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Why is my clear coat coming out textured?


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Best advice that I can give is to not spend to much time hanging around on, or taking much advice from, many of the people in the Facebook modeling groups.

They'll be trying to convince you to use latex house paint before you know it! :D

 

Some of the best modelers in the country, and the world, are members of this group.

They are going to do their level best try to give you the absolute best advice possible without all of the background noise from the chimps in the cheap seats.  ;)

 

 

 

 

Steve

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1 hour ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

Best advice that I can give is to not spend to much time hanging around on, or taking much advice from, many of the people in the Facebook modeling groups.

They'll be trying to convince you to use latex house paint before you know it! :D

 

Some of the best modelers in the country, and the world, are members of this group.

They are going to do their level best try to give you the absolute best advice possible without all of the background noise from the chimps in the cheap seats.  ;)

 

 

 

 

Steve

I hear that if you thin Behr Premium Plus with kerosene and cat pee you get a really amazing finish, but only if you set the airbrush at 120psi.

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12 hours ago, R. Thorne said:

Please use modeling specific types of paint (Tamiya has the best spray can nozzle ).  Your dunk tank will thank you.

Exactly.

Besides for most bench time is limited. Why would you want to waste your time having to strip a bad paint job? And even if you invest a lot of time getting Rustoleum and other cheap paints to work you will be back to square one when they change their paint formulation. In addition Rustoleum is notorious for going on  thick which will obscure detail and not drying.  I just can't see how it is worthwhile using an inferior paint to save a little bit of money in the long run.

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11 hours ago, bobthehobbyguy said:

Exactly.

Besides for most bench time is limited. Why would you want to waste your time having to strip a bad paint job? And even if you invest a lot of time getting Rustoleum and other cheap paints to work you will be back to square one when they change their paint formulation. In addition Rustoleum is notorious for going on  thick which will obscure detail and not drying.  I just can't see how it is worthwhile using an inferior paint to save a little bit of money in the long run.

Another issue with Rustoleum that I see frequently, (on the Facebook groups) is clogging nozzles.

I've seen this problem first hand.

 

I've also seen people get really excited when they contact Rustoleum to complain about clogged nozzles, and are sent a whole bag of replacements. :rolleyes:

You would think that this might be another clue that even Rustoleum knows what kind off product they're producing.

 

 

 

Steve

Edited by StevenGuthmiller
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Ive decanted Rustoleum 2x , thinned it with lacquer thinner and airbrushed it over Stynylrez primer/sealer and it's turned out awesome. There are a few good colors or some basic colors mixed with their white that makes for some good classic car pastel colors. After thinning and airbrushing it comes out as nice as any model enamels do.

The key to my statement above is " I've " past tense. With the advent of paints like Tamiya LP lacquers it's just less work and faster dry time to use those, with even nicer results. Those I've shot to bare plastic for small stuff or over Mr Surfacer otherwise.

I already posted my sentiment on primers in another post, so I'm not going there. By the way, is the OP poster still in this thread or are we just conversing with one another here, minus him ?.

Edited by Dave G.
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13 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

And don’t forget the 16 hour, 53 minute and 29 second re-coat window. 🙄

 

 

 

Steve

The old Hobby Heaven board was rife with disinformation and bourbon-legends regarding painting. My last visit there was like 15 years ago. 

Another hobby paint that sprays well from a can is the Model Master Extreme Lacquers. Their clear is also quite good. I have 3 or 4 airbrushes. I'm lazy and have a lack of space to contend with. So cans it is.

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2 hours ago, bobss396 said:

The old Hobby Heaven board was rife with disinformation and bourbon-legends regarding painting. My last visit there was like 15 years ago. 

Another hobby paint that sprays well from a can is the Model Master Extreme Lacquers. Their clear is also quite good. I have 3 or 4 airbrushes. I'm lazy and have a lack of space to contend with. So cans it is.

I use a lot of rattle cans as well.

 

I use Duplicolor sandable primers of all colors, Duplicolor primer/sealer, and Duplicolor "Perfect Match" lacquer clear top coat.

I use my airbrush for most colors, especially metallic colors, using MCW or Scale Finishes paints for most everything, but I will still use Duplicolor rattle cans for some solid colors.

I also use some Testors clear gloss and flat lacquers, mostly for smaller parts, and occasionally some of their lacquer primer. 

 

I have also been using some Rustoleum paints for chassis parts, etc, but I buy the stuff in the small cans and thin them for airbrush with lacquer thinner.

