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Large scale model shipping-coast to coast

9 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

I'm contemplating shipping an assembled, near museum quality Pocher nearly 3000 miles. It will weigh at least 25 pounds and have a glass case. So maybe 40-50 pounds.

Anyone have experience with packaging such a large, heavy model without it destroying itself? Maybe the commission builders?

I'm trying to figure how to mount it solidly and protect it at the same time. Haven't got many good plans yet. Afraid of things like snapped-off parts and broken glass.

I have shipped fair-sized, framed artwork (glass and mats) with no damage such a distance but this is beyond my experience.

My Exoto 1/10th GT-40 came encased in a form-fitting 2 part foam block and a box designed to size. I have no way to duplicate that styrofoam though.

Lacking a definite method, I realize I may have to scrap the idea. Any advice appreciated.

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Posted · Report post

I've never tried this yet, but I may have to soon.

My idea is take a plastic bag, spray that expanding foam into it then , while it's expanding set both the model and the bag in a box. that way the foam kind of surrounds the model as it forms inside the box .

I would try it without the model first to make sure the foam doesn't react with the bag,,, and melt thru it,,, so to speak

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Posted · Report post

Nooooo WAY! I myself wouldn't dream of it unless it was a commissioned build and the buyer asumed all responsibility and I could insure it for full value. Whatever you do, don't even consider USPS, or UPS. The only choice for something like this is Fed-EX. Yes, you'll pay four times the others for the shipping but if I know anything about playing odds and averages I go with Fed-ex every time.

Good luck. I sincerely hope this works out for you whatever you decide.

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Posted · Report post

Find a shipper / packer for artwork. They will crate it and you will spend a lot of money.

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Posted · Report post

I'm not an expert, but first thing is that I would pack and ship the model and case separate, so there's not two pieces that could collide in a package.

Next, I've been told guys will take the model and completely wrap it solid with toilet paper. Then place it in a box completely suspended in packing peanuts so it has no place to wiggle. The take a larger box and suspend the box containing the model in it completely surrounded by peanuts. I just got three built models shipped to me in this fashion (1/25 scale vehicles) and there was no damage at all, from Ohio to PA. I think a package going coast to coast wouldn't get much more handling since the majority of the distance would be in a plane.

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Posted · Report post

I have quite a bit of experience with this, as I have sent quite a few of my 1/12 builds all over the world. I am on the east coast and I have shipped at least 3 or 4 to California.

What I have found works for me is finding a secure location under the car, a place that is solid and can easily support the weight of the entire car, and firmly fasten it to some kind of base that is strong and will not move around inside the box. For my Corvettes, I wrapped some pretty hefty wire around certain areas of the frame and secured them. I then wrapped the entire car in lots of TP(wont scratch) and then filling the box up to the top with bubble wrap, making sure the box is completely filled with bubble wrap not giving the model a chance to move. Also, before putting the car and base in the box, you will probably want to put several layers of bubble wrap in the box where the base will sit. The point is to keep any bump or vibration to transfer directly to the base/car. Once the box is sealed, I take another larger box, fill it with packing peanuts until there is about 3" of peanuts at the bottom, and put the box with the model inside, and then fill the larger box with more peanuts around the sides and top. Then seal the larger box and ship.

All that said, some times it seems no matter how you pack it, they will find some way to destroy it. I swear some of mine were thrown on the floor, run over by a forklift, and then flew out the back of the truck in transit. I received a couple of my models back in a box of loose parts. I will say though, my last 5-6 went out and there were no issues at all, and the last 3 went coast to coast.

I went with USPS for shipping because their prices were cheaper at the time, and I never had anything damaged through them, if you can believe that!

Good luck!

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Posted · Report post

Very excellent tips from each of you-most appreciated. I've got to study each method and maybe combine for my particular piece.

Thanks all. ;)

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Tom has a good idea about double boxing. I recieved a delicate resin built up packaged that way and it arrived perfectly.

Edited by Draggon

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Posted · Report post

Tom has a good idea about double boxing. I recieved a delicate resin built up packaged that way and it arrived perfectly.

Yes he does. I've sent framed glass art that way successfully.

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