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Has anyone thought about a way to filter the metallic bits out of Testors paint?


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Yes, it's a serious question, and it's based on the fact that I'd love to use the majority of colors in Testors' One Coat line, but I can't get past the enormous flake size in some of them.  

I don't have the type of brain that could conceive of a way to make this type of filtration possible, but having seen some amazingly creative solutions on here over the years, it wouldn't surprise me if some of our brainier people chimed in with a great idea or two.  

 

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If the flakes are ferric (iron) wrap some saran wrap around a magnet and immerse the magnet in the paint. Ferric particles will be attracted to the magnet...remove the magnet from the paint, then the saran wrap from the magnet. The saran wrap makes it easy to clean the magnet and the flakes are not stuck to the magnet.

This same approach works for those time when you drop a box of nuts/bolts, paper clips, etc. and is especially better when dealing with Xacto blades. Use the lid from a chip dip container instead of saran wrap...set the lid over the parts, place the magnet on the lid, move the lid to a box/cup/etc. and remove the magnet. All the parts are now in the box and you don't have to mess with the magnet. Repeat as necessary.

 

Edited by BigTallDad
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I think you'll probably find that most metallic and metalflake "flakes" are either light-metal (NON-FERROUS) or these days, synthetic materials like solvent-resistant polyesters.

The sparkly additives are down in the few-thousandths-of-an-inch (or smaller for micas and pearls), so something pretty damm "fine" is going to be necessary to remove them.

Obviously, a normal paint filter you get at the body-shop-supply outlet won't do it, as they're designed to PASS flakes the size of what are in Testors "One-Coat" products...which look just fine on real cars.

If I were going to experiment, I'd start with something like a paper coffee filter. They come in different materials (none of which I've tried to filter paint with) and obviously allow some color to pass while removing particles.

I'd also think about trying finely woven polyester or nylon fabrics. I've had great success filtering many forms of solvent-carried materials (like polyester and epoxy resins) by using pantyhose.

There are also woven stainless-steel screen products that go very fine for industrial filtering applications of solvent-carried products.

One problem you MAY encounter is that because metallic paints get a lot of their color from the color of the flakes themselves, even if you do succeed in removing them, you may very well find that all you end up with is a tinted clear that won't cover very well.

Another option: competent automotive paint outlets ought to be able to custom-match a particular color you want, but mix it with the smallest available flake size.

There are also some model-car-specific paint manufacturers that can do the same thing in smaller quantities.

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Another option: competent automotive paint outlets ought to be able to custom-match a particular color you want, but mix it with the smallest available flake size.

There are also some model-car-specific paint manufacturers that can do the same thing in smaller quantities.

That was my thought.

Is it really worth the effort when there are so many great paint options out there?

Testors paints aren't all that great to start with, regardless of the metallic particle size.

 

Steve

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I wholeheartedly agree that the metallic particles in that line of paints are way too large (especially on a 1:43 scale models)!  What were they thinking when they came out with that line of paints?  :wacko:  This problem is especially noticeable when taking photos of those models. They look like dune buggies or bass boats with metal-flake finish.

As mentioned, often the metallic flakes themselves contribute to the final color of the paint (they aren't always just gold or silver).

I don't think straining will work (even if you found mesh with opening small enough to prevent the particles from passing through. Why? because the mes will quickly clog with the metallic particles  and won't pass any of the liquid through. The other problem is that paint is so viscous that it will not be able to easily pass through those small openings in the mesh.

I have a piece of mesh on the end of the suction tube of my airbrush and it also can clog with metallci particles wile I'm painting (using metallics with very fine particles).

What you could try is to let the paint sit for few days. Metallic particles usually settle down on the bottom of the jar. Then just pour the top part of the paint out into another jar.  But if there is some pigment, that might also be on the bottom of the jar.

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I agree with what everyone has said except for the magnet thing (I seriously doubt any paint manufacturer would used something that can rust). Beside that, it's doubtful you would ever get all off the flakes out of the paint, and just the slightest amount of flake left would ruin your paintjob.

 

Basically it's just not practical to remove them, plus you are almost guaranteed to alter the color once the metallic flakes are removed.

 

Just a suggestion for a cheap alternative, nail polish. It can be found for as little as a buck a jar, and the colors available or just about limitless. If you do decide to try NP, remember that it is formulated to brush on a thick coat, so it might be very transparent when thinned to spray. I've had great success with craft acrylic as a base coat.

Edited by Psychographic
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I think Bill has the most viable idea. I've had my 1:1 paint matched several times. You might also consider laying down some clear over the One Coat and see how you like it. I've found that it seems to reduce the appearance of the obnoxious flake.

I've got a can of Krylon "Sparkle Green" that's almost a perfect match for 1972 Chevrolet and Pontiac Sprng/Julep Green, but it's got the "bass boat" flakes in it. I tried spraying Testor Dullcote over it, which brought the flakes down to a nice factory metallic appearance, but of course flat. Then I shot clear gloss over that and it brought the appearance right back to right from the can--MUCH too flaky/sparkly.

Still, I want to use the stuff, so I'm going to do a common AMT/MPC '72 GTO in the stuff, Dullcote it, and then lay on a few spots of primer and whatnot and build the thing as a late '70s "high school hot rod," beater, or maybe an all-bidness "street rat." (I'm also gonna do a Manx dune buggy in the Sparkle Green--looks like a match made in heaven.)

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