As far as I'm concerned, Rustoleum is just another enamel paint, and I'll even thin the stuff in the cans a little with mineral spirits for brush painting, but it's very slow drying, and it's my opinion that the Rustoleum spray cans are virtually unusable.

 

 

 

Steve

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20 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

I use a lot of rattle cans as well.

 

I use Duplicolor sandable primers of all colors, Duplicolor primer/sealer, and Duplicolor "Perfect Match" lacquer clear top coat.

I use my airbrush for most colors, especially metallic colors, using MCW or Scale Finishes paints for most everything, but I will still use Duplicolor rattle cans for some solid colors.

I also use some Testors clear gloss and flat lacquers, mostly for smaller parts, and occasionally some of their lacquer primer. 

 

I have also been using some Rustoleum paints for chassis parts, etc, but I buy the stuff in the small cans and thin them for airbrush with lacquer thinner.

As far as I'm concerned, Rustoleum is just another enamel paint, and I'll even thin the stuff in the cans a little with mineral spirits for brush painting, but it's very slow drying, and it's my opinion that the Rustoleum spray cans are virtually unusable.

Steve

I like Ace Hardware enamels for stock car chassis and cage work. They dry fairly fast (faster in the dehydrator) and hold up better to handling. The Tamiya sprays wear through pretty quickly.

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On 12/28/2023 at 2:58 AM, StevenGuthmiller said:

Another issue with Rustoleum that I see frequently, (on the Facebook groups) is clogging nozzles.

I've also seen people get really excited when they contact Rustoleum to complain about clogged nozzles, and are sent a whole bag of replacements. :rolleyes:

You would think that this might be another clue that even Rustoleum knows what kind off product they're producing.

You would also kinda think that one of those paint-wizards would have heard of soaking nozzles in lacquer thinner.

Clears 'em every time.

Of course, more often than not, the clog is actually inside the can...the dip tube or the valve.

image.png.8113eae94b3878d608359173bda39d3d.png

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2 hours ago, bobss396 said:

I like Ace Hardware enamels for stock car chassis and cage work. They dry fairly fast (faster in the dehydrator) and hold up better to handling. The Tamiya sprays wear through pretty quickly.

In a project to do a period build using period materials and parts, I used Ace Hardware black "lacquer" to paint the body shell. It looked great...until I had to go back into it months later. It lifted and cracked just like enamel. The photo below is as-shot the first time.

image.png.3b89fadb4a995ab8e3821e7f9fdc3e02.png

Same thing with their white "lacquer" I used as a gloss surface coat on a set of masters for a custom lakester body shell. A relatively simple job turned into a nightmare, and frankly, ended up compromising the quality of the build so badly, I've had to re-do much of it.

image.png.424e07e031e93e350a38b1345f2b6a11.png

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8 hours ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

You would also kinda think that one of those paint-wizards would have heard of soaking nozzles in lacquer thinner.

Clears 'em every time.

Of course, more often than not, the clog is actually inside the can...the dip tube or the valve.

image.png.8113eae94b3878d608359173bda39d3d.png

The real issue is not that the nozzles can’t be cleaned, it’s just the fact that you shouldn’t have to soak your spray nozzles every time you use the stuff.

I bought a few cans of Rustoleum a few years ago, hoping that they would be a good choice for spraying chassis parts, etc.

Problem was that the nozzles plugged up on every can after the first use, a couple of them during the first use!

I can honestly say that from my brief experience with Rustoleum spray paints that there is no worse paint delivery system on the market!  At least not that I’ve seen.

 

 

 

 

Steve

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This is exactly why risking the use of hardware store paints isn't worth it ;it's bad enough to have to strip paint,  however if there is a large amount of body work you will end up redoing most of it if you have to strip the paint.

8 hours ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

In a project to do a period build using period materials and parts, I used Ace Hardware black "lacquer" to paint the body shell. It looked great...until I had to go back into it months later. It lifted and cracked just like enamel. The photo below is as-shot the first time.

image.png.3b89fadb4a995ab8e3821e7f9fdc3e02.png

Same thing with their white "lacquer" I used as a gloss surface coat on a set of masters for a custom lakester body shell. A relatively simple job turned into a nightmare, and frankly, ended up compromising the quality of the build so badly, I've had to re-do much of it.

image.png.424e07e031e93e350a38b1345f2b6a11.png

 

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