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Floor carpet


Beans
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Found a new way to carpet the floor.  Never used flocking so can't compare but so far I like the way mine are turning out.

What I have done is take one of those dryer sheets from doing laundry, cut it to shape and coat one side with spay glue. 

Press it into place.  Be careful though as the spray glue will saturate and make it sticky on top as well.

Then after it dries, it can be painted.  

I'll try to get some pictures of how it looks.

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There is a product available at many craft stores and on line called "embossing powder" that has become the cutting edge for carpet Joseph.

Do a little looking around on the forum and you will find that it has become a very popular option, and for good reason.

Give it a look see. ^_^

 

image.jpeg.3ef817beb6571e5db103db0ce1a0ea93.jpeg

 

 

 

 

Steve

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That looks great!  I am going to have to research that.  I actually think I have some embossing powder in the house. 

 

That is what comes from so much hobby jumping.

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The embossing powder seems to be similar to flocking in its application.

Another product that can be used as scale carpeting is the self adhesive vinyl sheet made for covering card tables. The range of colours is limited though, generally green, red or beige. I guess that it could be sprayed another colour before application. It is ok for flat areas like a floor, but no good for compound curves. The embossing and clock would be better for that.

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8 hours ago, Bugatti Fan said:

Re my last entry     clock should read Flock!

 Nothing like spellcheck! I wind up going back and fixing a lot of my posts, mostly from phone posts.

The other day I was posting about my Jeepster and i typed as far as Je.. and it gave me choices of Jesus or Jews!

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Here is an update on my dryer sheet as carpet experimentation. 

I have attached the most recent examples.  The closer up one shows it glued in place but not trimmed or painted.  The other picture is after painting.

You can see the difference in the "carpeted" sections and the center area where the seats will go.

I will post another picture once I get the center console and front seats in.

IMG_20200722_091741.jpg

IMG_20200721_234140.jpg

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There was a recent thread about using dryer sheets to represent inner surface of fiberglass panels.  That's what your carpet looks like to me.

Why reinvent the proverbial wheel when either flocking or embossing powders produce super-realistic results?  Plus I suspect that dryer sheet method is more labor-intensive, and messier to deal with than the other methods I mentioned.

Edited by peteski
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They guy posted about another method for carpet, let him share what he has. I keep watching threads turn to BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH because people think they need to do things their way iinstead. I have some sheets saved where I was gonna use as under hood insulation an now I can see what the look would be. If you don't like this as a carpet then keep it to yourself, none of it looks like real carpet. I used tissue paper when I was starting out, think it would have worked if I didn't glue it down with tube glue. 

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On ‎7‎/‎23‎/‎2020 at 1:21 AM, peteski said:

There was a recent thread about using dryer sheets to represent inner surface of fiberglass panels.  That's what your carpet looks like to me.

Why reinvent the proverbial wheel when either flocking or embossing powders produce super-realistic results?  Plus I suspect that dryer sheet method is more labor-intensive, and messier to deal with than the other methods I mentioned.

Because without experimentation and innovation you wouldn't have had a wheel to begin with and I don't mind getting my hands dirty.

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On ‎7‎/‎23‎/‎2020 at 7:48 AM, Tom Geiger said:

I’d be concerned about long term stability of dryer sheets since they are full of chemicals 

As opposed to paint, or glue.  HAHAHAHA.  (laughter means sarcasm was meant humorously)

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On 7/24/2020 at 7:03 PM, Beans said:

As opposed to paint, or glue.  HAHAHAHA.  (laughter means sarcasm was meant humorously)

I’d be most concerned about the chemicals in the sheet doing something odd to the paint that you’ve applied over them further down the line - there’s a bunch of weird chemicals in a drier sheet and it might end up causing weird effects further down the line.

That said, it’s a free country!

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22 minutes ago, CabDriver said:

I’d be most concerned about the chemicals in the sheet doing something odd to the paint that you’ve applied over them further down the line - there’s a bunch of weird chemicals in a drier sheet and it might end up causing weird effects further down the line.

That said, it’s a free country!

I have to agree.

After all, a dryer sheet is supposed to be a fabric softener.

 

If it helps, these are the ingredients of a standard Bounce dryer sheet.

 

Dipalmethyl Hydroxyethylammoinum Methosulfate. (say that 5 times fast!)

Fatty Acid

Polyester Substrate

Clay

Fragrance

 

 

 

 

 

Steve

 

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3 minutes ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

Dipalmethyl Hydroxyethylammoinum Methosulfate. (say that 5 times fast!)

Fatty Acid

Polyester Substrate

Clay

Fragrance

I believe those are also the ingredients for a 7-Eleven hot dog ? 

Edited by CabDriver
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15 hours ago, CabDriver said:

I believe those are also the ingredients for a 7-Eleven hot dog ? 

Not sure about the hot dog, but I'm pretty sure that's the exact recipe for the filling in Ho-Hos.

 

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On 7/24/2020 at 7:02 PM, Beans said:

Because without experimentation and innovation you wouldn't have had a wheel to begin with and I don't mind getting my hands dirty.

That's great, however, it would have been better to experiment on scrap parts first to see see if there would be any reactions between dryer sheets, glue, and paints. 

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