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currently building on the dinig table in the livingroom .....

all my stuff is in a cubbord in the livingroom

usually i build in my shed / workshop but thats too cold and to humigd in the winter .. i hope to build a space upstairs in the future , still redoing the whole upper floor and rearanging the rooms / walls and ceilings so that may take a while

but one thing is for sure a ficed workearea is great but its not a must , you can build anywhere

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my workbench is actually a custom microwave piece i made for my wife when we lived in NY...she remodeled that kitchen yrs after i built it...i was gonna trash it but i thought it would make a grt8 work bench and it did...moved it to FLA when i retired in '06....its set up in the back of my golf cart garage...perfect fit...

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this is my outside work bench that i built...i do all my painting and on nice days some building out there

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...but one thing is for sure a fixed work area is great but its not a must, you can build anywhere...

I agree Richard, all of my best builds in the past were done at the corner of the love seat and coffee table, I only got my current setup about a year and a half ago. The model in my avatar was built on the coffee table, along with many more that have hauled in 1st place at contests, it's not about where you build, but how much attention you give to each one!

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3'x8'...or so. I found a guy selling commercial exterior doors on Craigslist. They're something like 1.5" thick and the door handle hole has cords passing through it. Oh yeah, an electric pencil sharpener cord, too. I got a couple of those when my National Guard company got rid of them. Great for reference marks while cutting and kitbashing. The supports are a pair of 2-drawer file cabinets. One has hanging files in it to organize my Evergreen plastic sheet and strips. A file for each step up in size (.010", 015", .020", etc, then other shapes like half-round, tube, triangular, etc.) The work surface is a glass door from an old stereo cabinet. I don't know if those things are still made, but whenever I see one put out with the trash, I take it. I have 3 or 4 extras, and I've never broken one. Cleanup is a breeze; just use a razor to scrape off glue or paint. The flat surface is also great for getting things aligned, like making sure all 4 wheels are on the ground. No pictures...it looks like a bomb went off in there. :huh:

Oh yeah, I have a second one in the garage for the Sherline lathe and mill.

Edited by LDO
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Here's my work table today while I stay warm by the fire. DSC04328_zps93724cc9.jpgNext it spreads to this.DSC04329_zps4966d733.jpgThen this in the kitchen.DSC04330_zpsfc4c9bde.jpgThen this back in the garage to paint.DSC04331_zps3cfe5bf4.jpgAnd this my original work table in the garage a mess as usual. DSC04332_zps7bf6e61e.jpgAnd this by 1:00 pm blocking the garage door so she can't get in.DSC04333_zpsf609d501.jpgAnd now to get the whole mess cleaned up before the Wife gets home or I could end up in the dog house. Maybe not such a good plan after all.

Edited by rmvw guy
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I have an L shaped workbench that was built to fit into the space I had. The long leg is 18"x60" and the short leg is 24"x45". The short leg is where I do most of the work and is covered with a glass top while the long leg holds paint racks, tools etc.

It is my believe though, that no workbench can be too big and any workbench will soon fill up projects and stuff. Even if I start with a completely clean bench I'm usually down to a clear space about 18x12 within a couple of days of work.

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The work surface is a glass door from an old stereo cabinet. I don't know if those things are still made, but whenever I see one put out with the trash, I take it. I have 3 or 4 extras, and I've never broken one. Cleanup is a breeze; just use a razor to scrape off glue or paint. The flat surface is also great for getting things aligned, like making sure all 4 wheels are on the ground. No pictures...it looks like a bomb went off in there. :huh:

Funny thing, my work surface is the clear glass lens from a Xerox machine. It's thick glass and will never break. This is the part where you put the page you wish to copy. When I was cleaning out my father's garage to sell the house, I found it, NOS in it's original package. I asked him how the heck it got there. He said back when he was working the Xerox tech came to fix their machine and left it there. So being the packrat he was, he took it. He figured it would be useful one day. Not within his lifetime but I know he'd smile!

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mine is an L shape - 8' long over all. 4' wide on one end and 2' wide on the smaller end ,, the wide end is 4' by 2' so that makes the thin end 6' by 2'

basically I needed a 6' by 2' piece of plywood so I just took the rest and made an L shaped work bench out of it . all sitting approx 4' up on a wooden frame

ACTUAL work area is approx 18" by 18" , ,,,,,,,,time for a cleanup and re-organize.

