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Peerless logging trailer question


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Ok, thank you Håkan!!! I ask as I'm building one from Evergreen and brass and have the draw bar so it extends... Working on building the rear bunk right now along with the front truck mounted bunk... I have to post pics on it yet.....

All the real ones I've seen pics on they are all in the back position  which got me thinking that maybe they don't extend out!! LOL

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Kerry,

The Draw Bar doesn't extend, it's the rear bunk and suspension thats adjustable. The bunk/suspension slides along the bar then it's locked in place where it's needed.

Kind of what I was thinking from looking at the pics of trailers online. I have the rear suspension/bunk to where it moves but will fix the drawbar then. I have it to where it moves out now so..... Thank you Anthony!!!!

 

I'll get some pics of what I'm doing posted up tomorrow or tomorrow night!!!!!

Edited by DrKerry
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If you meant if the bar was telescopic I missunderstood because it isn't, as Anthony said the bar is fixed and the rest of the rig slides on it...so it's adjustable in my eyes.

no problem, I didn't really explain to well either as I read back through what I posted!!!! It's all good!!!!

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Actually, it is telescopic in front. There must by a length compensation when the truck and trailer goes through a corner.

jinker_2_PerfectPhoto.cz_2017-08-04_11-5

jinker_3_PerfectPhoto.cz_2017-08-04_11-5

Looking at the second pic it sure looks like it does. Not sure how far/much it telescopes out though!!??

 

 

 

 

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I don´t know the precise figure either. But these pics taken from US patent web might help.

US2520776-0.thumb.png.965fb247362d0c549e

US2520776-1.thumb.png.eba0a563dee7eb188e

I have made my telescopic end much longer I guess. But it doesn´t matter because the rod extens only as needed in the corner. The aluminium K&S tube is inserted in Evergreen tube onto which I glued the two square inserts to match the inside of the square channel. 

P3141795.thumb.jpg.7608f75a913196eafa20c

P3131780.thumb.jpg.7263f11745c8d70f35b11

P3131778.thumb.jpg.149f2c19d53cd68c84690

P3141811.thumb.jpg.3e2f8e7b29a6cd394a98a

I hope it helps, if not too late.

 

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I don´t know the precise figure either. But these pics taken from US patent web might help.

US2520776-0.thumb.png.965fb247362d0c549e

US2520776-1.thumb.png.eba0a563dee7eb188e

I have made my telescopic end much longer I guess. But it doesn´t matter because the rod extens only as needed in the corner. The aluminium K&S tube is inserted in Evergreen tube onto which I glued the two square inserts to match the inside of the square channel. 

P3141795.thumb.jpg.7608f75a913196eafa20c

P3131780.thumb.jpg.7263f11745c8d70f35b11

P3131778.thumb.jpg.149f2c19d53cd68c84690

P3141811.thumb.jpg.3e2f8e7b29a6cd394a98a

I hope it helps, if not too late.

 

Thank you that makes the photos I've seen online make sense now... it has to be telescopic to eliminate binding when the truck turns... I haven't glued anything on mine so it's not to late!!!! 

Edited by DrKerry
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I'm not sure on the movement while truck turns but would the cylinder stay put while turning? Is it a hydraulic cylinder or just a cylinder that moves during towing?? I'm not sure on it moving or not!!!

 

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I'm not buying into this theory. I'll agree with the reach being telescopic in order to aid with coupling and uncoupling, however I don't agree with the "when the truck turns". How does the reach retract after the truck turns? Keep in mind that both bunks rotate, their not stationery. I would agree if the reach was hydraulic and automatically retracted much in the same manner as an excavator or bucket loader but I don't see that being the case here. If anyone can prove other wise then by all means do so, I'd like to see how it's done

 

I'm not sure on the movement while truck turns but would the cylinder stay put while turning? Is it a hydraulic cylinder or just a cylinder that moves during towing?? I'm not sure on it moving or not!!!

Looking at the last pic above and looking at with the truck turned like it is and when the rig straightens out it has to give a little. If the cylinder was hydraulic and not movable it wouldn't come back into place without binding.... Not sure??

