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this is very satisfying


Quick GMC
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I wish I had more time on the engine lathes at school.

I had Tech 1 last year, which was basic electronics and blacksmithing. That was half a year.

Then I had Tech 2 which was welding.

Now this year I have Advanced Tech. Advanced Tech is for, obviously, advanced students, ones who did well enough in the other classes to get bumped up. It runs the full year. However, because I didn't do gym last year (a full year class, mind you) they're making me cut Tech off half a year early so I can do half of the credit this year.

Seriously?

I don't believe I'll be running for a living, so what's the sense in that?

Now I'm going to have to go through a big event with getting the courses changed so I can have a full year of Tech now (no problem, there are six people in it currently).

Public school system, I tell ya.

Edited by chunkypeanutbutter
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????????

Scott

It's a CNC lathe cutting a curved cone shape. Several programmed roughing cuts, and then the final finish cut done in one smooth arc. A human operator couldn't do it that nicely (quickly) in 100 years.

PS: That video clip IS speeded up considerably, just so's ya know... B)

Edited by Ace-Garageguy
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Miles, based on what I've been hearing about the public schools, you're probably lucky you have any real hard-tech courses at all. I'm amazed that a public school even HAS a lathe, much less someone capable of instructing on it.

What you describe sounds like a perfect pre-engineering course. Early hands-on experience in a variety of disciplines makes for much better all-around problem solvers.

What is your ultimate goal? Engineering and design, I assume?

Edited by Ace-Garageguy
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It's a CNC lathe cutting a curved cone shape. Several programmed roughing cuts, and then the final finish cut done in one smooth arc. A human operator couldn't do it that nicely (quickly) in 100 years.

PS: That video clip IS speeded up considerably, just so's ya know... B)

I don't know about the link I posted, but this one is not sped up

Here is the from calibration

Edited by Quick GMC
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Miles, if you're not happy with public schools, you can always go to a private school or just quit altogether. I attended public grade and high school and had no problems worth mentioning. And of course my parents didn't have the money to send me anywhere else. If you can't change the situation, make the best of what you have.

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I sure miss doing that stuff. I operated and programed CNC lathes for about 10 years. It was really cool seeing a part go from a solid 12 foot length of bar stock to an almost finished piece. The parts we made were very similar to the 1st video. We made all the internal components for Honeywell/Garret, who HAD the contract for Ford and their Powerstroke up till Ford redesigned to the twin turbo. The sad part of it, it didnt pay very well. I enjoyed it very much but couldnt take care of things. So i started driving, so i didnt loose the enjoyment of creating something from nothing. I enjoy welding, metal fabrication, machining and building things. Thats my hobby. I enjoy my job driving and dont look it at it like im working the entire time. I just have a long commute to a very simple, well paid job. Thats how i keep the enjoyment in my job. Iam looking to get a small manual lathe for my garage and eventually a small mill. That video brought back some good memories. Thanks for posting it, reminded of just how satisfying it really was, ( as long as i dont think about the paycheck).

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Miles, based on what I've been hearing about the public schools, you're probably lucky you have any real hard-tech courses at all. I'm amazed that a public school even HAS a lathe, much less someone capable of instructing on it.

What you describe sounds like a perfect pre-engineering course. Early hands-on experience in a variety of disciplines makes for much better all-around problem solvers.

What is your ultimate goal? Engineering and design, I assume?

My daughters' high school has a pre-engineering program that runs all 4 years. They have 3D modeling, machine shop, 3D printers - WAYYYY beyond anything I could have imagined when I went through the same school 24 years ago.

I argue every time somebody tells me that public education is a mess - my girls have learned way more and are considerably more prepared than I ever was, or am...in addition to the engineering program, they have a 4 year biomed program. I wish I could have had that level of education available to me for free when I was in high school - I had a t square, pencils, and one computer in my drafting and architecture classes.

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I lucked out and was the first, and unfortunately one of the last classes in my high school to have a machining/welding class. I did pretty well in machining and really enjoyed it... sucks I missed about a month of it for getting in-school suspension LOL

I could set the lathe up pretty quickly and find my center w/ the tool I was using, and cut a piece to rough shape then go to to the final piece I wanted pretty quickly w/o much measuring. I just always knew what I wanted it to look when done. Even if it was two pieces that needed to fit together. Not sure if I was just that good, or ignorant. haha...

Then, since that class was only a half year, I spent the rest of the year in the welding side of things. Loved that. Hated stick welding though. This was also before auto-darkening hoods were big, or possibly even available. I'd probably be just ok at it now with an auto darkening hood. I took to MIG welding like a fish in water. That's been my strong point. I'm no professional but I'd think I would do well in a test. I'd like to get my welding cert. Just in case. I've done soo many repairs/modifications/customizing to cars/trucks/lawn mowers, and even making halloween props all because I learned how to weld.

Welding has become one of the most commonly used things in my life lately as far as projects go. Yay rust belt.

But it does suck that schools are slowly phasing that stuff out now. Nothing like a bunch of socially awkward, skill-less young adults... oh.. wait... :)

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Right. It's a different skill, but I learned oxy-acetylene first, and Tig came easy after that. A monkey should be able to run a decent Mig bead (but apparently not, from what I see every day).

I almost forgot about the old art of Torch welding with an oxy-acetylene... Did that too in shop. That was cool.

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Miles, if you're not happy with public schools, you can always go to a private school or just quit altogether. ........... If you can't change the situation, make the best of what you have.

Are you f'n kidding me?

This is your advice to the kid? Quit school? How will that promote his future? Where's he going to land a job with no basic education? If he does get extremely lucky and he's very talented even if he scores a job, how will he advance in the workforce? Get a raise? Better benefits?

Your last sentence says it all, make the best of what you have.

G

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