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Mack Truck question


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I know that the Mack D trucks had the offset cab for visibility, the DM trucks had the metal front ends, not the fiberglass hoods. The R had the regular centered cab and fiberglass frontends. Other than the offset the D and the R cab look about the same styling. 

Did Mack ever off an R Cab with the DM style metal fronts? Speaking in 1/25 scale, would the DM-800 front fit an R cab even if the factory never did it?

Sometimes I think crazy things while alone in a hotel room. 

EDIT:

I went back and did a deeper Google search and found that they did in fact make a steel hood R truck. So, the question still remains, can a hood from the AMT DM-800 fit a R685ST truck to make a R Steel hood like in the picture? In other words, kit bash without the need for a resin body.

I see AITM sells a R-800 RSX resin kit. 

Mack letter designators confuse me a little, makes it hard to look up what I want. 

 

8969509432_7016da5560_b.jpg

ck153mackr800demo-1.jpg

Edited by Oldmopars
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Here’s one of Dave’s (AITM) he used his flat back cab. The flat Back was made from late 1965-73. They add 3” to the back of the cab in 73. I’m not sure what your asking are you building a Mack DM600 short steel hood? If so I would buy one from Gary Wallace. He sells the hood only and use the new AMT/ MPC Mack DM600 or DM800. Yes you can take a MPC Mack DM800 and Married it up with a AMT Mack R model cab.  You will have to Re-Fab the top of the hood and make the back of the fenders If you want I can take some pics of the one I got from Dave. Hope this helps 

95F0FE77-70E3-4FFB-A2EC-52973DA0DB13.jpeg

Edited by Pete68
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Well, at this point I’m not sure what I want to do. I have an R kit, but somehow it is just not inspiring me. I was just trying to think a bit outside the box. 
It’s not like I have a lack of kits to do, I have a few years worth. (Like 10 years) I may go with my original thought and get the newer style RD hood from Gary and put a dump box on it. 

Edited by Oldmopars
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49 minutes ago, Oldmopars said:

Well, at this point I’m not sure what I want to do. I have an R kit, but somehow it is just not inspiring me. I was just trying to think a bit outside the box. 
It’s not like I have a lack of kits to do, I have a few years worth. (Like 10 years) I may go with my original thought and get the newer style RD hood from Gary and put a dump box on it. 

That RD with a dump bed would look good especially the Autocar bed very east coast look 

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The DM-800 kit hood seems really long. It seems to have a strange axle possition also. 

I may have to get a DM-800 kit and see if I can shorten the frenders. Making a new hood to fit would be easy as it is just flat. Could be bent out of some brass or aluminum.

Wile I want to support our aftermrket venders, I think this route would be cheaper and allow me to avoid using resin and have a lot of leftover parts. 

The more I think about this, the more I want to do it. 

Mack DM800 Build 47.jpg

Edited by Oldmopars
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OK, so here are some pictures of I think where I want to go with this. Shortened DM-800 Hood, DM-800 chassis, R685ST cab, Autocar dump box. Possible larger heavy resin wheel/tire combo. 

Pictures are mostly more my inspiration. 

i306403.jpg

rd_steel_hood_4790.jpg

rd_steel_hood_4798.jpg

rd_steel_hood_4795.jpg

13127177384_6ddbb828e4_b.jpg

795c6c8669c9a91fa8a4187079a27d8e.jpg

rd_steel_hood_4794.jpg

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If I am not mistaken the RD600 is shorter hood, but I think that the RD800 has the long hood like the DM800. Either of them will be a cool build. I have one of Gary’s steel hoods for the DM600 that I hope to build one day. Looking forward to what you come up with!

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I'd like to just toss out some quick info I've been meaning to share about Mack model designations, but I haven't had a chance to login here and reply since I got a new laptop.

To clarify, there is no Mack "D" model, they are all "DM" Supposedly it stands for "Dump-Mixer" as they're the primary vocations that these were aimed at. They could be had as tractors too, in addition to being commonly seen as garbage trucks, roll-offs, and every other vocational truck out there. Mack did offer a lighter duty version with the offset cab called the "U" model. Typically they were tractors and lighter specs all around where the DM was almost exclusively heavy spec. The option of fiberglass or steel hoods were just that, options. The DM600 could be had with either, but the DM800 was exclusively steel. The same thing applies to the R series. Fiberglass/steel on R400 and R600 series, R700 was exclusively fiberglass, and the RD800 is steel. The addition of the D into the R model designation simply designates it as a heavy duty R model. 

Here's a handy (but by no means complete) guide to how the Mack model nomenclature works:

  • Chassis numbers (GVW Rating):
    • 4xx -
    • 6xx -
    • 7xx -
    • 8xx -

Note: the xx is the place holder for the engine code. 

Examples

R607 END673

R609 END711

R611 ENDT673C

R612 ETAZ673 (300+)

R615 END864 V8

R626 6v92 Detroit

R685 ENDT675 (237 Maxidyne)

R686 ENDT676 (300 Maxidyne)

R688 E6350

R719 ENDT864 V6

R795 ENDT865 V8

R797 ENDT866 V8

R747 290 Cummins

R763 335 Cummins

R767 350 Cummins

  •  
    • T - Tractor
    • S - Six wheel chassis
    • L - Light weight components
  •  
  • RS7xxLS as our example:
    • R = R model

      S = an S after the R indicates it has a steel frame. This was a western Hayward thing i believe.

      7 = has to do with the chassis GW rating. 800/900 series were extra and super heavy duty chassis.

      XX = these two numbers are engine codes.

      L = Hayward models had this letter to denote the cab used light weight components like aluminum doors.

      S = six wheel tandem chassis. so essentially it is a 6x4 chassis.

      Another example RW613:

      The W stands for Western and together with the R means a superliner or RW. 13 is a Cummins NTC engine.

      If there is an SX after the number code like R600SX it means you have a heavy duty tandem

      X - Extreme duty

 

So, to use an example of one in plastic, the AMT R685ST translates to an R600 series, with the 237hp Maxidyne engine, in 6 wheel tractor chassis. The AMT(Ex MPC) DM-800 actually depicts a DM-895SX with it's ENDT-865 V8 turbo diesel and 55,000 lb rear axles. the DM-600 I believe uses the same rear suspension (I've never built one) which makes it a DM-607SX, as I believe it has a ENDT-673. Another interesting note is the engine designators. EN simply means engine. The D was added when Mack began to produce diesels to distinguish them from their gasoline counterparts. T means its turbocharged. The last 3 digits are the model designator. Once Mack phased out everything that wasn't a turbo diesel, the engine models I believe simpy became the "E" series. 

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