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9/11 Coke display in Walmart: just about as wrong as you can get


Ace-Garageguy
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The most offensive part is that the display is being used to sell something. well this year is the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor. What tacky sales promotions can they they come up for that?

This, this right here, Pearl Harbor would be bad enough 75 years later, but in an incident that was this soon and took even more lives was just in horribly bad taste. The death threats against the owner and his employees are equally horrible (makes me wonder if they would be safer on the West Side of Chicago at the moment), as would any attack that might happen to the building the business is in (especially if they're in a strip mall and not a stand alone building!)  I really don't feel sorry for the owner, to be honest,  who very well may have thought this was a good idea to make and air the ad.

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The most offensive part is that the display is being used to sell something. well this year is the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor. What tacky sales promotions can they they come up for that?

Well, so far I can think of two major motion pictures, both of which I'm sure will be re-shown and heavily promoted on cable TV.

Also, just to get darn close to on-topic, I've seen a bunch of Pearl Harbor "special edition" model airplanes over the years, including P-36, P-40, and A6M2, and I'm sure there have been others. Probably ships, too.

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The most offensive part is that the display is being used to sell something. well this year is the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor. What tacky sales promotions can they they come up for that?

Well, so far I can think of two major motion pictures, both of which I'm sure will be re-shown and heavily promoted on cable TV.

Also, just to get darn close to on-topic, I've seen a bunch of Pearl Harbor "special edition" model airplanes over the years, including P-36, P-40, and A6M2, and I'm sure there have been others. Probably ships, too.

I see quite a difference in promoting a film made about Pearl Harbor, or models apparently depicting military aircraft as they would have appeared during the attack, and using the incident to get attention for or advertise products like soft drinks and mattresses.

Kinda like having an August 6 promotion on Hiroshima Special-Edition Glow in the Dark Swatches.  Image result for hiroshima bombing facts

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I see quite a difference in promoting a film made about Pearl Harbor, or models apparently depicting military aircraft as they would have appeared during the attack, and using the incident to get attention for or advertise products like soft drinks and mattresses.

Kinda like having an August 6 promotion on Hiroshima Special-Edition Glow in the Dark Swatches.  

Ah, but the post I reacted to mentioned Pearl Harbor being used as a "sales promotion" to move product. Which is exactly what those "Pearl Harbor Edition" kits do.

Believe it or not, I once saw a local TV commercial for some store having a "Martin Luther King Day White Sale." It only aired once, but really, how many people had to be asleep at the switch or completely clueless for it to have gotten written, produced, and aired even once? :o

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The most offensive part is that the display is being used to sell something. well this year is the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor. What tacky sales promotions can they they come up for that?

As pro-1A as I am, I have sometimes wondered- very seriously, if we shouldn't pass a law that restricts the use of sales promotions for national holidays, and outright ban it on what should properly be national days of mourning, including Sept. 11, Dec. 7, and any day on which a sitting President was assassinated. We can probably throw in a few more, too.

I'm all about making a buck and saying what you want- providing you make that buck honestly and honorably, and what you say is accurate. With those activities should come discretion and common sense.

My favorite example of "you've GOT to be kidding me" marketing stupidity was hours after April 15, 2013, when the City of Boston was deliberately and most sinisterly attacked by the Tsarnaev brothers. 

Some recipe website sent out a tweet saying "our hearts go out to Boston. Here's a recipe for cranberries!"

REALLY?

I don't recall who did it, but they got their heads handed to them by the City of Boston, those of us who live in Massachusetts, and a whole bunch of other people. 

In society, we often remark about tone-deafness over one thing or another, and I think, sadly, that far too much of that occurs in advertising and marketing.

Charlie Larkin

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iraq war civilian casualties - 155, 000 - 174,000

 

Well, at least that number is down from the outrageous "one million" bandied about for years.:rolleyes:

Still...even 155K far exceeds the civilian death tolls from Hiroshima, or Nagasaki, or the fire-bombings of Tokyo, Dresden, or Hamburg, or the bombing and subsequent battle of Berlin. And in all those cases, the combatants were trying to kill civilians.

What's the real number, or a realistic number? I don't know. I just know that the figures thrown out seem unusually high in a historical context.

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SOURCE:   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_troll

In Internet slang, a troll (/ˈtrl//ˈtrɒl/) is a person who sows discord on the Internet by starting arguments or upsetting people, by posting inflammatory,[1] extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community (such as a newsgroup, forum, chat room, or blog) with the deliberate intent of provoking readers into an emotional response[2] or of otherwise disrupting normal on-topic discussion,[3] often for their own amusement.

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