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what type of airbrush do you use?


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Poll: Airbrush. single or dual action? (57 member(s) have cast votes)

what is your favorite all around modeling airbrush of choice. Singe action, dual, other?

  1. Single action. (19 votes [31.15%])

    Percentage of vote: 31.15%

  2. Voted Dual action. (39 votes [63.93%])

    Percentage of vote: 63.93%

  3. I only use spraycans. (3 votes [4.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.92%

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#21 Longbox55

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 03:22 PM

Check out the local Sears or big box hardware stores (Lowes, Menards). You can find a good compact air compressor with a 2-3 gallong tank for under $150.

#22 slapshot

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 06:24 AM

I got this from Lowe's for $160.It is a six gal.air compressor that wears more than one hat."car tires ,bike tires,etc etc". Plus you can paint forever without the compressor coming on (which makes me jump ever time).The one that I got from the hobby store runs constantly costs more& has less features.
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#23 Dr. Cranky

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 02:40 AM

I have several airbrushes, all IWATA. My two workhorses are the Eclipse and the Micron C-Plus.

But for many years I got the job done with my Eclipse.

#24 pharr7226

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 07:44 AM

I got this from Lowe's for $160.It is a six gal.air compressor that wears more than one hat."car tires ,bike tires,etc etc". Plus you can paint forever without the compressor coming on (which makes me jump ever time).The one that I got from the hobby store runs constantly costs more& has less features.
Posted Image


That's one nice work area. I'm a novice airbrush user, but I've experimented with 3 different airbrushes. The first was a plastic Aztec, which broke after using it only a few times... I think it was about 5 times. Aztec was very good about repairing it for free. But, I only got two painting sessions out of it before I had to send it back. A lot of people swear by Aztec, but I won't use one again. My second airbrush was an Iwata Elclipse, which DamnCranky and other have praised. I love the Iwata, which is a double action airbrush. It has a gravity feed with a relatively small paint cup. The Iwata atomizes paint better than any of my other airbrushes. It's perfect for painting details and the gravity feed allows you avoid wasting paint that suction type airbrushes waste. But, I found that for spraying large areas, like car bodies the spray pattern was not wide enough for me to get the coverage that I wanted. Also, I had to stop and refill the cup in the middle of painting session due to the cup size while using the Iwata. Please be advised that my issues with the Iwata were operator error. Others have used it to paint bodies with spectacular results. But, I thought that you might like to hear the perspective of an airbrush newbie. I bought a third airbrush with a %40 or %50 off coupon from Hobby Lobby... the single action Badger 350. The Badger is a suction type airbrush, which allows you to used varying sizes of paint bottles. I used the medium and large heads, which give me the wide spray pattern that I sought for spraying bodies. I also find that the wide spray pattern of the Badger makes it easier for me to avoid tiger stripes when spraying metallic paints. I find the precision of the Iwata and the wide spray pattern of the Badger indispensable. If I had to pick one as my first airbrush, I would probably pick the single action Badger. Also, remember that the tool is only as good as the talent of the operator. In other words, whatever you decide to buy... practice, practice, practice. I hope this helps.

Edited by pharr7226, 14 July 2010 - 08:53 AM.


#25 Marc @ MPC Motorsports

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 08:15 AM

I have a really, really nice dual-action Grex. Bought the whole set...compressor, everything. It works great. Would buy one again in an heartbeat.

Truth be told, I have a lot more fun building when it stays in the corner unused. Somehow the airbrush is the line between "fun" and "this feels like work" most of the time. I won't argue it's necessary for a lot of things, and they are a great tool. Somehow, the airbrush trips the taking-this-too-seriously switch for me.

For me once you put away the rattle cans a lot of the fun goes away with them. Can't say why, but it just does. I think so much of the appeal of this is getting away with a kid's hobby as an adult, and I didn't have an airbrush as a kid.

