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30 Ford Visor holes


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Lay the centers out carefully and drill exact-center pilot holes with a pin-vise and small-diameter bit, maybe .030" or .040"

You don't need a pin-vise to use twist drills to enlarge the holes in styrene. Fingers work just fine. Use SHARP bits. Don't be in a hurry and don't press too hard, which will tend to tear the plastic and run the bit off center. If you can get bits made specifically for drilling into plexi, they have a different taper on the flutes and will tend to stay on center better without tearing or getting caught.

Two notes: few things look stupider than unevenly-spaced holes, and visors that haven't been thinned to approximate scale thickness.

I've seen plenty of model visors that would be 1" thick if scaled up. Wrong.

 

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good point about thinning it out. seems like a bit of work. I suppose on severe chop jobs the holes improved visibility? Still on the fence about them.

Even on a car with a stock height roof if you are first or second in line at a traffic light, you have to bend your head down to look up to be able to see the traffic lights. I have gone a lot of miles in behind the wheel of a 30 A Coupe and they are a lot of fun to drive but you have to learn how to drive them. it is a lot like riding a motorcycle. People in big trucks and idiots in their cars don't even see you so you have to drive defensively and be hyper aware all the time.

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If the visor is there to keep the sun out of your eyes (I assume)... doesn't drilling a bunch of holes in it totally defeat the purpose?

Lotsa things on custom cars and hot-rods "defeat the purpose" of elements of the original design. 

The driving position is SO different in a chopped / channeled car from what it was in a stocker that it's kindof a moot point anyway (as to whether the visor still has any actual function). 

A lot of these cars, like this one built by the last shop I contracted to, are run with the roof center made to be removable. You can see the traffic signals by simply looking up.

                                                                         Image result for josh mills chopped '30 Ford coupe

And then, the '32 Fords dispensed with the visor entirely, with no adverse effects.

1932-ford-standard-coupe.jpg

Edited by Ace-Garageguy
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PS. I sure would like to know what that compound-curved fill panel on the OP photo was scrounged from. Obviously cut from the roof section of something else. That's BY FAR the easiest way to do it on a 1:1, and about the ONLY way do do a nice clean job if you don't have access to an English wheel.

EDIT: I LOVE Google. I did a reverse image search and found the original build thread on that car. The roof section is from a Volvo 122.  :D

                                               Image result for volvo 122

Edited by Ace-Garageguy
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just another way to do the same thing...

Layout and drill the small pilot holes like Bill suggested, but drill the final hole undersize.. My drilled holes always end up a little bit out of line.  Using a fine round tapered needle file allows adjustment in the final size and location.  The plastic filings on the file act kind of like a depth gauge so the holes all end up consistent diameter on the taper.

Replicas and Miniatures has a drilled visor in their excellent chopped Model A body for the 1/24 Monogram kit - I wonder if Norm will make one for the new Revell kit...

 

Edited by Muncie
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just another way to do the same thing...

Layout and drill the small pilot holes like Bill suggested, but drill the final hole undersize.. My drilled holes always end up a little bit out of line.  Using a fine round tapered needle file allows adjustment in the final size and location.  The plastic filings on the file act kind of like a depth gauge so the holes all end up consistent diameter on the taper.

:D He's absolutely right. Finishing with a round file does indeed usually make a nicer, better located and rounder hole...especially if you don't have the more pointed bits made for plexi.

Step drills also tend to make rounder holes, if you can find them in small diameters and if you get your centers dead on.

Image result for small step drills

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PS. I sure would like to know what that compound-curved fill panel on the OP photo was scrounged from. Obviously cut from the roof section of something else. That's BY FAR the easiest way to do it on a 1:1, and about the ONLY way do do a nice clean job if you don't have access to an English wheel.

Ace, We filled the roof on our 30 coupe as well. We used the roof panel out of an 81 malibu 4dr sedan. Used the rear 2/3rds of the roof skin turned 180°. Matched the compound curves of the car perfectly. Probably a lot easier to find than a Volvo 122 roof if you are going to fill a roof.

 

DSCN0055.jpg

Edited by Toner283
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I like to use Dremel ball bits for large diameter holes.  Mount them in a pine vise or just turn them with your fingers.  Do not use a motor tool!  I also use them to put a little chamfer around a smaller hole.

Dremel%20Rotary%20Tool%20Bit%20114%20(EN

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Ace, We filled the roof on our 30 coupe as well. We used the roof panel out of an 81 malibu 4dr sedan. Used the rear 2/3rds of the roof skin turned 180°. Matched the compound curves of the car perfectly. Probably a lot easier to find than a Volvo 122 roof if you are going to fill a roof.

THANKS !   That's a great one to have filed away. That roof stamping must be on millions of that era GM cars.   :D

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Lay out and drill the holes with a small drill bit, then use a brad point bit to drill the larger holes.

Another good suggestion. For those who don't know, "brad point" drill bits have a small projection that keeps the bit centered in the pilot hole, and differently designed flutes that 'machine' material away without so much risk of gouging and splitting. They're used to make a nice round hole where a common twist-drill has a chance of making a slightly elongated hole, and 'skating' away from the pilot hole.

Again, you don't want to force it. Twisting carefully by hand will give the best results in thin plastic.

                                         Image result for brad point bit

 

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