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W Humble

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Everything posted by W Humble

  1. Printing or resin; it would be a great accessory! The Moebius are best because they are multi-part, the old ones were just outer wheel halves, though very realistic if detailed. Buick had beautiful finned drums, but PMD had the complete system, with special rims also. The Cad (etc.) Sabre wheels were very special, too, and didn't the '56 Continental have something similar, or the same? Quite a few luxury cars used the K-H wire wheels; Cad, Buick and Chrysler. Others?
  2. PMD considered the option using wide-8 rims for the '63 Tempests, I understand, maybe as 15-in. The steel rims on 1;1 cars show up painted shades of silver or gray, often. I put them on every old Poncho kit I build, even my replica of the '61-2 Tempest 'Monte Carlo' roadster show car (which should have had 15-in. Halibrands. One VK/AF illustration in the big 1966 dealer brochure of a LeMans faintly shows K-H rims/drums. Disc brakes option by then, drums on the way out.
  3. The Moebius 1961 Ventura kit has some beauties. Several of the year-of-mfr AMT kits have them, and at least one (don't recall who) other kit maker had them; very shallow, like wheel covers. Kelsey-Hayes, aluminum hubs with painted steel 8-lug rims ('wide 8") that used 1-2 types of snap-on beauty rings. Wick
  4. With plenty of oil/dirt on the PowerGlide, that works. Not that Stovies were markedly leaky, only average. My SBC's like to drool from the front and rear seals, even with the new type. Gaskets and shellac sealants were pretty mediocre, back in the day. I find that going much beyond adding plug wires is hard for me at age 76, tho the VA gave me carpal tunnel on my right wrist; sometimes I do fuel lines, etc. Looks good in a very use way!
  5. Steve, yep, my bro and I (c. 1968) were going to do that with a '65 Tempest 2-dr post 'grandma' car but using a 327 we had, maybe lucky we didn't. I got drafted! Before that, I had a '65 Tempest Custom 2-dr HT, 2-bbl. 326/ three-speed that I just loved! Good ole' A-body; Tiger Paw redlines, 4-4-2 rear sway bar, chrome-reverse rims, and mellow exhaust... fun car! Using an AMT GTO kit, I built it as close as I could: modified '55 Chevy front bench, delete hood scoop, console, etc. and added a strip of Plastruct teensy rectangular strip for the side chrome. Changing the grille was harder. I am also doing a version of my first car, a '55 Chevy 'post' Delray (one side with the long lakes pipes, and Hollywood moon caps, the other without lakes and baby moons as I eventually drove it) AND my '51 Ford Club Coupe from the AMT '49 kit. This is a toughie for me; wish there was a resin conversion available. Luckily, I got it from my wife's nutty cousin with the grille already out ('the gasser look'), but making the chrome tail-light housings is difficult, plus no appropriate lenses. I have a plethora of 240Z kits in various scales to build my '70 Z car that NISSAN USA bought back from me, but haven't started one yet. Live long enough... BTW, I'm in Chico. (No pics of above yet.)
  6. Wait; wasn't the 1964-65 Tempest a 215 cu.in. oddball? It didn't have any performance options, but the GTO came on the scene... !
  7. Pay attention to what is posted about the different GM six families. Remember, the 194-230-2560 (& 292)cu.in. began in 1962, with the Chevy II/Nova. Previous to that was the 235 family, which began as a truck engine during WWII, and was of course adapted to the early Corvette. Built simultaneously until about 1953 (?) was the old 'Stovebolt Six' 216.5 cu.in., a Chevy standby but with dubious oiling which was remedied in the 235. Before that, there were similar sixes including ones with updraft carburetion. Right? (The six, nice as it is, in the '51 kits is the 216.5, even with the aftermarket head not accurate for other eras.) The 230 was used in the A-body Pontiac Tempest/LeMans as a base engine in 1964-65, then replaced by the SOHC six in 1966-67. How I wanted Pontiac to produce the Banshee 2-seater with the 215-hp. version of that engine, plus 4-speed!! When I ETS'd from the Army, it was but a misty memory, though the Sprint option had been sold in the Firebirdy those two years. I bought a new Datsun 240Z; very strong and thrifty SOHC six in a sporty GT package; still have one! Note: the Sprint OHC is not the same block as the Nova, etc. six; it was a special casting altogether, and distinctive. Check it on the web. Olds and Buick; I dunno. Anyhow, if building 'stock' be sure you have the right block package to begin with, as they definitely look very different, and were even moreso internally. The '60 engine would undoubtedly fit, but not be correct -- if that is a criteria on the Nova wagon kit. Now, as to an LS...
