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GMC V-6 engines sought


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I am hoping (patiently) for Rookie Resins to reopen, but if not, I am wondering, you know how GM made a small V-6 for some of their trucks, well does anyone know of some 1/16 scale S-10 vehicle models (or something similar) that had a V-6, then would seem about the correct size when used in a truck at 1/25 scale?

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On 11/27/2022 at 2:52 PM, AlbertS said:

I am hoping (patiently) for Rookie Resins to reopen, but if not, I am wondering, you know how GM made a small V-6 for some of their trucks, well does anyone know of some 1/16 scale S-10 vehicle models (or something similar) that had a V-6, then would seem about the correct size when used in a truck at 1/25 scale?

What year range, and truck size do you want. The S-10 kits do have sixes but those are small trucks.

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You mention Rookie Resins, @AlbertSso I can imagine that you're referring to the GMC "big block" V6 series (305-351, et seq.) of 1968 & earlier.

There aren't any kit offerings of the big Jimmy six other than the Rookie offering. I, too, was under the impression that the Chevrolet 'W' Engine (348/409) would be a good start but I was informed that the GMC big six actually dwarfs the Chevy W! 

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The GMC V6 is a heavy slug of cast iron.  A couple of Sixties car magazines ran articles on swapping them out for Cadillac V8 engines.  Less weight over the front axle, and better fuel economy with the Cad.  

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On 11/30/2022 at 10:36 AM, MeatMan said:

What year range, and truck size do you want. The S-10 kits do have sixes but those are small trucks.

I am looking to build several GMC 1/25th scale farm trucks, as from my youth, that mid 60's range engine, which had the same block but were drilled out to be 301,351,401 cubes.  

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On 11/30/2022 at 12:32 PM, Mark said:

The GMC V6 is a heavy slug of cast iron.  A couple of Sixties car magazines ran articles on swapping them out for Cadillac V8 engines.  Less weight over the front axle, and better fuel economy with the Cad.  

All I know is we were farmers, with several straight dump trucks hauling lots of grain around.  Specifically, side by side, had both a Ford and a GMC, both with 401 engines, and the GMC would out pull the Ford.  My thoughts are even though the same size in terms of cubic inches, because the volume was spread out over more cylinder's, the V8 Ford did not quite pull like the V6 GMC.  Thanks for your response, and don't get offended by my next sentence, but, I am sure the "car" mag only cared about 1/4 track times, not day-to-day work and results.

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On 11/30/2022 at 8:41 AM, Plowboy said:

Grab a 409 and start cutting. That or contact someone that does 3-D printing.

Thanks, I did that, months ago, got a response of "...too much work, someone has to check it...", after ironically, they were seeking 3-D print ideas. 

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The Mount’n Goat V6 is pretty tiny. You might be better off starting with a 409.  The V8 from the Crew Chief Blazer is kind of a big mis-shapen thing that could be shortened up. It likely has the transmission that you would need also.

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On 12/2/2022 at 7:43 AM, AlbertS said:

Thanks, I did that, months ago, got a response of "...too much work, someone has to check it...", after ironically, they were seeking 3-D print ideas. 

There is an issue with 3D printing. Everyone wants an "Accurate" version of whatever engine they seek, however finding accurate dimensions and drawing of these engines is sometimes not possible. 

I have drawn engines from original blueprints. This allows me to ensure that the engine is accurate and to scale. However when those do not exist, where do you even start? I have done a lot of searching and I can find a million pictures of the GMC V6, but nothing other than some dimensions that are based off of vague reference points. They will say it 28.5in long, but from what to what?

If someone can find me a blueprint type drawing of a GMC V6, or any other engine you want for that matter, I would be happy to draw it up. But, without it, the best I can do is wild guesses from internet pictures. 

I am working on a Ford inline 6 right now that has me stumped for this very reason. Then I look for pictures of it and the pictures all vary and do not differentiate between different years, bores, etc. 

Without accurate drawing, the engine will look only vaguely like the engine it is supposed to be, and likely not much better than the plastic lump that came in the kit. 

So, the issue is not lack of interest in doing the job, but lack of technical data to do the job in a way that people would actually want to buy it.   

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Which Ford straight six?  The two "classic" Sixties/Seventies engines (144-250, and 240-300) have both been done in plastic.  That would leave the later fuel-injected version of the truck 300, the first overhead valve six, and the 1941-51 flathead six.

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