• Announcements

    • General Usage   05/10/2017

      If someone is acting badly, either in a forum or a private message, please report it. There are conveniently located buttons for sending the post to the moderators. 

Question for those who work in the 1:1 auto world

11 posts in this topic

Posted

For those who don't know I lost my father on 9/9 and with that happening I have ended up with a 1942 ford 9n tractor that mom wants to restore (That means me). It needs some body work and a couple of the dents look like it "stretched" the sheet metal, and I don't want to use extreme amounts of filler, so I'm looking for suggestions. The tractor does run but needs some work to the engine as well does anybody know a resource for that kind of stuff and I need to find a manual but I don't want to unnecessarily pay the price my local napa charges (real small town)

Thanks

Rich

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Here's the easy part. Ebay has a 9N shop manual reprint for about $11 plus about $4 shipping.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ford-Tractor-2N-8N-9N-Shop-Manual-I-T-Shop-Service-coil-binding-/263193789609?epid=2254445582&hash=item3d479284a9:g:TwwAAOSwyQtVj6qQ

Ebay is also a great source for parts.

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2047675.m570.l1313.TR2.TRC1.A0.H0.Xford+9n+tractor+parts.TRS0&_nkw=ford+9n+tractor+parts&_sacat=0

Now for the sheet metal. "Stretching" is usually identified by "oil-canning" after the dent is hammered out, though it's sometimes pretty obvious, as I assume it is in your case, when a panel has been struck with something like the round end of a a ball-pein hammer, or a bullet.

After repairing the dent as much as possible with a hammer and dolly, sheet-metal can be shrunk in several ways. The one I favor most uses heat from an oxy-acetylene torch.

This video will get you going in the right direction.      

 

 

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Fortunately, the N series Ford tractors are very easy to get parts for. Most parts are even still available from the dealers, which in this case would be any Case-IH-New Holland dealer (they bought out Ford/New Holland a few years ago).  Farm supply stores, like Tractor Supply, are another good source for parts.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

You might want to look into the- N-Newsletter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Thank guys  I'm sure I'll have some more questions later!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Im very sorry to hear about your loss Richard...you all have my thoughts and prayers.  I once was a auto technician for many years...happy to help in any way I can. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

On my 9N I have had good luck with http://www.tractorpartsinc.com/ also http://www.9nford.com/ for help and info as well as the N-Newsletter as mentioned along with New Holland for mechanical parts.....I have been off and on restoring mine as well ....not saying I have all the know how or answers but I would be happy to help out in anyway that I can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I really appreciate the help everyone, I'll look up more of the links for parts and guidance.

I will have to watch the video a few more times Bill but that is the kind of thing I was thinking of.

I will also check out the forums about the n-series tractors and I need to find the newsletter that was brought up.

THANKS AGAIN

RICH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

About 5 miles from my house there is a company that sells parts and restores N series Ford tractors.

They have a website. The business is called N-complete. 

Dennis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Look at Steiner tractor parts........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now