  8. I don't know what kit it came from, but I have some misc. parts for a Pontiac OHC 6 in my junk drawers; wish I had it all! Also some Jag SOHC parts, but no block.' Pay attention to what is posted about the different GM six families. Remember, the 194-230-2560 (& 292)cu.in. began in 1962, with the Chevy II/Nova. Previous to that was the 235 family, which began as a truck engine during WWII, and was of course adapted to the early Corvette. Built simultaneously until about 1953 (?) was the old 'Stovebolt Six' 216.5 cu.in., a Chevy standby but with dubious oiling which was remedied in the 235. Before that, there were similar sixes including ones with updraft carburetion. Right? (The six, nice as it is, in the '51 kits is the 216.5, even with the aftermarket head not accurate for other eras.) The 230 was used in the A-body Pontiac Tempest/LeMans as a base engine in 1964-65, then replaced by the SOHC six in 1966-67. How I wanted Pontiac to produce the Banshee 2-seater with the 215-hp. version of that engine, plus 4-speed!! When I ETS'd from the Army, it was but a misty memory, though the Sprint option had been sold in the Firebirdy those two years. I bought a new Datsun 240Z; very strong and thrifty SOHC six in a sporty GT package; still have one! Note: the Sprint OHC is not the same block as the Nova, etc. six; it was a special casting altogether, and distinctive. Check it on the web. Olds and Buick; I dunno. Anyhow, if building 'stock' be sure you have the right block package to begin with, as they definitely look very different, and were even moreso internally.
  9. I needed a 1/25 six to build an 'accurate' model of my brother's nice '56 F-100 (a second-owner creampuff with the original 223 cu.in. OHV six) and I just happened to have a 1963 Rambler American coupe, bought in '63, of course; it was a remarkably close approximation of the Ford, even to the grooves in the valve cover, as I recall. Just added a flathead V-8 air filter, and painted it yellow/silver. The old 223 is a great engine, if treated well; possibly better than the Chevy 235, which was pretty good. The AMC kit? Became an early funny car, with 392 hemi from AMT Buick Special wagon kit, and wheels from Munster Coach. All bought/built 'back in the day'.
  10. Got that one; I was in high school/college then! * The Pontiac OHC six was also expected to be cheaper to produce, and light on fuel -- excpept for the HO 207 hp. version. Hurst and C/D magazine swapped one into an XK-E and ran it at the drags; no slouch! The smaller DOHC Jag went back in it later, they say. I'm sort of experienced 7with the Datsun L24-L28 engine, a pretty hot six that got by with both manifolds on the same side, as well as the L16-L20B fours, having bought a new 240Z in July of '70, restored it, and sold it back to Nissan USA in '95. Datsun built a cross-flow head for the L24 for their rally team, but few have ever been seen since then, darnit! Also, there are a number of Skyline GTR (etc.; not my field ) engines around; a Z-expert friend is building one for his restomod '70 Z. He just sold his 2.0-L DOHC race motor brought back from Japan. Bill Fisher and friends campaigned a streamlined Z special at Bonneville; 'Inliners Club', again. OC, the inline six is and has been a big performance number in the rest of the world, so few V-8's there. It takes more money to get power from our sixes than need be spent for a SBC or Ford, etc., to say nothing about LS motors. My modeling thing now is V-12's, easy to cobble up from two V-8 kit engines, usually. I have a very old HAWK M-B GP car DOHC V-12 that I'd like to have duplicated in resin (can't find anyone to teach the craft to me!!) or 3-D printing. I want to 'fake' a phantom Miller V-12 for a roadster I'm building from a 1930 Caddie glue-bomb. Using Bugatti 'mag' wheels; but did you know Harry A. Miller designed the originals (12-spokers) much earlier for his T-N-T racer series cars? He built a few sixes too. *A local guy ran a Willys two-door sedan gasser (C class, I think, NHRA) with a Ford FLATHEAD six, and it did really well too. Success went to his head, and he succumbed to a SBC and moved up two classes, with less good result vs. other V-8s. It was flat-black primer, with a big cartoon buzzard on the deck lid. Thx for the msg! Wick
