits, at least in this country is that, save perhaps for Corvettes, probably pony cars as well, convertible kits have NEVER sold nearly as well as their hardtop stablemates.

Art

I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

Steve, this comes from my 30 years behind the counter in a couple of hobby shops.  Trust me, convertible kits as we know them, never did sell in nearly the same numbers as their hardtop stablemates (but then, neither did they in the 1:1 world either.

 

A series of Indy 500 Pace Car models representing the '50s through '70s would do well.         

I'll go along with that!!

If nothing else, just for the Desoto & the Merc!

 

Steve

 

 

 

I suspect some would, most probably would not.  One of the literal givens with model car kits, at least in this country is that, save perhaps for Corvettes, probably pony cars as well, convertible kits have NEVER sold nearly as well as their hardtop stablemates.

Art

I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

Steve, this comes from my 30 years behind the counter in a couple of hobby shops.  Trust me, convertible kits as we know them, never did sell in nearly the same numbers as their hardtop stablemates (but then, neither did they in the 1:1 world either.

 

A series of Indy 500 Pace Car models representing the '50s through '70s would do well.         

I'll go along with that!!

If nothing else, just for the Desoto & the Merc!

 

Steve

 

 

 

I suspect some would, most probably would not.  One of the literal givens with model car kits, at least in this country is that, save perhaps for Corvettes, probably pony cars as well, convertible kits have NEVER sold nearly as well as their hardtop stablemates.

Art

I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

Steve, this comes from my 30 years behind the counter in a couple of hobby shops.  Trust me, convertible kits as we know them, never did sell in nearly the same numbers as their hardtop stablemates (but then, neither did they in the 1:1 world either.

 

I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

Didn't that have more to do with one or the other being molded first, and survival of leftover stock, or something like

Any insight as to why the '58 through '61 annual convertible kits seem to be so much more plentiful than the hardtops?

Whether they be in the box kits, built ups or glue bombs, the hardtops seem to be much harder to come by.

 

Steve

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A series of Indy 500 Pace Car models representing the '50s through '70s would do well.         

I'll go along with that!!

If nothing else, just for the Desoto & the Merc!

 

Steve

 

 

 

I suspect some would, most probably would not.  One of the literal givens with model car kits, at least in this country is that, save perhaps for Corvettes, probably pony cars as well, convertible kits have NEVER sold nearly as well as their hardtop stablemates.

Art

I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

Steve, this comes from my 30 years behind the counter in a couple of hobby shops.  Trust me, convertible kits as we know them, never did sell in nearly the same numbers as their hardtop stablemates (but then, neither did they in the 1:1 world either.

 

 

A series of Indy 500 Pace Car models representing the '50s through '70s would do well.         

I'll go along with that!!

If nothing else, just for the Desoto & the Merc!

 

Steve

 

 

 

I suspect some would, most probably would not.  One of the literal givens with model car kits, at least in this country is that, save perhaps for Corvettes, probably pony cars as well, convertible kits have NEVER sold nearly as well as their hardtop stablemates.

Art

I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

Steve, this comes from my 30 years behind the counter in a couple of hobby shops.  Trust me, convertible kits as we know them, never did sell in nearly the same numbers as their hardtop stablemates (but then, neither did they in the 1:1 world either.

 

 

A series of Indy 500 Pace Car models representing the '50s through '70s would do well.         

I'll go along with that!!

If nothing else, just for the Desoto & the Merc!

 

Steve

 

 

 

I suspect some would, most probably would not.  One of the literal givens with model car kits, at least in this country is that, save perhaps for Corvettes, probably pony cars as well, convertible kits have NEVER sold nearly as well as their hardtop stablemates.

Art

I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

Steve, this comes from my 30 years behind the counter in a couple of hobby shops.  Trust me, convertible kits as we know them, never did sell in nearly the same numbers as their hardtop stablemates (but then, neither did they in the 1:1 world either.

 

 

I have no evidence to dispute that Art, but I find it a little hard to believe. At least the "never" part.

I had always assumed that the convertible kits sold much better in the late 50s & early 60s at least.

Convertibles are relatively easy to find on places like ebay, but have you ever tried to find hardtops like a '58 Ford, '60 Merc, '61 Ford Starliner, etc?

They can be very scarce. '60 Mercury convertibles, as an example, are relatively plentiful compared to the hardtop kits.

 

Steve

Didn't that have more to do with one or the other being molded first, and survival of leftover stock, or something like

Any insight as to why the '58 through '61 annual convertible kits seem to be so much more plentiful than the hardtops?

Whether they be in the box kits, built ups or glue bombs, the hardtops seem to be much harder to come by.

 

Steve

Simple answer:  Convertible kits were nowhere nearly as popular back when those kits were produced--lots of leftover stock every model year--prime candidates for downtown sidewalk sales.  Same with building them.

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