Prior to and shortly after my wife and I were 1st married, I worked at the kitchen table or a small desk in the bedroom. wasn't long after that I moved to a slightly bigger desk in the spare bedroom, then same bench in a corner of the downstairs family room of our first house . NOW, I have the big bench in a bigger house . Funny things is I always seem to end up with about the same size work area

Edited by gtx6970
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I like to build at my kitchen counter. Even though I have a full basement and plenty of space for a workshop, I like to build upstairs where everyone is. Someday when the kids are gone I'll make a workshop where I can disappear :)

The only bummer is that I have to put everything away when I am done. One day when the kids aren't using the basement I'll make a nice modle workshop down there.

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and this is where I store the stuff. This holds the current kit I am working on and some of my building supplies,

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Edited by Jeff Johnston
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I like to build at my kitshen counter. Even though I have a full basement and plenty of space for a workshop, I like to build upstairs where everyone is.

Jeff, I have always built in an upstairs spare bedroom that becomes 'the model room'. Back when I was in NJ, I didn't have a basement so it basically was the only space available. Here in PA, my house has a full finished basement but I still took over a bedroom upstairs. My wife figured she could too, so she has the room next to me as her photo and craft room. My daughters are grown and live back in NJ so we have the space here.

Even though the basement is finished, I feel disconnected when I'm down there by myself.

Edited by Tom Geiger
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Jeff, Tom, I thought I was the only builder who didn't want to sequester himself, I know many guys who have a room away from everyone. My armoire is in the living room, right in the middle of the kids and my wife, I want to be around them when I'm building. When I'm alone, it just feels wrong!

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Manny, How do you keep your paints from freezing and more important how do you stay warm in the winter months in an outdoor shed? I like the set up, just wondering if this is just a seasonable work area or do you try to keep climate control some how?

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Jeff, I have always built in an upstairs spare bedroom that becomes 'the model room'. Back when I was in NJ, I didn't have a basement so it basically was the only space available. Here in PA, my house has a full finished basement but I still took over a bedroom upstairs. My wife figured she could too, so she has the room next to me as her photo and craft room. My daughters are grown and live back in NJ so we have the space here.

Even though the basement is finished, I feel disconnected when I'm down there by myself.

I used to build at my dining room table, being upstairs with the family, but it was a real hassle having to put everything away for meals or when we were having company over. Last year I decided to bite the bullet and reclaim my third of the unfinished basement from my younger daughter who lives with us and has all her furniture and stuff down there. It is on the chilly side during the winter,but I have a dedicated work space. It is GREAT not having to pack everything away all the time. A small heater warms the area and I don't actually mind being alone while i'm building. I find that I'm more productive without the interruptions and distractions of the TV and conversations, etc.

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Manny, How do you keep your paints from freezing and more important how do you stay warm in the winter months in an outdoor shed? I like the set up, just wondering if this is just a seasonable work area or do you try to keep climate control some how?

you got it right. it is darn cold in the winter. i have a propane heater that i use to get the shed warm fast then i turn that off and use a small space heater by my feet. i have a blanket covering the door and i always wear a scarf around my neck when real cold and i always wear a jewelers catch apron so i won't lose any small parts and that apron also holds the heat and keeps me nice and toasty. :)

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DSC00238-vi.jpg

Responding to Rich's post about working in the dining room... this is a photo of my old model room in NJ, but focus on the yellow and pink board in the center of the bench. This is my lucky modeling board. Back when I didn't have a space I actually built the Pyrite's Paddler '53 Ford on my avatar on this board on my kitchen table. This was back when my kids were small so I had to be careful and keep everything out of their reach. Each evening after dinner, I would clamp my light to the edge of the kitchen table, set my board in place and start working. At the end of each session, I'd tidy up and put the board, with the project still on it, on top of the refrigerator. I learned to work it out. As a positive, it taught me to work a bit more tidy and plan out my work better.

So those of you who don't have a dedicated space, it's no excuse not to build. I built my favorite model on the kitchen table!

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