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GrandpaMcGurk

Custom 1957 Chevy Aero

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I'm interested to see how you're going to pull this off. This could end up as a very cool custom build.

David G.

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Looking great so far. Always cool to see someone doing something new to a classic.

As for the fastback, my suggestion would be to make it a smooth transition windshield to trunk and make it merge with the curve of the rear of the trunk lid. Make it look factory like the early '50s Chevy Fastbacks. A phantom '57 Fastback Bel Air!

Either way, I'll be watching. Keep up the great work!

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Thanks a million guys, you're coming up with some great ideas on the fast back.

Andrew, I like the idea of the '50s Chevy fastback roof line but I'm concerned that all those voluptuous Mae West compound curves would clash too much with the sharp edged '57 Chevy fins. If I carried the roof line all the way back in a more angular fashion it would look too much like a '65 Charger. Some folks aren't going to like the fastback concept no matter what I do but one way or another it's getting one.

How about you Harry.......got any Photo-shop fast back magic for a '57 bow tie? I'm open for suggestions.

Well, on to the plastic welding....here's how I do it.

Keep in mind that melting plastic stinks and I'm sure it can't be good for you. I'd also like to suggest that if you try it yourself PRACTICE ON JUNK FIRST!!!!!

It's really easy to warp and screw up plastic if too much heat is applied in one area. Not to mention burning the heck out of your digits.

I have probably a half dozen of these heating irons varying in wattage, for what I'm doing here these cheapo low watt "wood burning" deals work just fine.

I also have a bunch of tips, some I buy other I make out of brass rod. Anyway on to the how to stuff......

As you can see in the photos I'm using Red Green clamps (you can never have too much duct tape) to hold the body seams together.

Aplsweld001.jpg

Aplsweld003.jpg

Edited by GrandpaMcGurk

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The first step is to "spot weld" the two sections together, once this is done on both insides of the body I recheck measurements to make sure nothing has shifted or warped. It's important to tack and then move away from the hot spot for the next tack to prevent warping or burn through. You can come back and add more tacks in between as they cool.

Aplsweld005.jpg

Aplsweld006.jpg

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When I'm satisfied that everything is where it belongs I "stitch weld" the entire length of the seam welding a short length, skip a short area then welding another short area, by moving around as I've described no one area gets hot enough to warp the plastic. Just make sure your welds are deep enough to fuse the two sections of plastic together.

Aplsweld009.jpg

Edited by GrandpaMcGurk

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The last step on the inside of the body is to weld a thin strip of plastic or rod (filler) over the stitch weld smoothing it out as you go along. A lot like real welding...huh?

Aplsweld014.jpg

Aplsweld011.jpg

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I shot a little primer on the weld after lightly sanding any real rough spots so that it would show up better in the photo.....no I didn't primer it to prevent my weld from rusting, LOL.

Aplsweld016.jpg

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On the outside of the body there is no need to spot or stitch weld. Simply run a filler bead the length of the seam. Any pinholes or low spots can be filled at this time. What we have now is a very strong bond because for all intent and purposes it a solid piece of plastic again. Now final sanding can be done and if any bondo is needed it will be a very small amount and no glue was used. Best part is I won't have to worry about ghost lines, filler lifting or shrinkage showing up later in my paint.

Aplsweld020.jpg

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Amazing work. Drop a hemi in it.

Thanks Rick....but it's getting a 409 with 2 fours.

Edited by GrandpaMcGurk

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This is real interesting. I have a built one of these that someone gave me. Needs to be redone. Getting some crazy ideas here. In one picture of the back of this car it almost looks like a Henry J. Real interesting. Ken

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This is coming along nicely. The section looks good and your welding technique is inspiring. I'm keeping an eye on this one!

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Whoa. I have done the same sort of welding with strip stock and Tenax.

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Well, the more I looked at pics and listened to input from you folks, I decided to scrap the fastback top I had mocked up and go with more of a '50's Classic Sweptline look.

I dug through the parts box and came up with this 1/8th scale chunk of an XKE.

I'll cut the roof off the Jag, narrow it, manipulate, twist, cuss, bend and otherwise beat it into submission. I'll also have to cut the entire "trunk" section out of the 1/12 "57 as I want the new roof to flow down to the rear pan while maintaining the distinctive Chevy fins.................. sounds voluptuous if I can pull it off.

Amaso006-1.jpg

Amaso004.jpg

Amaso003.jpg

Amaso002-2.jpg

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:blink: :blink: :blink:

Whoa!

This is simply "AMAZING" Don!!

I am really digging your concept here!

Gonna watching!

Thank You for sharing

Later

Russ

;)

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Looks Great Don!!!

The sectioning made a big difference...

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Here's an update....

The sectioning is complete and rough sanded.....still haven't used any bondo.

I'm cutting a section out of the Jag roof to narrow it.

Amaso1001.jpg

Amaso1004.jpg

I save the cut off pieces to use as filler when I start welding the top on.....they are the same thickness and type of plastic so I won't have any issues fusing them together.

I taped the halves together and set it on the Chevy to do some eyeballin'.

Amaso1007.jpg

Here's where I need to take my time and get the Jag top to fit as closely as possible to the Chevy body. A section was cut from the roof and I started to remove a chunk of the trunk.

I rough cut the trunk opening undersized so that I have enough material left to nibble away at a little at time.....like the man sez "it's easier to remove material than it is to have to fill in big openings".

Amaso1008.jpg

Amaso1010.jpg

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