  11. I meant 1977; I'm old, but not that old! Wick
  12. Leans, of course because it is the passenger's side half of the Poncho 389 V-8! I wrote the first article on this car for SPECIAL INTEREST AUTOS back in 1077, when I could still interview most of the guys who built it. Not DeLorean, darn it, but Bunky Knudsen, Bill Collins, Mal MacKellar, Fred Timpner, Hulki Aldikachti (sp?), and also Mickey Thompson! I drove new ones when I was a lot-bot at the local Pontiac/Buick/GMC dealer, but this is the first I've owned. As far as I know, it was the only stock four cylinder ever produced with the 4-bbl. option. (also offered Buick 215 cu.in. aluminum V-8, but less than 2% sold, vs. four.) Four always equalled the V-8 horsepower; 166 hp. highest, but a special racing version was produced with it's own trick 4-bbl. intake, etc. 166 = 1/2 of 333 hp. GTO mill, btw. Mine is lower compression version, not 10.75:1 of top offering. I built a version of the 'AMT '61 Tempest "Monte Carlo" show car, using a genuine '62 AMT LeMans four -- all begun in '62 and only completed sixty years later!! At GM, Cad used the 'MC' name first, then for this roadster, Pontiac, before it ended up at Chevy. None actually raced there, but one 421 Tempest could have, able to outrunm Grand Sports Corvettes, and Ferrari GTOs. I'd attach pics, but I'm not good at that at age 76. Look online; some are accuate.
  13. I think it was Holman & Moody that did the Falcon kit; was in HRM. Maybe Bill Stroppe? Not much access to ports! A lot of casting fuss just to avoid gasketing? This IS starting to sound like a Hemmings forum!
  14. Casey, that design seems like a horrible idea, to me. CHEVROLET INLINE SIX-CYLINDER POWER MANUAL, by Leo Santucci (& Bill Fisher) is a great resource for building Chevy sixes, but in truth, it refers mostly to the high-deck truck versions that make the max power. (California Bill's Automotive Handbooks, Tucson, AZ) I met Bill when I signed the contract for my book HOW TO RESTORE YOUR DATSUN Z-CAR, back in 1984; very interesting hot-rod pioneer. I've been considering how to convert TWO AMT Chevy 216.5 cu.in. sixes into a Franken-V-12... Fisher heads, etc.!
  15. I honestly think I've only SEEN one C-II four banger 'in the wild'. The Pontiac Tempest four, now... got '62 LeMans ragtop, four with four-barrel. My original point was that in Greenbergs kit review he mentioned that the vacant engine compartment of the model could be filled with the six from the 1960 Chevy pickup kit, but that was the old 235 cu.in., not the C-II/Nova 194 (later 230-250) engine, thus would be incorrect as a factory-stock build. Might have made an interesting swap, at that, but the SBC was what we all were anticipating, not more sixes. Never cared much for the C-II/Nova line myself, tho we had a low-mileage '67 (4-dr, 250/three-speed) example for over 20 years. A real underachiever in most categories. The SS V-8, however... Wait; I thought they were homely! IMHO
  16. Not exactly the I.D. -- but very interesting engine; lots of details available on Hemming Motor News forums recently. The Chevy II four was never a big seller in 1962-4, and the V-8 Novas (deluxe package for C-II) were hotly anticipated.
