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Noob questions for Painting


FreddyB.
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[Hey guys,

I'm new to the hobby and have purchased an AMT 1970 1/2 camaro z28. I've sanded the body and washed it with dish soap, and have let it air dry. I just have a few questions about the rest of the process. I bought Testors plain gray primer, how many coats of primer do i administer? Next, I bought a light blue enamal for the base color, I forgot to add that both of these paints are in the spray can form. Finally, what do I do for a final coat? I've read that people add a gloss finish. Do I have to buy an enamal base gloss? Since I used enamal for the primer and base coat? MY LHS only has that Model Master Gloss Lacquer overcoat, but I doubt that will work since its a lacquer, right?

Sorry, one more question. Is it a good idea to wash all the parts in dish soap b4 i start to paint the engine and things like that? I'm just curious on everyone's process of building.

Thanks guys, I really enjoy reading the forums and looking at all the fine craftsmanship

Freddy B.

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OK, I'll throw my 2¢ in.............I'm not a big fan of Testor's enamels because as a durable paint, they don't hold up as well as your genuine automotive brands will.

Having said that, you'll want to put on at least several thin coats of primer but not so much that details get buried. After the primer has dried sufficiently----------(a while for Testor's!), lightly sand the primer with some 600 grit sandpaper to get rid of any dusties, and to give your color coat something to "bite" into. Since you're spraying out of a can, a rule of thumb is to NEVER spray directly on the model when starting. Start to spray away from the model, pass over it, and then stop once your past the body. This will minimize any "surprises" the can might give you, (another reason I don't like can spraying) and you'll have a bit better coverage. You might make as many as five or six passes before the color is all even..............If I were you, I would be practicing on a junk body to get the hang of it before painting on a pet project.

If your color coat is a solid color (non metallic) I generally don't recommend clearcoating as the paint can be rubbed out and polished to a great shine. However, some on the board will disagree, and say to go ahead and clearcoat. :D I would once again use light coats, as you don't want the model to appear to have been dipped in shellac. If it were a metallic, by all means clearcoat as rubbing out metallic paint will lead to a mottled, swirly appearance on the surface.

After you're done. you might need to once again rub out the clearcoat and polish to give you a nice appearance.

As far as washing the other parts, I generally don't do that---------I might wipe them down with some alcohol to get rid of any mold release..........but I haven't done it all the time and I've never run into a problem with paint adhesion.

Hope all this helps.........everyone has a different technique for painting---------as they say "Your mileage will vary". B)

Edited by MrObsessive
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i usually just use flat white or gray spray paint and put on acouple coats on and wetsand it and the color coats i build up the color by light coats then one nice smooth coat. but i usually clear the model with rustoleum clear. but you dont always have to clear its basiclly your choice. i find it easier to polish out and less to worry about polishing though the paint but it takes practice and for washing parts off i only wash the body off and thats like you did after im done sanding but i never wash the engine parts or even the interior and i never had any problems. but that how i do it and everyone is different so youll eventlly find out what best works for you so good luck.

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Guest Markus355

my .02 as well.

Enamels SUCK. drying time's are atrocious. Lacquer FTW.

that said, they do offer some very nice shine.

i clear everything, and i prefer the mile deep, dipped in clear look as i mostly build kustoms. and the testors clear gloss is about as good as they come. its the ONLY clear i use.

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these fenders were painted with the duplicolour paint shop series line of kandies. (duplicolour high build primer in a spray can, DC Candy base coat, multiple coats of DC Candy red) then testors clear lacquer.

i will say, the testors clear laquer is a very mild lacquer. if it can even be called a lacquer.

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As a general rule, I use lacquer primer for everything.

I like Plasti-Kote and Dupli-Color, but prefer Plasti-Kote. It seems to cover more evenly and is a little milder formula, reducing the risk of problems.

Get white and gray. You'll need them both. White for white cars and reds, which tend to get a little mottled with gray primer. I use gray for just about everything else. Some people like red oxide primer for under red. I tried it and wasn't too wild about it.

As far as clear-coats go, I've been told that GlossCote can yellow over time. Supposedly at hobby and craft stores (and possibly directly,) Krylon offers an all-acrylic clear gloss that won't yellow. If you use automotive paints, you can use the automotive clear.

Testors One-Coat lacquer clear is also supposed to be very nice, although I haven't tried it. The One-Coat is said to be mild enough that it can be applied to bare plastic, so it might be okay over enamels. Try it on scrap plastic first to be sure, and wait a few days before concluding any thoughts on it.

Charlie Larkin

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Guest Markus355

One coat is AWESOME paint. its practically all i use for colours and its the ONLY clear ill use. it can go on bare plastic. though it doesnt stick well. primer helps it cover a little more evenly.

i will say this, the testors one coat line, the paint is fantastic and a joy to work with. but the nozzles on the cans suck (IMO) i find they spray on too heavily. i decant and spray these paints with my air brush with great results.

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Ok for your primer question do three light coats and wetsand using a 1200 grit to take away small imperfectionsBUT becarful on the edges. Then do atleast three coats of your base the first two very light and the last on a wet coat Then wet sand that as before be carful on the edges. Then two coats of clear wet sand and buff and your good to go.

As for washing your parts if it works for you then do it. I personally use a tack rag for my builds especially if thers alot of body work done to them.

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