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DRIPTROIT 71

White Giesel Engine

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Back around the late 60's, the White Truck Company converted a Cumminns 185hp Diesel v-8 to a gas engine and called it the Giesel. These were offered in the 9000 series. I am wanting to find some good pictures of one of these engines for a future project. I would also like to know how close in physical size they were to the 903. The dimensions of the Giesel are probably the same as the 555, but I'm not sure how they compare to the 903. Any help or info would be appreciated.

Thanks, Brian

 

 

Edited by DRIPTROIT 71

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I know nothing about it, but the concept of using a diesel to start with, then use LP/propane, it would literally last forever. Tractor pullers convert diesel to spark ignition alcohol burners for the same reasons-- high boost pressure longevity!

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The 555, or "triple nickel" as the mechanics who worked on them called them were 555ci V8's, and were just a small bit bigger then a big block chevy.  I only saw one that wasn't naturally aspirated, All of them I saw were in marine applications, never myself saw one in a automotive application. Probably would have fit well under the small hood of the old whites. Very well could have been a 555 at 185hp. It is roughly the same size as a Cat 3208. The 903 filled up the frame rails of a truck of that era, and the lowest HP 903 I have ever heard about was a 325hp. When I worked at a Cummins distributor, I did work on several Natural Gas powered 1710v-12 engines in hospital generators. Which were converted diesel engines, not much to it, they did use different pistons, and cams,  but most of the rest of the base engine was the same. I really cant tell by the picture of the engine, as I never saw a 555 without wet exhaust manifolds, as I said , never saw an automotive 555. My question would be, Why...... Diesel engines are used to this day because a gas would get gallons to the mile, not miles to the gallon, with the type of loads being pulled, even back then.  By the way, us techs who had the "pleasure" to work on a 903 called them the "9-0-nuthin'. I was not very fond of them.  

Edited by dad vader

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I know nothing about it, but the concept of using a diesel to start with, then use LP/propane, it would literally last forever. Tractor pullers convert diesel to spark ignition alcohol burners for the same reasons-- high boost pressure longevity!

The 555, or "triple nickel" as the mechanics who worked on them called them were 555ci V8's, and were just a small bit bigger then a big block chevy.  I only saw one that wasn't naturally aspirated, All of them I saw were in marine applications, never myself saw one in a automotive application. Probably would have fit well under the small hood of the old whites. Very well could have been a 555 at 185hp. It is roughly the same size as a Cat 3208. The 903 filled up the frame rails of a truck of that era, and the lowest HP 903 I have ever heard about was a 325hp. When I worked at a Cummins distributor, I did work on several Natural Gas powered 1710v-12 engines in hospital generators. Which were converted diesel engines, not much to it, they did use different pistons, and cams,  but most of the rest of the base engine was the same. I really cant tell by the picture of the engine, as I never saw a 555 without wet exhaust manifolds, as I said , never saw an automotive 555. My question would be, Why...... Diesel engines are used to this day because a gas would get gallons to the mile, not miles to the gallon, with the type of loads being pulled, even back then.  By the way, us techs who had the "pleasure" to work on a 903 called them the "9-0-nuthin'. I was not very fond of them.  

Thanks for the responses.

From what I understand the Giesel was a big flop. I just wanted to replicate one in a White 9000 project for something different. From what I've read the Giesel should have the same dimensions as the 555. So, the 555 is about the same size as the 3208, right?

I would really like to find some photos of the fuel and ignition set up on these engines.

Thanks again!!

Brian

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Yes, the 555, and the 3208 are roughly the same size. Cant really find any decent pics of the fuel system on Google , I will see if I still have an old manual in the attic, don't think so, but I will check. By looking on Google I have found this engine was very popular in agricultural equipment.

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The only reason I would think of going the gas route would be because of the availability of diesel in your area. Back in the day it was not found at most stations around here like it is now. 

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