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I've been using this paint stand for years now. I was made by Shabo the same company that made the letter transfers for tires. Unfortunately they are out of business, however I also have a new one someplace as well.

 

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That Shabo stand is pretty much identical the my favorite I made from a coat hanger and piece of wood.

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Ever try gluing tthe tamiya stand together?

Instead of gluing the stand. just put some tape around it to keep it from coming off. 

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The old coat hanger is really the best.  Started using one in 64.  They never get old.

 

 

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I also have a Shabo unit like the one Nick showed.  I bought it for about $10  probably 20 years ago.  It  wasn't worth taking the time to make one to avoid spending $10 and I've gotten many years good use from the expense.

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I also have a Shabo unit like the one Nick showed.  I bought it for about $10  probably 20 years ago.  It  wasn't worth taking the time to make one to avoid spending $10 and I've gotten many years good use from the expense.

ehehe ... unless you live only 5 min from the hobby shop, Tom, It took me less time to make than for you to go buy one. :D  ... mine's about 20 also.

 

 

Besides, I never saw that Shabo stand until this thread.

Edited by Foxer

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For 50 years I've been painting model car bodies by sticking them on a pop or beer bottle with a loop of masking tape.

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I use a pair of kelly clamps, also known as hemostats. I haven't found anything I want to paint yet that doesn't have a tiny spot underneath to clamp the hemostat to, and then I hold it in one hand and paint it. When done, I clamp the handle of the hemostat in a small bench mounted vice. I aslo hold it in the vice if I don't need to move it around while painting. Has worked for 45+ years.

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My favorite method still relies on this massively-high-tech adjustable and programmable tool that fits everything, adjusts automatically, and turns the body or part as I paint...again, all automatically. B)

DSCN0163_zps5f38d474.jpg

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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My favorite method still relies on this massively-high-tech adjustable and programmable tool that fits everything, adjusts automatically, and turns the body or part as I paint...again, all automatically. B)

 

Least you are smart enough to put gloves on,  you can see plenty of people posting the various Facebook model groups and their fingers have about the same amount of paint on them as whatever it is they just painted

Edited by martinfan5

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My favorite method still relies on this massively-high-tech adjustable and programmable tool that fits everything, adjusts automatically, and turns the body or part as I paint...again, all automatically. B)

DSCN0163_zps5f38d474.jpg

So, when you're done painting, do you just stand around until the paint dries? :D

 

Steve

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So, when you're done painting, do you just stand around until the paint dries? :D

I always thought watching paint dry was a very pleasant way to spend a summer afternoon. ;)

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For 50 years I've been painting model car bodies by sticking them on a pop or beer bottle with a loop of masking tape.

I have done all of the recent kits I've shared with a rig made from a coat hanger. But the Coke can with tape idea.... that would solve lots of issues the coat hanger brings. Primarily stability and rigidity. I'm going to have to try this. Thanks Snake.

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I have done all of the recent kits I've shared with a rig made from a coat hanger. But the Coke can with tape idea.... that would solve lots of issues the coat hanger brings. Primarily stability and rigidity. I'm going to have to try this. Thanks Snake.

The only draw back to using a coke or spray can is access to the inside of the body.

If you want to get any color on the inside of the body or roof, the can will interfere with that.

But I still do it this way on many occasions.

 

Steve

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I have done all of the recent kits I've shared with a rig made from a coat hanger. But the Coke can with tape idea.... that would solve lots of issues the coat hanger brings. Primarily stability and rigidity. I'm going to have to try this. Thanks Snake.

Not a can, a bottle. For the last decade or so I've been using quart beer bottles, three of them, which lets me work on several projects at the same time. If you want/need more weight in the "stand" for whatever reason, you can fill it with sand or even just water.

As to the comment about painting the inside of the body, I can't recall a time I've needed to paint the inside of the body the same as the outside. I usually just paint the headliner area and lower body edges with a brush. When I need to paint the headliner a light color like white or tan, I'll airbrush that first and then mask all that off before painting the outside of the body.

