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There have been previous comments on this topic, but they usually went in other directions (I'm guilty of this).  Anyway, do we have any experts?  I am aware of two models, the NT-11 and P-22.  The GM model cars I have seen don't mention Philco on the chassis.    Here are the cars I am aware of:

1964-1968 Thunderbird (multiple colors) radio NT-11

1966 Mustang 2+2 (Antique Bronze, Signal Flare Red) radio P-22

1965 Dynamic 88 (Target Red) radio model unknown

1966 Impala SS (Aztec Bronze) radio model unknown

1966 Riviera (Shell Beige) radio model unknown

Chrysler Turbine Car (Turbine Bronze) radio model unknown

I haven't seen the Impala SS in this color as a regular promo.  Is it correct that Aztec Bronze was only used on the radio version?

Did I miss any models or colors?  

Does anyone have knowledge of who repairs these?

Thanks,

Jim

 

Thunderbird:

image.png.7fd37ea7a759a0974e65d2674181e6c8.png

Mustang:

image.png.6bf8d695be8f830648547a7404f6154f.png

Impala SS:

image.png.6c7fbe2b06b2c7fbe77becf23346bf38.png

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Over the years, I've seen a lot of T-bird radios listed as promos on eBay. I guess because they use the majority of the promo, they get called a promo. I've never seen the other ones, but I've never looked for other makes in promos.

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I've got 2 68 TBird radios, both tan in color. At least one of them works fine; the other may become fodder for a project. The kit fodder TBird has a lot of wear on the chrome and body. They look like they're identical to a "usual" promo, but the chassis/radio is obviously different. There is no interior, but there is a raised area on the inside for the speaker. I think the body/windows is shared with the annual kit.

Philco was owned by Ford from 1961-1973, so that probably explains why there's no Philco name on the GM promos.

 

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Years ago I owned a 1959 Caddy Eldorado convertible AM radio. It was roughtly 1:25 scale (or maybe slightly smaller). But it wasn't an "official" promo - it was made either in Japan or Hong Kong.

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About 20 years ago I used to have a light biue '67 Mustang fastback radio promo in very good shape (radio worked); picked it up at a flea market for $10 and sold it for $50 when I needed the money. Still have '64 and '67 T-bird radios.

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Here ya go guys!   I'll throw a hiccup into the mix..... ' 67 Ambassador.   Chrome exterior (bad tarnished) looks like the sales award type promos.....couldn't find any markings to ID radio mfg. 

I personally took this apart to redo for a friend to replicate his first car.

0709192242a.jpg

0709192241.jpg

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These are neat.  I've never seen the mid-60s cars as radios.

I'm not sure if it's Philco, but I've got a 1931 Rolls Royce Phantom II that is an AM radio.  The spare tires on each side are the controls, one for volume and the other for tuning.  It's packed up or I would post a pic.

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14 minutes ago, Motor City said:

s-l1600.jpgMs-l1600.jpg

Mark,

This was made in Hong Kong and Japan, was sold by Radio Shack, and is often listed as 1/18th scale (according to a few Ebay listings).

Yep, that's it.  Thanks for the info.  My Granddad gave it to me for Christmas sometime in the mid-70s.

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  • 1 year later...

Jim, I have 30 of these 1/25 Ford Promo Thunderbirds in my collection, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967 & 1968. Had a couple of Mustangs and one Buick, I think, maybe it was Olds, mainly for parts. Most of these models saw its old age of fifty plus years and almost all had non working radios. The P-22 radios seem to be of a better quality, yet, there's not that many of those around and if one comes on eBay, the asking price is most often unreasonable. Of all the models I have in my collection about 80% of the radios didn't work. Surprisingly, the non working radios are not the worst problem here. The often missing On-OFF & volume knob is. Go figure. I found a radio technician here in Houston who fixed all but one radio for me, not exactly an inexpensive task, on average about $60 a pop, yet all my radios works now, granted, there's not that many AM stations in Houston now as there were back in the sixties, but that's not the reason I collect these. The second most common problem with these radios is a damaged volume switch, the internal switch soldered in that chassis. This, and sometime the tuner, can't be had any more as a new part and be replaced, not even from a donor radio due to the transistor soldering construction. When the volume switch is defective I let my guy set the volume manually half way and I install a miniature toggle switch next to the radio inside in the front of the chassis in line of the battery power supply wire. Not the best solution, but there's not really that many choices here. Of a note, many of my models needed some minor and also serious restoration, paint, chrome parts refurbishing, missing parts replacements acquired from AMT model kits, still available on eBay, windshields,, chrome parts like the small front fender markers, the rear red stop light lenses, small screws with slotted heads, not Phillips heads, these don't seem to exist anymore.  You may ask why do I collect these? Had two of the Thunderbirds in real 1:1 scale, as a twenty two year old, back in 1969 a 1966 Thunderbird Town Landau, 390Cid, kept it for seven years, and a second one in 1998, another 1966 Town Hardtop 390Cid, again kept it for seven years, completely restored it, these cars were beautiful Ford models, there could be lot to say about these cars from a T-Bird guy, a car nut like myself, still, to bad this marque is not produced any more.  Should you be interested in contacting my radio guy, call him, Tom, Save On Sound, 713 957 9600.

Best of luck, Otto

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Posted (edited)
On 7/9/2019 at 6:31 PM, Motor City said:

I have updated this list.   I am aware of two models, the NT-11 and P-22.  The GM model cars I have seen don't mention Philco on the chassis.   Since Ford owned Philco at the time, GM probably didn't want it advertised on their model cars!  I remember seeing these retail for $29.95 at the time, which was a lot of money for a kid (me).

Here are the cars I am aware of:

1964 Thunderbird (multiple colors) radio NT-11

1964 Grand Prix

1964 Riviera

1964 XL

1965 Thunderbird (multiple colors) radio NT-11

1965 Impala SS

1965 Dynamic 88 (Target Red)

1966 Impala SS (Aztec Bronze) I haven't seen the Impala SS in this color as a regular promo.  Is it correct that Aztec Bronze was only used on the radio version?

1966 7-Litre

1966 Thunderbird (multiple colors) radio NT-11

1966 Continental

1966 Riviera (Shell Beige)

1966 Mustang 2+2 (Antique Bronze, Signal Flare Red) radio P-22

1967 Mustang 2+2

1967 Thunderbird (multiple colors) radio NT-11

1968 Thunderbird (multiple colors) radio NT-11

1967 Ambassador - unsure if this is a Philco radio

Chrysler Turbine Car (Turbine Bronze) unsure if this is a Philco radio

 

Thanks for the additional information, Otto, and Tom's contact information.  I should have mentioned Ford owning Philco at the time, so thanks for the reminder.  By the way, I own my grandparents' 1929 Philco Model 87 lowboy radio.  I pulled this photo off of the internet since it was faster than finding one of my radio.  1928 is when Philco started producing radios, and supposedly their 1929 radios were the first in the industry to use the conventional AM dial that we are accustomed to seeing today.  Prior to that, radio dials used a scale of 1-100.

 

Sold Price: PHILCO RADIO, lowboy model 87, c. 1929, with ...


 

 

 

 

Edited by Motor City
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I found a '67 T-Bird radio at a sale decades ago, and used to keep it on my desk when I worked at a Ford dealer. I should bring it out of storage and see if it still works (removed the battery before storing!)

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I have never seen one of these before bu my brother did have a red stage coach that was a radio and you would never know unless you looked close. I was a kid and I liked playing with it.

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