Amen, Brother Mark. ;)

I feel exactly the same way. The only time the airbrush does not seem like work is when I am spraying a color that is not available in rattle can, like Alclad metallizers or that killer HOK color that is not readily available in a rattle can.

What really makes my skin crawl is when I read where someone decants Tamiya or Testors spray lacquers and shoots them thru an airbrush. To each his own, but that really seems like work!

#26 Zoom Zoom

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 08:55 AM

What really makes my skin crawl is when I read where someone decants Tamiya or Testors spray lacquers and shoots them thru an airbrush. To each his own, but that really seems like work!


Don't knock it until you've at least tried it.

Once you've done it a few times, it is so easy even a caveman can do it.

The work is worth it to me. I got by for the longest time with "the Tamiya spray can is good enough" mentality, but with familiarity I can practically dismantle/clean/re-assemble an airbrush blindfolded in about a minute.

The ability to build up in much thinner layers, especially pearl colors and clear, is the biggest benefit. I like sneaking up on clear with the airbrush in thin layers, and one or two wet coats on top of that from the spray can. I mix a little clear with the last coat of color, which lessens any chance of the clear affecting the color...especially metallics and pearls. No more color pulling away from edges, no more inadvertent thin spots. Nice, crisp panel lines/detail remain, never filling the crevices & other finer details. Even Tamiya cans are like spraying paint through a firehose compared to shooting it through an airbrush. I don't like the amount of texture from Tamiya or especially Testors cans when not shooting a wet coat. I'm great at shooting the wettest coats possible our of a spray can w/o running, but the concept of "mist coats" from spray cans is a myth compared to real mist coats when applied from an airbrush. On the odd chance there's a defect in the paint, it's easy to spot repair without the need to repaint everything, or potentially start from scratch.

I also am spending less time at the back end of the paint jobs now, since there's less (often times zero) wetsanding required before hitting it with compound.

I can spray a nice, thin layer of transparent color as a midcoat before clear. Subtlety is the key, I'm not after a candy color. I can mix a couple colors together to make my own shade if there isn't one that's the right match. My cans of paint go remarkably further these days. I can apply what looks like a miles-deep clearcoat on 2-3 bodies from one can of TS-13. An almost-used-up can of clear is perfect for airbrushing the base layer of clear. It's amazing how far it will go when shot like that.

The more familiar you get, the fast it gets, the less like "work" it becomes. Since paint is the biggest thing that meets the eye on a model, I want mine to be as good as possible w/the least effort. I'm getting fantastic results now, totally worth the effort IMHO. Your mileage may vary.

Plumbint/wiring engines & chassis, using photoetch parts, detailing a vintage car with "who knows what quality this stuff will be today" BMF...now that is work B)

#27 Brett Barrow

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 11:03 AM



What really makes my skin crawl is when I read where someone decants Tamiya or Testors spray lacquers and shoots them thru an airbrush. To each his own, but that really seems like work!



Don't knock it until you've at least tried it.


The ability to build up in much thinner layers, especially pearl colors and clear, is the biggest benefit. I like sneaking up on clear with the airbrush in thin layers, and one or two wet coats on top of that from the spray can. I mix a little clear with the last coat of color, which lessens any chance of the clear affecting the color...especially metallics and pearls. No more color pulling away from edges, no more inadvertent thin spots. Nice, crisp panel lines/detail remain, never filling the crevices & other finer details. Even Tamiya cans are like spraying paint through a firehose compared to shooting it through an airbrush. I don't like the amount of texture from Tamiya or especially Testors cans when not shooting a wet coat. I'm great at shooting the wettest coats possible our of a spray can w/o running, but the concept of "mist coats" from spray cans is a myth compared to real mist coats when applied from an airbrush. On the odd chance there's a defect in the paint, it's easy to spot repair without the need to repaint everything, or potentially start from scratch.


(Both quotes edited from original posts)

Totally agree w/ Bob 110%

I've been known to do the "Tamiya Two-Step", which is decanting and airbrushing the first few mist coats until I have solid coverage, then doing the final wet-coats with the spray can.