  17. In the kit review, it is stated that "...the powerplant from the AMT '60 Chevy pickup kit is the right motor for the vintage Nova," but I believe that this is the venerable 235-cu.in. six that debuted in trucks during WWII and later became standard for PowerGlide equipped cars in the early 'fifties. Yes, or no? The Chevy II and more deluxe Nova had a mini-six of 194-cu.in. that was all new, along with it's 230-250-cu.in. bretheren (both of which eventually powered the model, along with small-blocks) which is NOT of the 235-family, and of quite different internals. The 194 was spec'd to compete with the Ford Falcon 144-cu.in. six, which had proven quite popular -- running over, as it were, the Corvair boxer six, in sales at least. The 194 looked almost like the 230-250, as most changes were internal, and it used a number of SBC Chevy parts inside! To save dough, it did not have a counterweighted crankshaft, and there was some other cost-cutting aspects that don't concern modelers. However, using the 235-series would be incorrect, and they looked significantly different. I've owned and driven 'em all, and restored them too. (At various stages of it's life, we had all three displacement '62-up sixes in our '51 Chevy, with Saginaw all-synchro three and four speeds, and now a T-5 five-speed to abet the mild 350 V-8.) SO: I don't know if any kits do have the correct block type; MCW probably would be the best bet. Later truck sixes in this family grew much bigger (higher decks), and can be made to run like [insert simile] !!i It seems bizarre to me, a builder of car kits since about 1957, aircraft and the rest since 1953, that any car kit would be sold with an empty engine bay! Maybe they want us to put in a BBC, or Arias Hemi conversion? Certainly I knew of several 1:1 Nova drivers who had SBC's before 1964, courtesy of the wrecking yards. I would have. Wick Age 76
  18. 10-4: I actually could have bought 'Falfa's '55' Chevy from AMERICAN GRAFITTI back in about 1978 (or thereabouts) at the Harrah's Reno swap meet -- for $3K! -- and it was deplorable. Well, as Ziggy said, 'When my ship came in, I was waiting at the airport!' Remember, even by the late 'seventies, three big ones would still buy a new or near-new car. I'd done several '55s by then (my first car was a '55 Delray 2-door with all the right parts, when it was six years old) and I would have ruined the movie car by restoring it. I'm having fun planning more dioramas, but they're a lot of work. Thanks for the encouragement. Wick
  19. How about the G&J bullet-style headlites? I'd like to buy sets of both, if available. Making to apochrypal Harry Miller street machines. Wick
  20. I have not been able to contact Custom Squads by Tony; a few years back I bought their CHP/Nevada/LAPD decal set for the old CHP stars. Now I've LOST the set I cut out from the big sheet, and can't finish my JoHan 1960 Chrysler CHP match racer (old Dukes Charger chassis, etc. and 426) I guess. Have the new set, but... Any info? Anyone have those decals (old style only) to swap? Thanks, WIck
  21. I'm working on a Strombecker Scarab 'slot racer' kit I bought new in the late '50s, and converting it is a challenge! I do have the original decal sheet, however. I'd like to resin copy the Hali's as they are pretty nice -- and one of mine has a damaged rim. Question; where does a modeler find tires to work with these old kits? The rubber tires that came with mine disappeared long ago! Anyone make resin copies? Alas, I used to have 2-3 sets. *I packed up all my original car kits (poorly) in 1968, before being drafted during VietNam, not knowing if I'd return, and the carton took some rough handling; many were broken and have taken eons to rebuild now. I gave all the armor, ships and planes to a neighbor kid, who probably blew them up with firecrackers... I have need of the old Firestone style scale 15-inchers for several kits I'm doing, incl a dual Cad V-16 Bonneville semi-streamliner that I'm using the remains of a Monogram Indy car/gluebomb to create. Nothing looks like those old 'Stones! Help?! Wick at 75 ano -- don't wait too long!
  22. I really need a car hood from the thirties/forties to make a boat-tail speedster 'Miller' phantom. Any 1936-48 1:25 or 24 the scale from Ford, Chevy or what have you; not something NICE but from a glue-bomb or salvage/parts'box stash. My trade parts are very old, mostly early '60s, if I can help you out. Please help a 75 year old modeler, veteran, retired teacher/author?! Wick
  23. Exotics_Builder, Do you still have the LeMans ragtop kit? I bought a 1;1 car last fall, have been searching for this kit. What would you consider a reasonable trade? Want to attempt a PM? Wick, 74 yoa and still modeling
  24. In 1963, I caught a ride back to Shasta College (Redding, CA) through a horrible snow storm -- in the dark-- in a 1960 Chev four-door crew truck owned by a fellow student's father ( a logger in Alturas, CA) and luckily it was AWD; we made the 150 miles safely. Yes, SHE drove all the way! We called such pickups 'Crummies' in those dear dead days; dunno' if that was a regional thing, or what. My little bro drove one for the Southern Pacific to pick up train crews in the '60s when he was assistant yard clerk. He hates to recall it, but the first dawn pickup he made was at a local coffee shop, and in the icy parking lot he lost her and rammed the side of the building. He was being kidded about that one until he left for a better job... So: if I got a Dodge resin cab, what kit would you recommend that I source for a chassis (2WD dualie) and please, one that's in production currently? Thanks! Wick
  25. 1962 Pontiac Tempest LeMans kit, AMT wanted: just bought a real one! Trade Monogram Rolls roadster kit and/or cash for useable example or new. Wick
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