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Not a can, a bottle. For the last decade or so I've been using quart beer bottles, three of them, which lets me work on several projects at the same time. If you want/need more weight in the "stand" for whatever reason, you can fill it with sand or even just water.

As to the comment about painting the inside of the body, I can't recall a time I've needed to paint the inside of the body the same as the outside. I usually just paint the headliner area and lower body edges with a brush. When I need to paint the headliner a light color like white or tan, I'll airbrush that first and then mask all that off before painting the outside of the body.

Yeah, I've been painting the interiors first.

Quart beer bottles - hmmm...... I don't have any. Guess I know what I'll be doing tonight! I'm sure my wife will understand.

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As to the comment about painting the inside of the body, I can't recall a time I've needed to paint the inside of the body the same as the outside.

If you've built some of these old annuals you will Know that many times there can be all sorts of things exposed that you didn't count on.

If the chassis mounts "up" a bit in the body, you'll be able to see missing paint on the inside of the lower body.

If you have no inner fender detail, like the '65 Monaco I'm working on right now, you can see the inside of the front fenders with the hood open.

Sometimes the interior can mount a little low in the body as well, exposing a thin line of unpainted area on the tops of the doors.

Depending on the subject, you may have to take this sort of thing into consideration.

I always try to get a little color on certain parts of the inside of the body.

Better to do it at the beginning than to discover it later.

 

Steve photo DSCN4720_zpskbwihr4f.jpg photo DSCN4719_zpspspmhtnd.jpg

 

 

Edited by StevenGuthmiller

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If I want some color on the underside of the body, or headliner I do it first before painting the outside. If It's the headliner, I let it dry and then mask it off before painting the outside of the body.

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If I want some color on the underside of the body, or headliner I do it first before painting the outside. If It's the headliner, I let it dry and then mask it off before painting the outside of the body.

I usually paint my headliners later, after the body is done.

But I figure why not do all of the body color at one time?

I'd just as soon do it all in one session.

 

Steve

 

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If you've built some of these old annuals you will Know that many times there can be all sorts of things exposed that you didn't count on.

If the chassis mounts "up" a bit in the body, you'll be able to see missing paint on the inside of the lower body.

If you have no inner fender detail, like the '65 Monaco I'm working on right now, you can see the inside of the front fenders with the hood open.

Sometimes the interior can mount a little low in the body as well, exposing a thin line of unpainted area on the tops of the doors.

Depending on the subject, you may have to take this sort of thing into consideration.

I always try to get a little color on certain parts of the inside of the body.

Better to do it at the beginning than to discover it later.

 

Steve photo DSCN4720_zpskbwihr4f.jpg photo DSCN4719_zpspspmhtnd.jpg

 

 

I typically paint those inner body areas black, with a brush. I only occasionally go all out and do the "body color overspray" thing.

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I typically paint those inner body areas black, with a brush. I only occasionally go all out and do the "body color overspray" thing.

I only do some underbody detailing when there's an engine in the kit.

Curbside builds get the black treatment as a rule.

 

Steve

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Besides Bills amazing technology which I am privy to as well, I highly recommend a beer bottle.

For some reason Corona Light works best :)

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John the Tamiya stand will come apart if you turn it over to far. I found that out after I purchased it. I need to rig it up so it does not come apart.

Simple way to do that, (with both Tamiya stands), is to glue the top part to the bottom one. It'll still rotate properly & not come apart that way.

Other than fixing that, I've yet to find a better paint stand, (homemade or otherwise), in nearly 50 years of model building, (off & on that is).

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Best thing I found too use is one of those mini gatorade bottles perfect for putting some tape on the cap, and attaching a body. Also allows me to move the body in any form of way to paint it. I also use the tamiya paint stand, (just be sure when using that stand to only get the body mounts, set to hold the body at its lowest setting, to much pressure holding the body on the stand can bend your car body outward)

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