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Plastheniker

1953 Mack W-71 Integral Sleeper (AITM Cab) & Canvas Top Trailer (Scratch Built)

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Thanks for the recent replies!

 

I am looking forward to your finished model.

If you think any further information supplementing my post of 3 August would be useful please let me know.

Juergen, i did not notice your post of August 3rd, thank you very much, it's all clear now, i tried this on the two holders of the exhaust stack and now i know what i did wrong. I did wrap the wire only one time. My model is not as good as yours, because i did not work enough on the resin-surface. But it's okay for me, that was the first full resin kit that i build up. The next will get better (hopefully :D).

Greetings, Michael

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Impressive rig!!! I have never had much luck with resin, after seeing this, I am going to try again. Great job!!!

Juergen, i did not notice your post of August 3rd, thank you very much, it's all clear now, i tried this on the two holders of the exhaust stack and now i know what i did wrong. I did wrap the wire only one time. My model is not as good as yours, because i did not work enough on the resin-surface. But it's okay for me, that was the first full resin kit that i build up. The next will get better (hopefully :D).

Greetings, Michael

 

Jürgen, would you consider a tutorial about your way of preparing resin surfaces? Your resin cabs look as smooth as glass.

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Thanks for the latest comments!

 

 

 

 

Jürgen, would you consider a tutorial about your way of preparing resin surfaces? Your resin cabs look as smooth as glass.

My personal recipe is rather simple:

Step 1: on any surface filling and sanding, filling and sanding, filling and sanding, ...   :(

Step 2: finally I drybrush critical areas with Revell or Humbrol chrome silver. This thin layer reveals all remaining surface flaws and can be removed with turpentine          easily without attacking the surface. If I spot any flaws back to step 1! :angry:

Step 3: Unless the colour of the plastic requires a prime coat I never use primer on styrene or ABS in order to keep my paintwork as thin as possible. I use primer on resin when I don't trust my surface preparation. I always use primer on metal surfaces for sufficient paint adhesion.

 

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I conjectured some sophisticated fillers, primers or paints. :wacko:

I have just tried the silver drybrush on a filled and sanded seam. Indeed imperfections became visible where before the surface seemed to be perfect. Very simple but effective. Thanks for sharing this!

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Excellent.  What bits do you use for the interior switches?

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Thanks for the replies!

 

Excellent.  What bits do you use for the interior switches?

Making dashboard switches is simple, fast and inexpensive.

 

  • pull-switches (as on the W-71 dashboard): Use easily available metal head pins with standard shaft diameters (mostly 0.6 to 0.7mm). Insert a pin into a rotary tool. Insert a cutting wheel (no matter if emery or diamond) into a second rotary tool. When both are running reduce the diameter of the pin head to a cylindical shape. Then cut off the pointed end of the pin to get a handy length. As described above when making chrome bezels use bright wire to make rings with an inside diameter slightly bigger than the shaft diameter of the pin. Such a ring simulates the visible nut that fixes the 1:1 switch onto the dashboard. Slip a ring onto the finished pin, drill a hole into the dasboard, insert the unit and fix it with super glue.

  • toggle switches (as on the F dashboard): Use a piece of bright wire of an appropriate diameter (for 1/25 usually 0.4mm should work). With a plier with smooth jaws press one end flat. Cut both ends to the desired length. As described above when making chrome bezels use bright wire to make rings with an inside diameter slightly bigger than the diameter of the piece of wire. Slip a ring onto the finished piece of wire, drill a hole into the dasboard, insert the unit and fix it with super glue. Bend the rocker switch up or down.

 

Edited by Plastheniker

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Thanks for sharing another trick. I think it would be great if you compile all your techniques applied on your resin cabs in one comprehensive tutorial.

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I just fell in love. In a truck! You can't tell anyone ... 😆

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Thanks for bringing this one back up stenfalk, never seen it the first time around. This combo is a perfect match, tractor and trailer are super impressive and compliment each other!

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Thanks for the latest replies, nice to see that there is still some interest in my older topics.

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