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Force

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About Force

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    MCM Ohana

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  • Scale I Build
    1:24-1:25

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  • Location
    Umea, Sweden
  • Full Name
    HÃ¥kan Persson

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  1. May I have another input there. The radiator from the Thunderbolt is not correct as the Thunderbolts used a cross flow big block radiator from a Galaxie to cool the 427 FE High Riser engine, the small block Fairlanes used the same radiator as the small block Mustangs.
  2. The chassis from the Thunderbolt is perfect for this as the 1962-65 Fairlanes and the 1962-63 Meteor shares the basic platform and is the only Ford/Mercury cars who do so, so they are closely related. Many may think the Falcon/Mustang platform works but it's kind of close but it's definately not the same as the Fairlane/Meteor platform is slightly larger and differs in several places...I used to own a 1964 Fairlane and guess how I know this. I will for sure follow this build. One thing if you are going to do a street car, the leafs and brackets are right but take off the traction bars as they are racing only and maybe change the rear end to an 8 inch as I belive it was standard on the Meteor and Fairlane, I don't know if the 9 inch was on the option list even for the 289 HP 4-speed cars.
  3. Yes, I would like to see one of the model companies do a Featherlite Race Transporter Trailer, there are other manufacturers with similar trailers too, but Featherlite is the most popular transporter trailer among racing teams out there as they are used by NASCAR teams, NHRA and other Drag Racing teams, Indycar teams, Sprint Car teams and many others. AMT did an attempt to do racing transporter trailers back in the very early 90's but that was their old Trailmobile moving van, wich first saw daylight back in 1972, with an interior and some racing equipment and is not anywhere near what they use today...and even back when they did it. Italeri did racing transporter combinations but it's an European style with a single drive truck and a short box trailer and nothing like the 53 foot long dual drive conventional truck US syle transporters wich are a lot cooler looking. I believe a modern US style race transporter trailer would sell good as teams in all kinds of racing divisions use them so there are many options for model builders to do. Maybe Moebius is up for the challenge to do one as it would go well with their International trucks.
  4. Very nice. But I'm puzzled, air condition in a Stock category racing car... I don't think that is required by the rules as it's not standard equipment.
  5. Yeah, especially if the rear axles has posi differentials.
  6. You might get more answers if you change the header of this topic to 1969 Shelby Mustang instead of only Mustang. Revell has two 1969 Mustang kits and two 1969 Shelby kits in 1:25th scale, and the rear panels are not the same between them, the Shebly GT 500 Convertible and Coupe has the same part but the Mustang Mach 1 and Boss 302 panel is different.
  7. Or maybe Moroso, they looks to be stamped steel anyway.
  8. I'm surprised that there aren't more of the recent Mustang, Camaro and Challenger "muscle cars" on the market, they are popular so I think the demand is there and I would for sure buy them if there were any available. I really like the Factory Stock and Factory Super Stock drag racing versions and I would like to be able to build them, likewise with some of the road racing cars, the only available one is the Mustang GT4 from Tamiya, but that's a curbside with no engine and I don't like that, but if it was a full detail kit with a detailed engine bay I would have bought it allready.
  9. Yeah I do, it's about five miles long and around 200 feet wide.
  10. Yes you can transport a complete Cat 390, but there are some limitations you have to take in consideration, like weight, hight and width, how far you have to transport it, and if there are any bridges, overpasses or tunnels on the route. Where I live you can have a gross weight of 64 metric tons on most of the road network and you need a special permit as a broken down Cat 390 is still too heavy and too wide. The complete machine weighs 86-90 metric tons depending on version, around 200000 lbs, so they usually take off the counterweight, the stick and the bucket, so what they transport is the basic machine with the boom only and it's still too heavy, the taken off parts are transported on another trailer or maybe two. When transported the machine straddles the trailer and is blocked up as the track width at 4.41 meters, 14.5 ft, is too wide for most trailers, so the tracks are hanging free outside of the trailer bed just over the ground, the machine is quite high at 4.89 meters, 16.08 ft, to the top of cab and that's another reason for getting it as low as possible when transported so you can clear overpasses and tunnels. On the 5 mile road construction project where I work right now we have two Cat 374F's, one Cat 352F, three Cat 336F's (one is a long reach) and some smaller Volvo excavators like one EC 290, two EC 250's, one EC 220, one EW 170 and one EW 160, one Cat D8 dozer, seven wheel loaders, one Cat 988, one Cat 980, one Volvo L90, two L70's and two L60's, eight Volvo Dumpers, three A40's two A30's and three A25's, one Cat 140M grader and two Cat Compactors, one CS68B and one CS66B. We have downsized some since last winter so some machines are sent away as there were more earler, but the ones I mentioned above is what we have right now. So I have seen my fare share of machine transports lately.
  11. Where I live you can have a gross weight of 64 metric tons on the roads so you need a special permit as a broken down Cat 390 is still too heavy and too wide. The complete machine weighs 86-90 metric tons tons depending on version, around 200000 lbs, so they usually take off the counterweight, the stick and the bucket, so what they transport is the basic machine with the boom only and the taken off parts on another trailer or maybe two. When transported the machine straddles the trailer and is blocked up as the track width is too wide for most trailers at 4.41 meters, 14.5 ft, so the tracks are hanging free outside of the trailer bed just over the ground, the machine is quite high at 4.89 meters, 16.08 ft, to the top of cab and that's another reason for getting it as low as possible when transported so you can clear overpasses and tunnels.
  12. Kenworth stopped with white engines after 1975 and Peterbilt after 1984, after that engine manufacturer colors with a few exceptions as there were some white engines after and some manufacturer colored engines before.
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