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1970's Tribute Model A Roadster 351C Stake Bed Street Rod - Now Finished


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This model was inspired by a somewhat similar real car that appeared in a couple of different rod mags back in 1974-75.  The build combined the roadster pickup body from the Revell 1929 Model A Roadster/Closed Cab pickup kit with the 1932 Ford Highboy frame from the recent Revell 1929 Model A Roadster/1930 Model A Five Window kits.  (Of course, the Revell Ford Highboy frame was thoroughly massaged up front for a lower stance).

It carries a number of cues relating to the 1970's era, starting with the stake bed which was cut down from the parts in several of the AMT/Lindberg 1934 Ford Pickup kit releases.   A woodgrain decal was applied to the bed floor, followed by trips of Bare-Metal aluminum foil.  Amazingly, the under-bed structure from the AMT pickup kit fit the Highboy frame without modification.   (Longtime readers of my old Street Rodder Modeler's Corner column may remember back to the September, 1985 issue where I featured Stan Pinnick's 1940 Ford Pickup with a shorty stake bed, it was very much in the same idiom as this model).  

Next up, a 351 Cleveland V8 (yes, 351 Clevelands showed up in a number of higher-end rods back then, such as the black Wayne Henderson 1932 Ford Vicky that was extensively published back in the day).  But no matter what you may have read, there were really only two correct 1/25th scale 351 Clevelands - the one found in the Revell 1970 Mustang Mach 1 kit of about 15 years ago, and a no-longer-product aftermarket kit, the latter being the source for this model.   (I expect Revell's upcoming 1971 Mustang Boss 351 kit to be the third, and probably best, source for this engine). 

The interior was pieced together from the Revell 1932 Ford Roadster Highboy kit with a heavily modified parts box instrument panel. 

The front and rear wheels are from the c.1972 MPC Switchers kits (with a coat of Tamiya Semi-Gloss Clear for the polished aluminum (i/l/o plated chrome) appearance of 1970's Appliance Slot Mags).  The front tires are Revell Gasser Pirellis (Anglia kit et al) while the rears are Monogram Slicks (Beer Wagon et al).   

While I've wanted to build a model inspired by the real car ever since, well, 1974, this 1/25th scale project started around 2015 when I painted a Revell 1929 Model A Roadster Pickup body with MCW Automotive Finishes 1956 Ford Pine Ridge Green Metallic.  This was for an article in Model Cars Magazine in issue #201 (January, 2016) on historically accurate paint colors for traditional hot rod models.  (Famous hot rod/custom photographer Andy Southard used this exact color on his Model A Roadster pickup in the late 1950's).  But most of the work (beyond the initial body prep and painting) has occurred over the last month.  

Further comments accompany pictures below....

DSC 0372

On the image below, note that the apparent rough paint surface on the door is instead a reflection of the rust on my assembly plate below.  DSC 0370

The "Street is Neat" sticker and "Gotcha" license plate (a tribute to Tom Woodruff's famous "Gotcha Factor") further support the mid-1970's vibe.  I also have a stake rail (not shown) that fits across the back of the stake bed; it's a friction fit to the side rails.  

DSC 0373

No, I don't know what that green blob is on the bed floor. It's gone now!!!

DSC 0374

Looks like I still need to blow off a few styrene bits from the completion of final assembly, which took place just a few minutes before I shot these images....  DSC 0376

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I wanted to use the triangular "Lynx" air cleaner, but didn't want to open a sealed kit to get it.  The equally period correct "bug's eye" air cleaner came from the AMT-Ertl 1970.5 Baldwin Motion Camaro kit.  (The "Ford Motorsport" logo on the valve covers is about ten years in the future from my target time period (it should have read "Motorcraft"), but with the somewhat unique shape of the Cleveland valve covers and only two choices in scale, this was a necessary compromise).  

