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Duplicolor primers too hot for current-production kits?


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I enjoy not having any worries when it comes to primer. 

I used to, but the new-improved trash plastic everybody is using now has made that a thing of the past...unless I completely re-think my primering protocols and materials.

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I used to, but the new-improved trash plastic everybody is using now has made that a thing of the past...unless I completely re-think my primering protocols and materials.

's funny, as I have used Duplicolor primer on all of my builds for years, INCLUDING modern-made kits done in that "new-improved trash plastic, with no problems at all.

Art

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I use the Martin Senour Tech Nique brand from Napa Available in Three colors, Easy to obtain, Not to expensive, Empties the entire can, comparable to both Duplicolor and Plasticote. I painted the new Revell 29 roadster with it and it did not craze.

NWMDC.jpeg

Edited by my80malibu
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's funny, as I have used Duplicolor primer on all of my builds for years, INCLUDING modern-made kits done in that "new-improved trash plastic, with no problems at all.

Art

You've already explained that YOU have been decanting and airbrushing, while I have been able to shoot it straight from the can all these years.

Nothing funny about it.

The plastic composition has changed. Either that, or the solvents in the rattlecan primers are hotter.

The blue Chevelle body is older Revell. In 2012, I shot it with Duplicolor primers over extensive bodywork (which usually exacerbates crazing if it's going to happen).

Image result for ace-garageguy 70 chevelle

NO PROBLEM. Shot WET and SLICK to avoid orange-peel.

Image result for ace-garageguy 70 chevelle

In 2014, I shot the hood of this Revell '50 Olds with all Duplicolor products. I encountered SLIGHT primer crazing only in the center of the hood where I had removed the peak. It was relatively easy to correct, with NO crazing anywhere else on the hood. Again, shot WET and slick to avoid orange-peel...straight from the can.

Image result for ace-garageguy 70 chevelle

Within the last 60 days, I shot a new Revell '30 coupe body using the exact same techniques and Duplicolor product. It crazed so badly it can only be used for a 'rusty' project.

Obvious conclusion: less solvent-resistant plastic.

 

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This is very interesting to me.  In the last couple years, I went through a separation and divorce, etc.  I lost access to my airbrush and haven't had time to set it up since getting resettled recently.  So I'm rattle-canning til I can get the airbrush workstation set back up.  I used to use Plastikote and had no worries, from the can or decanted.  But now I have been using the Rustoleum/Duplicolor stuff (I call it BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH) from WalMart or AutoZone.  Just can't get the results I used to,  I hate having to experiment to re-learn with the new materrials.  I don;t have the cash to buy 3 or 4 kits to waste the bodies.  

The closest HL is almost an hour away.  The LHS is 30 minutes away and always a BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH shoot as to what they will actually have on any given day.  Only time I can get there is Saturday as well.  And that's my time to do Honey dos most weeks.  

I would be very interested in Ace's rattle can techniques to help me get better can finishes.  When I spray wet out of a can, that is usually a bad outcome.  And it may be the primer I'm on now.  Eventually I will get my airbrush set back up and try Art's methods.  Most of which I'm close to but probably need to lower the pressure more from what I used to use.  Great thread on paints and techniques, folks.  Thanks.

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I would be very interested in Ace's rattle can techniques to help me get better can finishes.  When I spray wet out of a can, that is usually a bad outcome.  And it may be the primer I'm on now.  Eventually I will get my airbrush set back up and try Art's methods.  Most of which I'm close to but probably need to lower the pressure more from what I used to use.  

I don't have a good rattlecan primer technique that will work on the softer plastics...yet.

Steve Guthmiller suggests shooting first coats of Tamiya primer as a barrier, and then using the more cost-effective Duplicolor primers over that.

I've bought both Tamiya "Fine" and "Surface" primers and will be experimenting in the near future. Steve's results are consistently first-rate, show quality.

I'm also beginning to believe the most reliable long-term fix is simply to go to Art Anderson's decanting and airbrushing techniques.

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I have used decanted paints for many years and that worked best.  But I got to say that being able to use a spray can is easier and quicker than the prep and cleanup required for proper airbrush use.  I will also be glad to get my airbrush set up running again to be able to paint other parts.   Nice to start a project being able to airbrush most everything and go back with detail brushes.  

We'll all figure it out eventually.  

 

 

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  • 1 year later...

Tamiya is definitely the best for plastic safe and fine grain finish. However I find that you do sometimes needs scratch filler primer like Duplicolor if you had to make a lot of corrections. Tamiya doesn’t have great filling qualities.

I recently used Duplicolora Sandable white with many layers and it turned out good. I had to cut it back with 800 grit before moving up though. Got a great paint job out of it though.

Duplicolor primer sealer seems like it could sub as a primer to me if you are looking for a cheap primer with very fine grain pattern. It is also darker than their filler version.

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  • 1 year later...
3 hours ago, modelman81 said:

Duplicolor primer sealer part# dap1699. I haven’t had any problems with this primer crazing the newer plastic. 

I love this stuff too!

Been using it on every build for the past couple of years!

But I have to admit, I did not know that it was not as hot as the Duplicolor sandable primers.

I've been treating it the same way, using the same safeguards as the sandable stuff. ^_^

 

 

Steve

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