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I don't know exactly how it works either but the reach has to be movable when the truck turns if the load is ancored with chains or wire at both banks as the turning point of the load and the tractor-trailer are at different places, otherwise the load has to be able to slide at one end to make up for the difference in length when the truck turns.
I don't think the movable part of the reach wich I think is called a compensator is hydraulic because you don't pull this type of trailer with the reach when it's loaded, it's just for steering the trailer, you pull the trailer with the log load, and as the load is anchored at both banks and the lengt of the load is fixed the back end of the truck where the hitch is will force the trailer to straighten out and the movable part of the reach to retract when the truck and trailer starting to go straight again after a turn.
Here is a video where you can see it work, look closely when he turns on to the larger paved road:

Edited by Force
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I don't know exactly how it works either but the reach has to be movable when the truck turns if the load is ancored with chains or wire at both banks as the turning point of the load and the tractor-trailer are at different places, otherwise the load has to be able to slide at one end to make up for the difference in length when the truck turns.
I don't think the movable part of the reach wich I think is called a compensator is hydraulic because you don't pull this type of trailer with the reach when it's loaded, it's just for steering the trailer, you pull the trailer with the log load, and as the load is anchored at both banks and the lengt of the load is fixed the back end of the truck where the hitch is will force the trailer to straighten out and the movable part of the reach to retract when the truck and trailer starting to go straight again after a turn.
Here is a video where you can see it work, look closely when he turns on to the larger paved road:

That's what I'm thinking too, it's not a pressurized hydraulic cylinde it's just there as a draw bar to keep the trailer together but is a cylinder that extends and detracts as needed when the truck makes the turn.. like you say it has to have that to keep from the two turning angles of both trailer itself and the load, they both turn per se in there own radius. To me that cylinder is just like a large shock absorber that moves in and out when the truck turns etc.....

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Ok, what I'm seeing is in the pic below. Looking at where the logs are in relation to the bunks that isn't going to move at all. So when the truck makes a turn and lets say it turns sharper than the image shows and the tail of the truck arcs out farther say the truck turns to a 90 degree angle to the trailer, the front of that trailer as shown in the video up top has to give to allow for the truck to turn or it would pull the trailer apart.... The part of the trailer (Number 14) won't give as on a real truck it would be welded solid.... So where (number 17) would be the give point that would go in and out to allow the truck and trailer to make a turn. It may only move in and out about a foot or less but it has to have some give...

US2520776-1.thumb.png.eba0a563dee7eb188e

 

Anthony, I haven't built any kit Peerless trailers yet so I couldn't tell ya on that. I did find this pic and it is pulled out a lot farther than it should be but it gives the idea.... click the link, pic won't load up...

https://www.google.com/search?q=peerless+logging+trailer+model+kit&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiMsvDi1MHVAhUd3YMKHYZ_Dj8Q_AUICygC&biw=1680&bih=941#imgrc=VJr-noaO3-3yZM:

 

 

 

Edited by DrKerry
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Found my answer...... Top of the page shows truck and trailer in both straight and turning positions....

Number 20 shows it in straight position.... Thanks for all the help guys!!!!!!

Related image

Edited by DrKerry
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One thing tho'.
The long section after the center of the bogie where the hitch is mounted on modern logging trucks is to help make the trailer take turns easier as the trailer goes slightly the opposite way through the turn and doesn't cut the corners as much with this setup, and the reach with a compensator is a must as the turning points of the load and hitch are maybe up to 8-10 feet apart.
If the hich is closer to the center of the bogie the trailer will not go through turns as easy and will cut the corners more, and a reach compensator may not be that important as the turning points between the load and the hitch are a lot closer.
So the further the turning points of the load and the hitch are appart the more need of a compensator coupling, if they were at the same point you don't need a compensator at all as the lengths allways are the same.
The long aft section on logging trucks and reach compensator couplings used now are maybe a later develpoment and are most likely more common after the model kits were made...the AMT Peerless Logging Trailer kit first came out in 1976 and the Ertl International Paystar 5000 Logger hit the shelves first in 1975.

Edited by Force
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What you guys are talking about is the compensator. It is not hydraulically controlled. As the truck turns, the compensator extends. When the truck straightens out, it slides back into the reach of the trailer. This is necessary because the distance between the bunks remains the same while turning, but the reach must extend. On a lot of the off road loggers the compensator is mounted in the truck chassis

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I get it now, Force explained it pretty good there so did Wudwrkr!!!!!! I knew it wasn't like a normal pump controlled hydraulic cylinder but was a movable cylinder to allow the in and out abilities.....

thanks again everyone for the help and info provided!!!!!! 

Edited by DrKerry
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