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what glue do you use


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i have used several different types of glues through the years, even crazy glue at one point. i finally settled on a glue made by "Crazy Glue" called "Fix All Adhesive". it's strong, yet flexible. if the need ever arises, it can be taken apart with little effort, and the dried glue can be easily scraped off. i use a toothpick to apply. just curious what others use, and opinions on them.

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Most of the time I have used Devcon 5-Minute Epoxy over the years and like it a lot. It has a strong bond and dries clear. It's great for gluing in windshields and also for different materials like plug wires, and guitar strings for antennas and for "pinning" smaller items like outside mirrors. I don't have to take a "repair kit" with me anymore when I bring my models to display at club meetings and NNLs.

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Depends on what i'm gluing...

Most areas of unpainted styrene. plastic...engine, heads, trans, or anything that will be painted later, straight up Testors Liquid. Works just fine.PLUS you have a short time frame to position it right.

If it's an area that needs a little more time to set in the position I need...Testors Liquid, 50%, with a mix of 50% Testors Tube stirred  in, OR Super Glue/Krazy Glue Gel.

Metal to styrene  or metal to metal? SG or KG Gel.

Painted parts, that need to be "scraped" at the attached point? Same Testors Liquid.

If I want parts to be literally "welded" together...Tenax Z7.  Mostly used on aircraft seams. Bad stuff.

Lastly, clear parts? Aleenes "Tacky Glue". Holds the part . Dries clear.

I can buy a years worth of all, for what some of the exotic glues cost in a month.

 

 

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Depends on what i'm gluing...

Most areas of unpainted styrene. plastic...engine, heads, trans, or anything that will be painted later, straight up Testors Liquid. Works just fine.PLUS you have a short time frame to position it right.

If it's an area that needs a little more time to set in the position I need...Testors Liquid, 50%, with a mix of 50% Testors Tube stirred  in, OR Super Glue/Krazy Glue Gel.

Metal to styrene  or metal to metal? SG or KG Gel.

Painted parts, that need to be "scraped" at the attached point? Same Testors Liquid.

If I want parts to be literally "welded" together...Tenax Z7.  Mostly used on aircraft seams. Bad stuff.

Lastly, clear parts? Aleenes "Tacky Glue". Holds the part . Dries clear.

I can buy a years worth of all, for what some of the exotic glues cost in a month.

 

 

thank you Phillip, some very good/specific info there. will do a cut and paste of your reply for future reference :)

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Thanks Carl.  I was getting to think I was the only builder to be using Testors tube glue.

You guys aren't alone, I still use Testors tube glue to some extent on every model I build. At the very least I use it to bond engine halves together and other non-structural purposes. I don't know why so many people turn their nose up at it because when used correctly it's a very good glue.

I also use Zap-A-Gap, especially for custom chassis work on old hot rods where you need the parts to attach immediately. 

B)

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Depends on the specific situation.

For general all-around building, liquid glue (I use Plastrtuct Bondene). Clamp the parts to be glued together, and "paint" the seam with liquid cement. It flows into the seam and "welds" the parts together. No messy "squeeze out" or "strings" like you get with tube glue.

For certain other situations, like where parts fit is sloppy or I need to fill the area with something solid...5-minute epoxy.

Tube glue if I am gluing a small part in place that needs to be held in position as it dries. Example: side view mirrors. A tiny dab of tube glue on the glue surface of the mirror, than place the mirror in position. The tube glue is thick enough to hold a small part like that in position as it dries, liquid cement wouldn't work well in this instance.

CA glue in certain situations, or if bonding dissimilar materials (brass to plastic, wood to plastic, etc.)

For windows that fit well, small trim pieces, chrome emblems, anything that needs to be placed on a flat, smooth, usually painted surface: clear acrylic. I use "Future" clear acrylic (it's actually meant to be used on tile or hardwood floors). One bottle of the stuff will last forever.

Those are what I use: Liquid cement for 90% of building, epoxy, tube glue, or CA in certain specific situations, and clear acrylic.

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As mentioned several times it depends on the situation. 

plastic to plastic I use either testors liquid glue or Texan and similar types of glues

for all other types of bonding that does not involve clear parts I will usually use Bob Smith CA or an epoxy.

I have recently started to use canopy glue for any joint that involves clear parts. so far I have had excellent luck with it as it drys clears and is easy to clear if you get any on the part.

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