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Car kits, or kit cars... big models?


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If I were to build a Factory Five Cobra replica, would I be able to enter the finished replica in a model car contest? It was in kit form and it's not the real thing, but a replica (albeit full-size). There would probably be discrepancies when compared to the actual Shelby-built Cobra, much like those in many kits that are in production today.

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It gets really weird when the scale kit is a replica of a 1:1 kit car replica, like the Miami Vice Ferrari spider (replica body on a Corvette, as most everyone knows) and the Hardcastle & McCormick McLaren, or the larger scale models like the 1966 Alfa Romeo Zagato replica and Brooks Stevens Excalibur SS cars. Most of them lack truly authentic lines, and most replicars aren't worth talking about.

I don't have the energy to start a new subject with illustrations about some really nicely done modern replicars that have been available over recent years on a production basis, most of them with fiberglass bodies, providing all the style with contemporary underpinnings, but they would include:

• Beck Porsche 550 Spyder (and others)

• Beck Porsche 356 C cabriolet (and others)

• 8/10 scale Auburn Speedster

• 8/10 scale Glenn Pray Cord 810 Sportsman

• Ferrari California Spider roadster (Ferris Bueller)

• Ostermeier Mercedes 300 SL Gullwing

• Talbot-Lago teardrop coupe

• Koux Bugatti Atlantics

• Mercedes 540K Marlene roadster

...and the most accurate of all:

• Suffolk Jaguar SS 100

Not to mention the endless Cobras.

Edited by sjordan2
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A couple of years ago, I discovered a TV show on cable TV BBC channel called "James May's Toy Stories".

Those of you who are car nuts, and machinery nuts in general, would probably like this show.

Anyway, in one episode, he sets out to build the world's largest model airplane (a WWII "Spitfire", I think).

He manages to find a manufacturer that can mold the parts in 1:1 size, and even has the parts on a sprue!

He recruits local high school kids to help assemble it!

I cannot provide a good enough description to do it justice, but it's quite funny. I highly recommend it if you can get the BBC channel on your telly, and can catch a repeat of the episode.

The question remains, is it a model, or a full-scale replica?

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A couple of years ago, I discovered a TV show on cable TV BBC channel called "James May's Toy Stories".

Those of you who are car nuts, and machinery nuts in general, would probably like this show.

Anyway, in one episode, he sets out to build the world's largest model airplane (a WWII "Spitfire", I think).

He manages to find a manufacturer that can mold the parts in 1:1 size, and even has the parts on a sprue!

He recruits local high school kids to help assemble it!

I cannot provide a good enough description to do it justice, but it's quite funny. I highly recommend it if you can get the BBC channel on your telly, and can catch a repeat of the episode.

The question remains, is it a model, or a full-scale replica?

You can find this program on You Tube. The whole series that James May did is there as well. As for the Spitfire he built being the worlds largest model kit, I believe that the Avro Arrow built in Toronto at the Downsview Park Canadian Air and Space Museum held the record for that. But I could be wrong about that point.

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Harry,

Don't forget: Back in the days when Detroit styling departments were creating 1:1 scale mockups of proposed new bodies, they WERE termed "Clay Models".

Methinks that about the only difference between a scaled down model car (quite often termed "replica's--as in "replica stock") and a life sized "model" (of course done for evaluation of a particular styling) isn't all that different: It's simply a matter of scale, IMO.

Art

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Well, I did a little research of definitions. For "model": the words "usually miniature" or "typically on a smaller scale than the original" can be found; for "replica": "especially on a smaller scale" is given. None of those adverbs mean "always", so I'm gonna think that it's in the eye of the beholder. I'd like to see the reactions of judges in this situation.

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"Wrought iron or wooden porches" :huh: . Not to argue, but I'm not sure I understand the correlation or comparison here :blink:.

"Wrought iron or wooden porches" :huh: . Not to argue, but I'm not sure I understand the correlation or comparison here :blink:.

The question was whether a depiction of a non-original car could be called a model if it's in 1:1 scale (BTW, these are Mercedes Gullwings). Just funnin', as was Art when he mentioned the 1:1 clay models used by the car company stylists.

Edited by sjordan2
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