DSC 0378

No real surprises underneath.  But that Cleveland mill fit like a glove!  (The oil pan did have to be reversed, and massaged accordingly in appearance, to move the sump to the rear for added road clearance).  The underbody floor and lower firewall area was swapped in from the Revell 1929 Model A Roadster kit.   

DSC 0379

Here the Revell 1929 Model A Roadster Pickup up top was test fitted (I added the top bows after this image was shot).  

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The project was inspired by a 1/1 scale Ford 1929 Model A Roadster Pickup pictured in the Hot Rod/Petersen Publishing "1974 Annual Street Rod Pictorial" and in the Challenge Publications (i.e. Rod Action) one-off "Ford Street Rods" in 1975.  Here's a photo with the model in partially completed status with a copy of the real car's image in the background.  

DSC 0358

Yes, extensive under construction photos were taken along with appropriate documentation, and the intent is to eventually do an article on the assembly process.  But at this point I do not have a publication format or timing lined up.  It may be a while (possibly, quite a while) before that happens.  

Thanks for your interest and for taking a look; happy to answer any questions or comments you may have.  Best....TIM 

Edited by tim boyd
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This turned out killer! Great color choices. Love the wheel and tire combo and "Street Is Neat" decal. I also especially like the really dark "stained" bed floor and how it looks with the black bed frame and chrome strips.

Couple of observations. It looks like you molded in part of the modern Revell '29 Roadster firewall? The floor carpet looks like it's some kind of fabric? Are the headers modified Phantom Vicky?

 

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Posted (edited)
On 3/27/2021 at 11:55 PM, Dennis Lacy said:

This turned out killer! Great color choices. Love the wheel and tire combo and "Street Is Neat" decal. I also especially like the really dark "stained" bed floor and how it looks with the black bed frame and chrome strips.

Couple of observations. It looks like you molded in part of the modern Revell '29 Roadster firewall? The floor carpet looks like it's some kind of fabric? Are the headers modified Phantom Vicky?

 

Thanks Dennis!  The bed floor was not what was intended....the decal I used was very transparent and when applied over the black base, it came out much darker than I had planned.  But I decided I liked the unintended result - good to know you do too.   As for the black stakes again I had planned a much lighter, wood grained surface but I discovered that AMT's graining on the bed stakes was so faint that it would have disappeared under several coats of "wood grained" paint.  As it was, by rubbing the flat black primer with a toothpick I was able to "raise the grain" just enough to look like wood stakes that had been painted black somewhere along the way.  In the end, the whole bed finish gives a different vibe than what I had planned, but sometimes its OK to just "go with the flow" and I'm happy with how it turned out.

I did indeed use the lower firewall area from the Revell '29 Roadster kit (intro above has been updated to reflect this).  The floor carpet is a stretchy fabric dating back some 40 years....wanted to try something different than my usual flocking (or sometimes, embossing powder).   Would probably have done the flocking instead if I had to do it over again.   

The headers are the Replicas and Miniatures pieces intended for the Revell 1932 Ford Five Window Coupe Early Hemi mill. The exhaust port spacing, of course, matched the Cleveland V8.  I presume Norm patterned those off the Phantom Vicky parts, with the full exhaust bypass diverters removed.  I used these instead of the kit pieces to leave off the remainder of the exhaust system as I've already done the full exhaust boogie on many of my other builds, and I like the idea of an "outlaw" Cleveland V8 pounding away through open headers.   Norm's kit also comes with turn down tips but I left them off, as again, period wise I don't recall those being used by builders at that time.  They were finished with Alclad Chrome over Testors Gloss Black enamel.  

One other mod - the model uses the '32 Ford grille shell and radiator from Revell's 1930 Model A Coupe.  But I had to grind off the engraved electric fan - again, something that did not exist on rods back in the day - and insert a piece of brass screen painted black.  Sounds simple but probably consumed a couple hours of modifying, painting, and fiddling.   Then had to find a five-bladed, equally spaced fan to add to the engine (the aftermarket kit's fan did not match my 351C references).   Stuff most people will never notice, but important to me that it be "right". 