But since I got an airbrush that can really lay down some nice controllable wet coats (both my Badger Anthem 155 and Iwata Revolution BCS are good for this) I haven't done it for a while. The Tamiya cans tend to give a little orange peel, and you couldn't pay me to get near a model with a Testor's spray can, though I do like their paint, especially the Lacquer line.

Edited by Brett Barrow, 14 July 2010 - 11:04 AM.


#28 Marc @ MPC Motorsports

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 12:03 PM

The more familiar you get, the fast it gets, the less like "work" it becomes. Since paint is the biggest thing that meets the eye on a model, I want mine to be as good as possible w/the least effort. I'm getting fantastic results now, totally worth the effort IMHO. Your mileage may vary.

Plumbint/wiring engines & chassis, using photoetch parts, detailing a vintage car with "who knows what quality this stuff will be today" BMF...now that is work :P

With anything in life, the more familiar you get with something, the faster you can do it and the less like "work" it becomes.

We all have different things in the hobby that we enjoy and some things that we find to be more like work.

#29 Brett Barrow

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 12:09 PM

[img]http://images24.fotki.com/v852/photos/5/47655/8699854/IMG_0581-vi.jpg[/imgx]

Not that an airbrush can't give a wonderful finish, but I always often read about "control" or "paint lays down to thick out of the can" in these threads. I think you can put on too much, or too little paint just as easily with airbrush or can. I would also maintain you have a lot of control there with a spray can in terms of how much paint goes on, and how it looks when you're done. Above is a second mist coat...not the first...shot straight from a Tamiya can.
[img]http://images114.fotki.com/v1606/photos/5/47655/8699854/IMG_0583-vi.jpg[/imgx]
Coat#4...
[img]http://images18.fotki.com/v270/photos/5/47655/8699854/IMG_0585-vi.jpg[/imgx]
Finally coat #7...the first wet coat...all shot within an hour with nothing in-between but time.

I am not suggesting people shouldn't use an airbrush if it's what they're comfortable with, or just like better...by all means do. But I think you can get pretty much the same results (when you're using the same paints) either way for larger jobs like a body or hood.

Obviously for special-mix colors, unusual effects, or trick- shot paintwork too delicate for a can, airbrush is the only way to go.

For what it's worth, I've never had a problem specific to Testors spray cans, myself. I've gotten bad nozzles, but I've had that with all brands at some point. I do agree the "black" nozzles seem to work a little better. I've just found that each can sprays a little different, and you adjust to how the paint flows from it instead of welding yourself to a "I move THIS fast across the surface at EXACTLY 12" and 84-degree angle" technique. It works for me, probably because I couldn't do anything twice the same way if I tried anyhow...


I think climate and location have a lot to do with how spray cans perform, and where I am, those are the results I get, and have gotten for years. Tamiya, out of the can, orange peels a little. Nothing a little 3600 can't fix, but it's there. If I had to live without an airbrush, I could live with Tamiya cans. Testor's cans are just too unpredictable, so I don't bother, always decant and airbrush.

#30 Karmodeler2

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 01:05 PM

Ok bought a Badger 175 Crescendo today at Michaels. Used the 50% off coupon and now looking for a compatible compressor. Any ideas what to look at. My budget will be under $200 range without a coupon.
Drew


If you are using full size guns (your SATA), then why not use it for your model bodies? I do it all the time. I have a Devilbiss GFG 670 that has about a 10-14 inch fan. I use CO2 and I recommend you do the same. I grew up in SC and live in FL now and the weather sucks in the summer for painting. I can paint on any day, any temp, and with CO2 I have no fish eyes or blemishes. Plus, a lot of the tiger stripping and shading you see on full size cars comes from the pulsating compressor as it's running trying to keep up with pressure. You will have no tiger stripes and a constant psi. Another great thing about CO2 is you can throw all the rules about CFM and what the gun needs out the window. I have 1100 PSI pushing 30 constant with no pulsing and no calculation for CFM. It's is WELL WORTH it.
And I use all 4 of my airbrushes on my CO2 tank.
I agree with Bob Downe...buy the best you can afford. I would stay away from Harbor Freight unless you just want a $9 airbrush to learn with.

