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andy12646

Wrinkled Paint - What Happened?

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5 hours ago, andy12646 said:

THANKS to you all for you input and recommendations in helping me further understand the many characteristics and compatibility of various paints and primers.

Duplicolor primers are my go-to 95% of the time. As noted, they're safe under all paints.

HOWEVER...they are "hot". They will craze some kit plastics if shot wet, so it's imperative to TEST on the kit you're working on.

You MAY find you can't shoot them dry enough (from the can) to avoid crazing without getting bad orange peel, but this can be overcome by decanting them and airbrushing very fine "mist" coats.

There is also a wide array of products in the Duplicolor primer family..."sandable" primers that are quite thin, in black, red, gray, "hot rod" dark gray, and white; "high build" or "scratch filler" primers in several colors (excellent for finish work over heavy body work, but too thick for general use, as they'll obscure fine detail); "self etching" primers in green, black, and red (hotter than the others, well suited to metal models and resin for better adhesion; and a "sealer" for which I've never found much use.

ALL the Duplicolor primers are sandable, except the sealer.

Some modelers like to use Duplicolor as a "barrier" coat, and shoot Tamiya or other hobby-specific primers over it. Again, TESTING of the combination of materials you want to use is IMPERATIVE EVERY TIME.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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I'll just echo some of what's been said.   I use rattle cans all of the time.  I use Duplicolor sandable primer on everything.  I use Duplicolor or Tamiya paints for color coats.  And then I'll use Tamiya clear if needed.  I generally don't have problems unless I wander from this...

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2 hours ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

Duplicolor primers are my go-to 95% of the time. As noted, they're safe under all paints.

HOWEVER...they are "hot". They will craze some kit plastics if shot wet, so it's imperative to TEST on the kit you're working on.

You MAY find you can't shoot them dry enough (from the can) to avoid crazing without getting bad orange peel, but this can be overcome by decanting them and airbrushing very fine "mist" coats.

There is also a wide array of products in the Duplicolor primer family"..."sandable" primers that are quite thin, in black, red, gray, "hot rod" dark gray, and white; "high build" or "scratch filler" primers in several colors (excellent for finish work over heavy body work, but too thick for general use, as they'll obscure fine detail); "self etching" primers in green, black, and red (hotter than the others, well suited to metal models and resin for better adhesion; and a "sealer" for which I've never found much use.

ALL the Duplicolor primers are sandable, except the sealer.

Some modelers like to use Duplicolor as a "barrier" coat, and shoot Tamiya or other hobby-specific primers over it. Again, TESTING of the combination of materials you want to use is IMPERATIVE EVERY TIME.

Well said...

 

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Ace-Garageguy has it right.

I spent alot of my life prepping and painting 1:1's... everything from county school buses, other fleet vehicles all the way to show cars that have sold for enormous money through Barrett-Jackson, I'm fairly well versed in paint and its application... though experimenting with new methods these days on styrene.

I just do not understand the logic of not testing on scrap before blowing down on $20- and up worth of kit just to have it backfire in your face.

I've shot ridiculously hot catalyzed automotive urethane over styrene with no primer at all from a HVLP gun with excellent results... but I TESTED on junk FIRST!

Here's the result... I did this at around 10yrs old before my long hiatus from car models.20200109_210201.thumb.jpg.03b05cbbcea1f5286268122e14a89552.jpg

I've ruined more bodies with hobby specific spray cans (I'm looking at you testors enamels!!) Than I have with anything else...

When I first returned to car models I built this Nova... I used Duplicolor perfect match grey primer wich is pretty hot and it crazed/etched the plastic... but that's not really a problem if you wait, wet sand and recoat and then wet sand again.

Result20180713_215640.thumb.jpg.fb1ff514c89b8376742b2d439b95268f.jpg

No evidence of etching after finishing correctly... and this is just buffed duplicolor perfect match red with no clear.

Always test first... as most paints can be made to work with the right process and corresponding materials and work put in by YOU.

I've recently just been using plain old testors enamel either decanted or from the jar in my airbrush, with no clear just buffing and polishing and it turns out fairly decent (at least to me)

Results

20191130_011119.thumb.jpg.40c3a691f6ab589f8e5f3b732a3663e7.jpg

I'm all for experimenting these days... but I always test before I take the plunge. As sometimes you can be left with useless plastic ready for the trash.

Model on!

-Leroy-

 

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