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Good afternoon guys
I need you're opinions and suggestions please! This Monza was painted with Model Master Insignia Yellow enamel thinned 2 parts paint to 1 part lacquer thinner. Harder & Steenbeck evolution with air pressure set to 20 psi.
HELP!!!!!

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Here's some information that may help...

It looks like there is a compatibility problem between the paint, primer, and plastic - the thinner in the paint is lifting the primer -  the thinner could be getting thru the primer and damaging the plastic in some areas.  Lacquer thinner will attack the plastic so the primer needs to be a good barrier.  A sealer will help (or prime with  something like Duplicolor's 1699 primer sealer).  This could also happen if the primer is thin and the sanding scratched thru the primer.

The texture in the paint looks like not enough thinner and too much pressure.  (so I also agree with Bob - the paint is dry before it gets to the body)  With the paint and air brush that I use it's 3 parts thinner to 2 parts paint and 18 psi sprayed at a distance of 8 to 12 inches.  Sometimes weather conditions require adjustment to the mix.  

Donn Yost has a video available with good information about painting with Model Master enamel and lacquer thinner - his techniques work - there are also lots of YouTube videos.

Bottom line is if you ask fifteen model builders how to paint, you will get 25 different answers.   Keep working with it and learn the materials and techniques until it works for you.

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That has nothing to do with the primer below lifting or anything like that . It is clearly in the color coat but what exactly it is not sure . You sure it's not just dust that was in the air ??

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Looks to me like it’s drying out before it gets to the body. I would think one of two things possibly. Either switch to enamel reducer from the lacquer to slow the drying and/or turn you air pressure down a little to let the paint flow better. That would be my guess from what I see...

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I've shot Model Master Insignia Yellow thinned with lacquer thinner many, many times, over primer and not, and never seen anything like this. (It doesn't attack the plastic, either--the LT evaporates off long before it causes any damage.)

I thin at least 1:1 and with MM enamels often have to go up to 2 parts thinner to 1 part paint. 

I shoot at 24 to 30 PSI and don't pay much attention to where in there the pressure is. If the paint's flowin', I'm blowin'. 

Are you absolutely certain you used MM enamel and not their acrylic? Some of their labeling is very similar these days. :unsure:

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As an addendum,  I was beginning the striping process and I noticed that the paint I had sprayed on the underside of the room rubbed off just like powder. 

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1 hour ago, Snake45 said:

Are you absolutely certain you used MM enamel and not their acrylic? Some of their labeling is very similar these days. :unsure:

That is my thought as well.

This is a major mess!

I've never seen anything like this with MM enamel and lacquer thinner.

 

 

 

Steve

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14 hours ago, Muncie said:

 

Bottom line is if you ask fifteen model builders how to paint, you will get 25 different answers.   Keep working with it and learn the materials and techniques until it works for you.

Best advice yet! What works for one or some doesn't work for all. You have to develop your own method. Once you have a method down, paint work will be easy.

Instances like this is one of the many reasons I don't use an airbrush. 

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1 hour ago, Plowboy said:

Instances like this is one of the many reasons I don't use an airbrush. 

Spray cans may be simpler, but it’s not the airbrush’s fault. I believe it is a compatibility issue. There is definitely a learning curve though!

Edited by NOBLNG
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Well if it is indeed enamel I suggest thinning more for one thing but it almost looks like you mixed lacquer thinner in MM acrylic as others mentioned..... Are you sure it's enamel and also enamel that hasn't gone bad ? I've shot this combo and Chrome yellow many times, it comes out looking like glass, you can see yourself in the finish. I shoot it over primer but it will go down to bare plastic too. I thin just short of 1/1, so like 55/45 paint to thinner.

One more thing, this isn't the new green formula synthetic lacquer thinner that's out these days is it ? You need the good old fashioned stuff.

What primer did you use ? Was it good and dry ?

Edited by Dave G.
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1 hour ago, NOBLNG said:

Spray cans may be simpler, but it’s not the airbrush’s fault. I believe it is a compatibility issue. There is definitely a learning curve though!

Of course it isn't the fault of the airbrush. It's the issues associated with using one. Mixing paint, getting the right thinner, getting the right amount of thinner, air pressure etc. etc.

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5 hours ago, NOBLNG said:

Spray cans may be simpler, but it’s not the airbrush’s fault. I believe it is a compatibility issue. There is definitely a learning curve though!

Agreed.

The use of an airbrush has nothing whatsoever to do with this.

A spray can paint job can turn out horrible just as easily as with an airbrush.

I speak from experience. ;)

 

 

 

Steve

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3 hours ago, Plowboy said:

Of course it isn't the fault of the airbrush. It's the issues associated with using one. Mixing paint, getting the right thinner, getting the right amount of thinner, air pressure etc. etc.

Just as spray cans can have their own issues.

Bad paint, plugged or otherwise bad nozzles, plugged cans, missing propellant, leaking cans, spitting nozzles, etc, etc.

There are pros and cons to everything we do.

 

 

 

Steve

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On 5/9/2020 at 1:57 PM, Bigtrain said:

Model Master Insignia Yellow enamel

I googled this and there are at least a couple different versions.  Seems to me pics of the exact labels on the thinner and paint you used would  make the answer easier to come by.Testors Model Master Insignia Yellow Fs33538 1/2 Oz - Hobby And ModelAmazon.com: Insignia Yellow Enamel Paint .5 oz bottle FS 33538 ...

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Flat32 said:

I googled this and there are at least a couple different versions.  Seems to me pics of the exact labels on the thinner and paint you used would  make the answer easier to come by.Testors Model Master Insignia Yellow Fs33538 1/2 Oz - Hobby And ModelAmazon.com: Insignia Yellow Enamel Paint .5 oz bottle FS 33538 ...

 

 

Also, 33538 is going to be flat. The FS color number for gloss would be 13538. At one time Testor might have called this Chrome Yellow. 

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OP hasn't identified exactly what paint he used except for Model Master "Insignia Yellow" which is obviously wrong for a car being flat and not thinnible with laquer thinner if the acrylic version (is it also flat?).

. A photo of the label would clarify everything. 

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