Thx again for the comments and questions....TIM  

 

Edited by tim boyd
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This is such a "complete" model.  By that, I mean everything looks just right - wheel choice, stance, positioning of the Clevo in the engine bay, not too high, not too low, the proportion of the stakebed to the body and even the choice of Deuce grille over a Model A grille.  The black stakebed is, indeed, a happy accident - it suits the colour of the body perfectly whereas a brown bed might have looked a bit much Beverley Hillbillies. 

Can you imagine how much harder this build would have been without the Revell Model A kits?  I ended up with six roadsters and two coupes but already I am feeling like that is not enough! That platform opens the door for soooooo many fine hot rod models.

Cheers

Alan

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On 3/28/2021 at 9:20 PM, Vettegasser said:

I’m 58 yes old been watching your stuff for long as I can remember you never stop amazing me awesome work very realistic 

Thanks Jimmy.....I'm blushing (not really, but you know what I mean.)  That's a wonderful compliment and very much appreciated....TIM 

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On 3/29/2021 at 6:15 PM, alan barton said:

This is such a "complete" model.  By that, I mean everything looks just right - wheel choice, stance, positioning of the Clevo in the engine bay, not too high, not too low, the proportion of the stakebed to the body and even the choice of Deuce grille over a Model A grille.  The black stakebed is, indeed, a happy accident - it suits the colour of the body perfectly whereas a brown bed might have looked a bit much Beverley Hillbillies. 

Can you imagine how much harder this build would have been without the Revell Model A kits?  I ended up with six roadsters and two coupes but already I am feeling like that is not enough! That platform opens the door for soooooo many fine hot rod models.

Cheers

Alan

Thanks Alan.....yes....sometimes I think I drive myself crazy with trying to get a model "just right"....and wondering if anybody really cares or notices.  Fortunately, many who read this forum actually do care, kt seems.  Makes it worth all the extra effort after all.  

As for your comment on the Revell newish Model A kits....you are SO correct.  Other than all the fly-specking details, the basic conversion is realytive easy and made so much more easy by basing so much on the Revell Model A kit gubbins....

Best....TIM 

 

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On 3/28/2021 at 8:11 AM, Rocking Rodney Rat said:

Very nice! -RRR

Thanks Rodney....and mega congrats on your apparent upcoming Model Cars mag cover story....can't wait to check that one out!   Cheers....TIM 

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49 minutes ago, tim boyd said:

Thanks Rodney....and mega congrats on your apparent upcoming Model Cars mag cover story....can't wait to check that one out!   Cheers....TIM 

That's our friend Kit Karson that is getting the ink (no, not a tattoo)..... -RRR

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Posted (edited)
On 4/1/2021 at 5:50 PM, Rocking Rodney Rat said:

That's our friend Kit Karson that is getting the ink (no, not a tattoo)..... -RRR

Sorry 'bout that Rodney...both you guys build killer hot rod models, and I guess I got you both confused (in my apparent old age)/  Best...TIM 

'

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On 4/3/2021 at 10:49 AM, Gerald Haney said:

love it!  very clean.  Street is Neat definitely reminds me of the 70's

 

great work!

Thank you Gerald...TIM

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On 4/2/2021 at 9:23 PM, tim boyd said:

Sorry 'bout that Rodney...both you guys build killer hot rod models, and I guess I got you both confused (in my apparent old age)/  Best...TIM 

'

@tim boyd & @Rocking Rodney Rat

OK boys... what we have here is a mutual admiration club!  RRR & I have been building under the K&R Kustoms+Rods logo for decades!