Bob and I have both taken the Best Paint award at GSL, so we come with experience.

David

#31 Karmodeler2

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 01:15 PM

Amen, Brother Mark. :P
What really makes my skin crawl is when I read where someone decants Tamiya or Testors spray lacquers and shoots them thru an airbrush. To each his own, but that really seems like work!


Hey Marc,
you will find that if you do the two step process, several things will be in your favor, but it's your choice to not try it.
The paint will go MUCH further (I can get two bodies done with one can), the paint will not be a volatile and will cover 4 times better without as much paint. The propellent in Tamiya is very hot (chemically) and this is what causes the paint to not want to adhere to door edges and such.
The airbrush will allow you to control the application very well. I sprayed the stripes on this car using the side cup that came with my Paasche and I only filled it up 1/2 way. I shot 8 coats of blue to get the richness, and when I took the tape off the car, you could barely feel the lip where the blue met the white. When I cleared it (8 coats of Tamiya.....less than 1.2 of the same cup) you could not feel the difference between the blue and the white. That's the control Bob is talking about. You can lay down SUPER THIN coats with incredible coverage if you take it out of the can.
But you make that choice.
David


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#32 Zoom Zoom

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 01:53 PM

Not that an airbrush can't give a wonderful finish, but I always often read about "control" or "paint lays down to thick out of the can" in these threads. I think you can put on too much, or too little paint just as easily with airbrush or can. I would also maintain you have a lot of control there with a spray can in terms of how much paint goes on, and how it looks when you're done. Above is a second mist coat...not the first...shot straight from a Tamiya can.

Finally coat #7...the first wet coat...all shot within an hour with nothing in-between but time.

I am not suggesting people shouldn't use an airbrush if it's what they're comfortable with, or just like better...by all means do. But I think you can get pretty much the same results (when you're using the same paints) either way for larger jobs like a body or hood.


You were honest and up front when you said you avoid the airbrush because it's "too much like work" and not as much fun for you as using spray cans. I totally get that. After that point, though, you're still not selling me, but I'm not here to blow holes in your defense of spray cans vs. airbrushes. I had a lot of fun for a few years when I painted the majority of my model bodies with Tamiya sprays straight from the spray can. I laughed at the irony, since I "wrote the book", but then again I have always been using my airbrush for other parts, so I wasn't saving that much "work". I'm always up for a better/faster/more fun way to get from point A to point B. It was when I started using Cobra Colors paint (making a ton of colors for modern models of modern cars that were right up my alley) that I started using my airbrush again for bodies and not just interior/engine/chassis colors. A desire to get a broader range of colors from my beloved Tamiya spray cans saw me get serious with the decanting. I haven't looked back. Benefits beyond color variations were realized and I'm exploiting them for all they are worth.

I've used airbrushes for so long that they don't intimidate me or make me think that it's too much work to be fun. You may get ~80% as good a result using spray cans for certain colors/finishes vs. an airbrush, but chasing that last ~20% I've personally found more rewarding and fun than a lot of other tasks on models that other people make look easy.

If that Grex outfit is just gathering dust in a corner, just send it this way :D I could trade you a bunch of kits that I thought I wanted 20 years ago that do nothing for me now ;)

With anything in life, the more familiar you get with something, the faster you can do it and the less like "work" it becomes.

We all have different things in the hobby that we enjoy and some things that we find to be more like work.


I couldn't agree with you more!

