Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

How to judge car models?


Recommended Posts

I've never entered a contest, but seeing the incredible 3D printed engine by Mad Mike in Under Glass (do take a look) made me think that if products like this become available, how can a contest judge make valid comparisons except in box stock classes?  Of course, even there you could have people getting someone else to paint their model, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As you say, some people already enter ringers, or have others do significant parts of the work. It's not everywhere, but it does occasionally happen.

That said, just because someone can buy beautifully accurate and highly-detailed parts is no guarantee that the rest of the model will be up to show-winning standards.

And it's possible to approach that level of detail with some of the best of the best resin aftermarket parts anyway (or highly-skilled scratch-building) and has been for rather a long time.

I don't know about these days, but back in the '50s and '60s, the NMRA (National Model Railroad Association) had categories for models built from kits, scratch-built, etc. They tended to keep models built at differing skill levels competing with each other, rather than having the wizard old-timers competing with the less experienced.

More categories for car-models, that removed those that were heavily-reliant on high-end aftermarket parts, might be a solution...but competition is never really "fair".

Real cars built to the level it takes to compete for America's Most Beautiful Roadster, for instance, would put to shame just about everything at the local cruise-night shows.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, GerN said:

I've never entered a contest, but seeing the incredible 3D printed engine by Mad Mike in Under Glass (do take a look) made me think that if products like this become available, how can a contest judge make valid comparisons except in box stock classes?  Of course, even there you could have people getting someone else to paint their model, etc.

You can make the same argument for aftermarket photoetch and resin.  I suppose you could just document the changes so the judges know what you did.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

As you say, some people already enter ringers, or have others do significant parts of the work. It's not everywhere, but it does occasionally happen.

That said, just because someone can buy beautifully accurate and highly-detailed parts is no guarantee that the rest of the model will be up to show-winning standards.

And it's possible to approach that level of detail with some of the best of the best resin aftermarket parts anyway (or highly-skilled scratch-building) and has been for rather a long time.

I don't know about these days, but back in the '50s and '60s, the NMRA (National Model Railroad Association) had categories for models built from kits, scratch-built, etc. They tended to keep models built at differing skill levels competing with each other, rather than having the wizard old-timers competing with the less experienced.

More categories for car-models, that removed those that were heavily-reliant on high-end aftermarket parts, might be a solution...but competition is never really "fair".

Real cars built to the level it takes to compete for America's Most Beautiful Roadster, for instance, would put to shame just about everything at the local cruise-night shows.

Agreed!,  another example would be; someone could have the best polished finish on his/her model, but the detail and assembly of it could still be rubbish in comparison.....happens ALL the time. Its like in bodybuilding, you may have the biggest/best developed upper body, but if you have "Tinkerbell" legs, you will get your ass beat by the guy whose smaller, less developed, but MORE symmetrical than you. Symmetry, and balance of modeling skills should be the winner every time, but is not always the case unfortunately.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you judging the finished model, or the modelers ability?

 

Model "A" is just about flawless, but all parts are purchased, and model "B" is a little less flawless, but a lot of the parts are scratchbuilt.

If you are judging just the finished model, "A" should win, if you are judging on the work it took to produce, then model "B" should win.

 

Of course this is just my opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's all perception, what the eye sees. Unless it's box stock anything goes with a few exceptions I.E. pre painted bodies. 

And again it's up to those that set up the contest as to the rules they will follow.

Mad Mike's  http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/topic/129752-124-ford-gt40-mk1-engine-3d-printed-by-myself/ engine is quite impressive to say the least, but as Ace pointed out, it all depends what one will do with it. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most contest rules state that the model entry must be the sole work of the entrant (accepting that there may be exceptions for parts not included in the kit), I'm sure that most of us that have attended/entered contests have seen at least one model entry that seems to defy that rule.

It's not fair in most cases, but some people feel that they need a trophy not matter the cost in honor or achievement.

Contest judges are supposed to judge the entry, not the builder.

I have always judged that way when I was working contests, it helps to have the builders name hidden during judging but an impartial judge would not need that.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You judge workmanship. Period. I don't care where the parts come from or how they are produced. Resin and aluminum parts are already giving those with the financial wherewithal a step up on detail, but they still get beat at contest.  It's how the builder preps, paints and assembles that wins awards. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Jantrix said:

You judge workmanship. Period. I don't care where the parts come from or how they are produced. Resin and aluminum parts are already giving those with the financial wherewithal a step up on detail, but they still get beat at contest.  It's how the builder preps, paints and assembles that wins awards. 

 

Agreed!!!!   -You can have the best rifle in the world, but if your breathing, heart beat, and trigger finger aren't in sync, you wont hit BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH.

Edited by Dann Tier
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...