264598952_KRKustomsRodsLogo.jpg.c8ecb746852147bbf5eab5e98071f06d.jpg

The "K" is not only for "KUSTOMS" it is also for Kit Karson and the "R" is not only for "RODS" it is for "Rockin' Rodney Rat".  We have carried our logo over the years on several forums & social platforms on the inter-web.  Even here on MCM Forum, we have been questioned regarding our individual identity, asking if we were really two different model builders.  Or, not!  We have even collaborated on several builds over the three plus decades we've know each other and for those that we have shared in the construction, we call it a K&R Kustoms+Rods build.  Otherwise, RRR's builds are his and my builds are KK's!  RRR has noted elsewhere here on MCM Forum comments regarding the differences between our building styles... but, I will not elaborate on that here!

Thank you, @tim boyd for the compliment!  As I have mentioned before, you have had a major influence on model car builders around the world and a personal mentor of mine well before you even knew who I was.  Both RRR & I have strived to carry on your legacy by sharing our experiences with model car builders at large, as you have so modestly done for so many years.

As for your '70s Tribute Stake Side RPU, it is killer!  It has always been my personal creed to build as if it were going to be street legal and drivable.  Often times some model cars/trucks have aspects that are "KOOL", but would not be realistic if applied to a 1:1 build.  Over the 200+ columns that you have authored, never once have you created a model that wasn't street-able!  (Sure, Racing Slicks aren't street legal in some places... but, that's the true essence of Hot Rodding worldwide!)  Having hosted many model car shows, Drag vs Street classifications most always have been determined by the rear tires.  Models with slicks fell into the Straight Line Racing class & all others ended up in the Hot Rod/Street Machine classes.  Your RPU is a crossover Street Rod ready to race (except in the rain) and a real hit at the Rod Runs/Hot Rod Shows! -KK

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Couple of fresh pictures with a load of - what could be more appropriate for a 1970's tribute - Beer Kegs.   These are from the Monogram Beer Wagon kit.  The bed rail across the back is a press fit so I can leave in it place, or remove it, depending on the scene. 

DSC 0418

 DSC 0415

Thanks for looking....TIM 

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On 4/9/2021 at 8:03 AM, Kit Karson said:

 

 

The "K" is not only for "KUSTOMS" it is also for Kit Karson and the "R" is not only for "RODS" it is for "Rockin' Rodney Rat".  We have carried our logo over the years on several forums & social platforms on the inter-web.  Even here on MCM Forum, we have been questioned regarding our individual identity, asking if we were really two different model builders.  Or, not!  We have even collaborated on several builds over the three plus decades we've know each other and for those that we have shared in the construction, we call it a K&R Kustoms+Rods build.  Otherwise, RRR's builds are his and my builds are KK's!  RRR has noted elsewhere here on MCM Forum comments regarding the differences between our building styles... but, I will not elaborate on that here!

Thank you, @tim boyd for the compliment!  As I have mentioned before, you have had a major influence on model car builders around the world and a personal mentor of mine well before you even knew who I was.  Both RRR & I have strived to carry on your legacy by sharing our experiences with model car builders at large, as you have so modestly done for so many years.

 

Kit....thanks for the additional background on the KR logo and your building alliance with Rodney.  What a cool, cool legacy you guys are leaving for the hobby....

And it is more gratifying than one could possibly imagine to hear that I have contributed that kind of influence to the world of model car hobbyists.  Kudos to you and Rodney for building on that yourselves....

All the very best....TIM 

 

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@tim boyd - @Rocking Rodney Rat

Tim,

As always, you are most courteous and considerate in your response!  I would imagine there are more model builders that share our appreciation for your tutelage and reaffirmation for the continuing growth and support of the hobby, in your over 200+ columns in the now long-gone Street Rodder magazine. 

It is awesome that we have the MCM Forum to share our mutual affection for the art of model building.  We are so fortunate to have the years of experiences accumulated amongst our followers and ourselves, that sharing this has become a major mainstay here and around the world.  Our hobby has had it's ups and downs over the last 6 or 7 decades, but remains today a wonderful expression of personal joy and camaraderie.

Thank you, always an admirer, -KK

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Hi Tim.

Once again a super clean in scale build of a very interesting subject.  I never expect anything less from your table an you always deliver!

Ron B.

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