#33 Monty

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 03:33 PM

I gravitated to airbrushes years ago because I had too many projects ruined by Testors rattle cans. After hours of body prep, I would proceed to get the paint ready (shaking the can, heating it in warm water, etc). Then, depending on the whims of the model gods, the infamous Testors nozzles would do one of the following:

a ) ejaculate viscous globs of paint in a pattern that only Jackson Pollock could appreciate
b ) allow a trickle of runny paint to spurt out 1/2 inch from the can. To get a proper visual of this, imagine trying to stop a bout of dysentery with half a cork.
c ) spray paint in a usable manner. I can't recall if this ever actually happened on one of my projects, but a few of my friends say they had some success, and they don't lie very often.

That said, I couldn't seem to manage varying the pressure on rattle cans. To me, they were the virtual equivalent of trying to sketch with a log. I'll take the extra effort of the airbrush any day.

Edited by Monty, 14 July 2010 - 04:36 PM.


#34 Steve Keck

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 05:28 PM

Mark to Bob Downie:

"Then again...if they just bought your book, they'd be ahead of the curve, right?"


Book? What Book? I want that book? I need that book!

#35 Steve Keck

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 06:00 PM

Don't knock (decanting) it until you've at least tried it.

Once you've done it a few times, it is so easy even a caveman can do it.

The work is worth it to me. I got by for the longest time with "the Tamiya spray can is good enough" mentality, but with familiarity I can practically dismantle/clean/re-assemble an airbrush blindfolded in about a minute.

About the only thing I can add here that hasn't been said is how this caveman decants Tamiya paints. And giving credit where it's due I got this from ScaleMaster who has been known to be capable of painting.
To decant Tamiya directly into the airbrush cup force a two inch section of aquarium 1/8 inch air line over the blue nipple (I hope this doesn't get me banned) on the nozzle. Shoot directly into the cup. The paint will start to boil over. Insert the end of the tubing into the paint and this should stop the boil. I don't wait more than 15-30 seconds before spraying.

Bob, I had to laugh at your "blindfolded in about a minute" comment. Whenever I dismantle my Tamiya I have to act like it's micro-surgery in a clean room because of those small parts.

And, I still want your book!

#36 Karmodeler2

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 06:14 PM

And, I still want your book!



Here you go. I thought you knew we had a celebrity among us!!!!

http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/0890242879

David

#37 PatRedmond

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 12:53 AM

Iwata Single action

#38 DRG

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 02:05 AM

I have never used an Air Brish and was wanting to try it out.
I went to Harbor Frieght and bought compressor and Air brush for 98.00 yesterday.
If I don't like it then not that much lost.
If I do like Air brushing then I will buy a better set up and use this one for priming.

#39 cazxr2

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 10:28 AM

Oops

Edited by cazxr2, 15 July 2010 - 11:00 AM.


#40 cazxr2

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 10:54 AM

I'm certainly not going to argue with your results, or your technique-that'd be the height of foolishness. You don't need me to tell you that your paint is beyond reproach. Up the thread, though, you mention your final coats...the last of the last...come out of the spray can most of the time. While I'm a firm believer that the top coats are really a magnifying glass over what's underneath them, I think the fact that you're willing to cast the final fate (save polishing) of the model's topcoats "to the can" speaks to how well paint can go on that way.

Plus, I think that most people would be THRILLED to get an "80% as good (as Bob Downie can paint)" finish on their models like you used to before decanting the sprays! You don't need an airbrush for that...though it's always an option.

Kinda like a digital camera...until you max out what you can do with your old one, you don't need a state of the art new one to take pictures of model cars. Once you have gone as far as you can, and you want more...then it's time to think about upgrading.

I only mention this because I see a lot of people spending big bucks on tools that will give disappointing results until the master the prep basics to make that extra investment worthwhile. Then again...if they just bought your book, they'd be ahead of the curve, right?:P

After Reading this post mark I got to say uv hit it on the nail. I myself am a total beginer. And was thinking do I go for air brush???? Or stick with cans???? And I think ur right untill I master the cans I think al stick with them save my cash till I'm getting as good a result with them before I leap. Walk before u can run as they say. This thread has been a huge help. Thanks to everybody