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An odd configuration


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#1 kataranga

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 12:02 PM

I've randomly sighted trucks of this configuration driving around but this time around I finally managed to snap a picture of one to hopefully understand why trucks like this even exist...

Posted Image

The truck was a regular Freightliner Cascadia, standard bunk, single rear axle. The trailer is a drop-deck curtainside. Company is these guys: Truck Accessories Group.

#2 Jim B

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 12:09 PM

I don't know that this company hauls, but Stickley Furnature out of Manlius, NY, runs Freightliners like that all the time.

#3 Aaronw

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 12:31 PM

What is confusing about it? The tractor is set up for short haul, modest weight loads.

I'm not really familiar with curtainside trailers, but assume they are basically flatbeds with some protection from the weather / debris for the load.

#4 kataranga

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 04:31 PM

Define "short haul". To me short haul would be a day cab...

#5 Aaronw

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 04:48 PM

It would be a daycab, sorry I misread your post and didn't pickout the sleeper in the photo.

Still not clear on the why does it exist part other than the single rear axle?

If that is it, then if the company doesn't need to haul a heavy load it saves money upfront on the truck, saves money on maintenance and tires are expensive. One axle is 4 less tires, maybe a little better fuel economy too.

#6 highway

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 04:48 PM

What is confusing about it? The tractor is set up for short haul, modest weight loads.

I'm not really familiar with curtainside trailers, but assume they are basically flatbeds with some protection from the weather / debris for the load.


After looking at the link posted, the company deals in mostly fiberglass truck caps, so those trucks don't haul much weight at all, and shows no need for a tandem axle truck.

Curtainsides can vary, but they are mostly a cross between a flatbed with a roof and a van trailer without sidewalls.

Define "short haul". To me short haul would be a day cab...


As a driver, most companies consider usually anything under 300 to 500 miles a short haul. They are just long enough to make a sleeper necessary for the return trip.

#7 CDA

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 08:21 PM

Weight too. The less tare weight you have, the more you can haul. Also, toll stations, most I've seen, charge by axle. In Europe, if you see a tandem alxe tractor, its usually for heavy haul, or speciall cargo. Alot of trailers there are curtain side too. Not sure if they are any lighter, but mostly its all about saving money.

#8 67hrholden

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 09:44 PM

Curtain sidedtrailers are easier and quicker to load as you can open them up all the way and just load pallet after pallet. If the sides are solid you can only load from the rear and use a pallet lifter.

#9 kingiguana

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 04:20 AM

I see those all the time. I work installing fiberglass truck caps. and that is exactly what that truck is hauling. Some have the curtains, some do not. But it makes loading and unloading easier.

#10 kataranga

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 05:08 AM

My guess about these trucks was that they are for hauling high volume, low weight loads, which would fit the description of large fibreglass cabs and tonneau covers for pickups and what not.

#11 txdieseldog

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 06:31 AM

Chris, with that name, I am guessing it to be fiberglass truck bed shells. I have seen one similar delivering here in TX. Light load but bulky. They fork them in sideways and close the curtain so the wind won't catch them.

#12 txdieseldog

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 06:32 AM

Chris, I didn't even bother to read your last post. My apologies. That should be what they are though.

#13 Chad

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 03:39 AM

They do haul truck caps and tonneau covers for pickup trucks. Its pretty much a giant rack inside that trailer for spots for the caps to sit on.

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#14 scale trucker

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 11:55 AM

short haul here to florida