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Should a buffing metalizer be extremely difficult to buff?


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Painted some panels with model masters/testors aluminum plate metalizer (spray can) and let it dry for about 2 days and then tried to buff it... MAN what a pain in the butt!! I am using a paper towel as that's the only thing I've found that will really do anything. I've buffed for quite a while, and the only way I can get it to start changing is if I push down hard, and go fast to create friction/heat. 

Were my spray coats too wet? Should I respray and just dust it?

Can I use an aluminum polish?

At the rate I'm going I wouldn't be done by next month and I'll probably break the parts doing it!

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I use the buffing MM rattle can stuff all the time, never had a problem. I usually can buf fit it an about an hour ( sometimes less )

 

Are you  sure its the buffing type ? ,,there is a non buffing version ( never used it so cant comment about it )

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It's always worked very well for me, though I disagree with the instructions on the Testors website.

If your product is definitely "Aluminum Plate", it should be the "buffing" variety if it's packaged correctly. There IS a non-buffing aluminum, but it doesn't say "Plate" or "buffing" on the label.

The web instructions say it must be shot over bare plastic, which is total bull. Whatever you shoot it over needs to be extremely smooth though...like 1500 grit.

The web instructions also recommend shooting their sealer over it. More bull. All the sealer does is ruin the bare-metal effect and make it look like silver paint.

I let my buffing metalizers dry MUCH longer than the 10 minutes that's recommended...sometimes as much as 2 days, like you. It does get more durable the longer it dries, but still buffs up beautifully...or always has for me, anyway. You can go back months or years later and buff it up again if it's dulled with time...which it sometimes will.

To get the best polished-metal effect, it needs to be shot wet, almost on the verge of running, so it will slick out smooth. Spraying dry mist coats will create a pebbly, grainy surface texture that looks a lot like cast aluminum, but that will not buff up to look like polished, machined aluminum.

The fleece on the inside of old-style cotton sweatshirts has worked best for me, to polish it.

 

Edited by Ace-Garageguy
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I tried a microfiber towel at first and couldnt put enough friction to it because of that. So then I switched to a paper towel and started getting results. But there's a fine line between too much and not enough... and it's very tiring and gets rather warm! I'll post a picture... just a sec.

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You should be able to buff out that part in about 2 minutes.

Something is obviously amiss.

make sure you used the correct "Buffing Metalizer".

If not, get some & go right over the top of it & try again.

I've never had this sort of problem with metalizer paints either.

usually it will come off right on your fingers just from regular handling.

 

Steve

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Outside the box. As an alternative; chrome BMF rubbed lightly with 4-0 steel wool or gray scuff pad. Let your touch determine how distressed you want it. It will have that metallic sheen coming through.

Could also polish with Novus or similar if you want more sheen...

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I tried bmf... and it looked great until the panel bowed in (since the ends are curved ) which it then became wrinkle city and I wasteda half sheet of bmf. 

I said forget it and took my red scuff pad gently to it and now it as a brushed aluminum effect. Good enough.... not going thru that again any time soon. And yes, everyone, it was a buffing metalizer

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  • 7 months later...

Hey guys I'm new to the forum but I'd like to share a little info I've come across using testors metalizer, specifically the aluminum plate buffing version. I've found with the aluminum plate buffing metalizer that you can clear over it without losing your buffed effect/finish. I had to let it cure/gas off for around 3 weeks-1month. The clear coat I used is nason 403-00 acrylic trim and jamb clear. It comes in a rattle can and I got it at my local Oreillys auto parts. It will be in the back behind the counter. You'll have to ask for it. Hope this helps. 

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I use Aluminum Plate buffing metalizer all the time. I don't lay it on thick like Bill suggested, though... just a light-ish coat. I usually buff it out just minutes after spraying... has always worked for me.

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You need to get the metal particles pressed down into the carrier before it gets too hard to do so, as you've found out

I never wait longer than ~45 minutes

The aluminum plate will buff out to the highest shine, but is more finicky and delicate than the stainless steel

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You need to get the metal particles pressed down into the carrier before it gets too hard to do so, as you've found out

I never wait longer than ~45 minutes

The aluminum plate will buff out to the highest shine, but is more finicky and delicate than the stainless steel

We must be doing it differently.  :D

I don't find it to be "finicky" at all unless I try to buff it too soon, when it's still soft.

I wait as long as two days. Never a problem. I'll post some pix of a recent aircraft engine cowling project for verification.

PS. A part I shot two weeks ago will still buff up to a higher sheen. I just tried it. BUT...the metalizer is FAR less sensitive to rubbing off and fingerprinting now.

PPS. I'll do some testing over the weekend. I have several parts to "metalize" that will be largely hidden on a large-scale model. I can experiment 'cause they don't have to be perfect. I'll time the dry times after application and photograph the buffing results. 

Edited by Ace-Garageguy
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OK. Experiment one. The cowl on this model and the fuselage upper panel were painted on the same 80-degree day at around 50% humidity, at the same time, from the same can. 

The cowl, which looks pretty much like polished aluminum, was shot WET, 3 coats, and allowed to dry for two hours prior to polishing. Prep was limited to bare plastic scuffed with Comet, hot water and a toothbrush, followed by a 70% isopropyl alcohol wash.

The upper fuselage panel was shot relatively DRY (resulting in a slightly textured finish), 3 coats, and was buffed after 20 minutes. No amount of buffing will bring it to a polished-metal shine...and it was sensitive to scratching because it was still wet.

 

 

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