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Wrinkle Effect


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#1 Cien1986

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 06:37 AM

Dear MCM friends

 

i really like the wrinkle effect on this painted engine..

 

IMG_20140429_113804.jpg

 

i think this picture is from one of MCM member too, which i capture using phone cam..

i wonder how to do this paint effect..

anyone share the magic trick?

thanks...



#2 ImpalaBoy

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 07:03 AM

Seeing as how that's the transmission from my 1/12 '69 Camaro, I guess I might as well answer this :P  There really is no paint effect there; it's just the molded texture of the plastic, which I assume is replicating sand casting. All I did was paint it with Testor's aluminum enamel. I realize this doesn't exactly answer your question, as this is just the case with this particular kit. However, there are tricks and special types of paint that I'm sure other members, more experienced than myself, can tell you about.



#3 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 07:15 AM

You can achieve similar effects by shooting a fast-drying paint or primer, like lacquer, from farther away that you usually would. What you're trying to get is an exaggerated "orange-peel" texture.

 

It takes experimentation to get just the right look you're after, and sometimes you may have to shoot a dry, pebbly primer, sand off just a little of the tops of the bumps, and then spray a flow-coat of enamel to get something that looks exactly like what's pictured.



#4 my80malibu

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 07:22 AM

You can use Faux finish from scale motorsports to achieve the texture. Then spray it with aluminum color. I used the process on some Ferrari Valve covers it really works.

#5 Cien1986

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 07:46 AM

Seeing as how that's the transmission from my 1/12 '69 Camaro, I guess I might as well answer this :P  There really is no paint effect there; it's just the molded texture of the plastic, which I assume is replicating sand casting. All I did was paint it with Testor's aluminum enamel. I realize this doesn't exactly answer your question, as this is just the case with this particular kit. However, there are tricks and special types of paint that I'm sure other members, more experienced than myself, can tell you about.


Yeah i know its from mcm member but dont remember which one hahaha...
by the way its real great job there

#6 Cien1986

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 07:50 AM

You can use Faux finish from scale motorsports to achieve the texture. Then spray it with aluminum color. I used the process on some Ferrari Valve covers it really works.


Thanks for the information but.. unfortunately it dont ship to my country ....
i wonder if there is other method to use...

#7 Foxer

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 08:29 AM

There are many different texture paints in spray cans that can give similar effects. I see them in big box, auto and craft stores. I'd look around your area and see what you find. They usually have the top painted so you can get an idea what the texture would be like.



#8 hedotwo

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 08:46 AM

I use Testors Fabric Black alot. Nice texture for things like Hemi valve covers. Flat and gives a bit of a grainy texture. I think it comes in gray as well.


Rich

Edited by hedotwo, 03 May 2014 - 08:46 AM.


#9 jaydar

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 04:36 AM

It mightbe rasier to answer if we get the term right. There are two different surfaces cast and wrinkle. The cast is easier to recreate. I use Scale Motorsports fabric effect. Remember to use only an acrylic paint over it. I have not tried a wrinkle effect but i GUESS you could spray lacquer over acrylic wait for the inevitble cracking to occur then spray your final color?????
JUST A GUESS?

#10 mikevillena

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 06:02 AM

When replicating a rough cast texture I use a technique that I learned 30 years ago from an AVF (armoured fighting vehicle) modeller who uses this technique a lot on 1/35th scale cast tank turrets.... I apply a liberal wash of slow evaporating liquid cement (Testor's Liquid) over the surface and then I use a small brass bristle brush and rapidly tap the softened plastic.  Takes a bit of practice to get the feel for this so grab some scrap plastic and practice.  If there is too much texture, I carefully brush on another thin coat of the liquid cement to knock down the peaks a little.  Hope this helps.


Edited by mikevillena, 04 May 2014 - 06:03 AM.


#11 Cien1986

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 03:49 AM

wrinkleblackvalvecover.jpeg


found this on ace hardware
Special creating wrinkle effect on engine head cover

vht_wrinkle-fin-paint_11.jpeg


I believe it will work well
now the problem is... will the wrinkle scale enough...
so i spray on small test part... will update soon...

#12 soldier0829

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 05:14 AM

When replicating a rough cast texture I use a technique that I learned 30 years ago from an AVF (armoured fighting vehicle) modeller who uses this technique a lot on 1/35th scale cast tank turrets.... I apply a liberal wash of slow evaporating liquid cement (Testor's Liquid) over the surface and then I use a small brass bristle brush and rapidly tap the softened plastic.  Takes a bit of practice to get the feel for this so grab some scrap plastic and practice.  If there is too much texture, I carefully brush on another thin coat of the liquid cement to knock down the peaks a little.  Hope this helps.

 

This is the technique I use as well.   I think I got the idea from a Verlinden book. 



#13 Cato

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 06:02 AM



found this on ace hardware
Special creating wrinkle effect on engine head cover

I believe it will work well
now the problem is... will the wrinkle scale enough...
so i spray on small test part... will update soon...

Most of the wrinkle and high heat coatings rely on 1:1 engine heat to 'activate' them. May not work on plastic models.

Test on spoons first.



#14 Cien1986

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 03:50 PM

When replicating a rough cast texture I use a technique that I learned 30 years ago from an AVF (armoured fighting vehicle) modeller who uses this technique a lot on 1/35th scale cast tank turrets.... I apply a liberal wash of slow evaporating liquid cement (Testor's Liquid) over the surface and then I use a small brass bristle brush and rapidly tap the softened plastic.  Takes a bit of practice to get the feel for this so grab some scrap plastic and practice.  If there is too much texture, I carefully brush on another thin coat of the liquid cement to knock down the peaks a little.  Hope this helps.


Is this magic means we use slow dry cement to soften the plastic then use brush to add texture on it?
many thanks for sharing

#15 DriftingRookie

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 01:30 PM

I use Testors Fabric Black alot. Nice texture for things like Hemi valve covers. Flat and gives a bit of a grainy texture. I think it comes in gray as well.


Rich

You could actually lay down the flat black like he was sayin and after it dries lay down your aluminum and or steel

Edited by DriftingRookie, 08 May 2014 - 01:32 PM.


#16 Cien1986

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 07:51 AM

20140506_214634.jpg

Here is what i get from spraying to the end part of penbrush....
and it takes quite long to air dry it...
maybe it will dry faster when we heat it up abit with hair dryer
but not too hot...

#17 mikevillena

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 05:23 AM

What you have is a great example of "wrinkle" texture.  I've used the VHT Wrinkle paint before on the dashboard of an old Revell 1/24th scale Ferrari 250 GTO.  It took almost a week to cure fully.  It looked okay but the texture was slightly too large for the scale.  It might work okay if you are trying to replicate rustproofing on the underside of a road car.  Otherwise you should try ModelSport's spray.  For replicating "cast" texture, you need to experiment with other techniques. Sand cast texture is a lot finer.  This is in 1/24th scale:

IMG_1178_zpsa05993ee.jpg

You need to always keep the scale in mind otherwise it won't look right.  Always check reference photos.  You can find some here:

https://www.google.c...k.html;1000;750