Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

Why go to all the trouble of a nostalgia look and leave the Edelbrock sticker on the carb ?


Recommended Posts

I've given that thought some consideration and find it to be incorrect on several details: the first pic, primarily, shows quite a lot of effort put into making the car fit a theme, such as period-perfect; the other pics do not show quite as much effort in keeping with the "theme". There are period-correct replacements for nearly all of the anachronistic parts. More apt is the idea that the builder KNOWS what needs to be replaced to make the car "complete" and is working on getting them. Even those parts that have no modern replacements could be safely and reliably used in a seldom-driven or even a daily driver rod. Having an "era-specific" styled rod carries with it an obligation, almost, to keep the accessories and details "correct" if at all possible. i.e., sponsor decals or dragstrip logos that fit within the car's "era".... an appreciation for the way things were done, pride in having something unique, etc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nostalgia nailhead, with an alternator? A local guy has an "old school" 40's Nash with a first gen Chrysler Hemi, complete with a billet serpentine belt set up. 

Real hot-rodders in the olden-days (when I was young) put alternators on their engines when they became available because they charge better at low revs...and REAL hot rods (as opposed to poseur pretend wanna-bees) are about function. B)

They were, by the way, still making nailheads when alternators came out.

Far as the carb sticker goes, everybody knows an El-de-brock (note spelling; I see a lot of mouth breathers spell it that way) sticker is worth at least 5 HP.;)

The air filter on the first photo looks like a period sand-cast CalCustom (or that ilk) part. They were rough as cobs, and the outer flanges (visible) were "brushed" (with about a 40-grit stone).

And far as block-hugger headers go, people WERE capable of welding back in the olden days too. Not every set of headers came in a box from some factory. Lotsa guys made headers that fit in close to the engine out of necessity. Like me. (Try putting a Chebby 327 in a Triumph Stag. :P)

Edited by Ace-Garageguy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

...that thought... incorrect on several details... Having an "era-specific" styled rod carries with it an obligation, almost...

Glad you added that 'almost, because without it the question needs to be asked ... obligation to whom exactly? There is a rulebook for these now?

Real hot-rodders in the olden-days (when I was young) put alternators on their engines when they became available because they charge better at low revs...and REAL hot rods (as opposed to poseur pretend wanna-bees) are about function. B)

Amen.

Howsoever, this gent is neither a mouth-breather poseur or an idiot. He's put together a cool , dependable truck that has logged thousands of highway miles with little trouble. It was built by him for him at his own shop and I doubt he's losing sleep over a bunch of guys on a model car forum putting his truck back on the trailer because it doesn't quite match their 'taste'  :lol:

 

mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What says he was even going for a "look" ? Maybe he was just building it the way he wanted it. How many "nostalgic, "era specific" or 'old school" cars have radial tires ? Radials didn't really enter the American scene until the late 60's. 

Spot on Jon, most of us build our cars out of what we can get, and how WE want them,  and apart from the pedantic rivet counting club,, nobody really cares about an Edelbrock sticker on a sweet build.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because they built it without a "Build Committee" dictating which parts they could or couldn't use to build their Hot Rod.  Two some people could care less what others think or care about it's their Hot Rod.  Three They probably couldn't find a sponsor to bankroll building their Hot Rod.  Four it's their Hot Rod!   Five The people who chip their gums the most about period correct Hot Rods, Vintage Cars, Brit Cars...  don't even own one!   Six Maybe they know they're not competing for The Riddler Award and could care less, they just wanted a nice driver...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And there's not a whole lot of guys who can work on a carb anymore anyway, much less an old Carter. At least an out-of-the-box Edelbrock clone ought to run OK with just a little effort and not much knowledge.;)

I know, I know...peel off the sticker. But what's more annoying to a real hard-core picker of nits...an obvious Edelbrock with the sticker peeled trying to masquerade as a Carter, or an actual Edelbrock with an Edelbrock sticker? ;);)

Edited by Ace-Garageguy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The sticker is not the only item out of place. The headers are not period and it looks like the steering is a bit more modern. I think he was going for the look without being overly conerned with being period completely. You really have to be looking for the sticker. The headers are much more obviuos.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...Yeah, and the red urethane bushings in the engine mount too. The plug wires aren't '50s type. Look at Packard wire and Rajah ends.

But the technology existed to build headers identical to those during the '50s. Borgeson steering joints were available, or aircraft-surplus types. The rod-end bearing supporting the steering shaft was available. I'm not sure about the availability of the double-D steering shaft.

Still, who really cares? It probably goes like hell and is a blast to drive.

Isn't that the real point of building stuff?

It is to me, anyway.B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with everyone in the last few posts...

If someone really gets fussy, there are many other ways to tell a vintage AFB from a new one.

have a pair of Carter Comp series AFB's on the shelf - bought them new in '74 and finally getting close to putting them on something..  but now I'm kind of afraid to use them because the ethanol content in the local gasoline won't play nice with that old aluminum.  I can see why the Edelbrock carbs are so popular

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just saw a set of block hugger type headers in a July 1960 issue of Hot Rod magazine. Honest Charley Speed Shop was selling them for Ford, Chevy, Pontiac, Buick... for $39.95. Difference is the collector shape looks like the early square type versus the later triangle shaped collector. So there's nothing wrong with those headers, (like there ever was). I stopped hanging around over at that Traditional Hot Rod site a while ago, just for the reason that there are too many "Rivet Counters" who seem to think someone else's Hot Rod is their "build by proxy". Even to the point of badgering and bullying the builder if they do something the "In Crowd" doesn't like.. No one owes anyone anything on the parts they prefer to utilize when they assemble their Hot Rod. It's amazing that people get far less excited about the trash used to put together a rat rod than they do when someone decides to put the wrong valve covers, wheels, headers, mufflers, nuts and bolts, or a dreaded fiberglass anything on a Traditionally Themed Hot Rod. As long as it drives and the owner enjoys driving their Traditional Hot Rod who cares!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is my opinion:

I don't care about what components a person uses to build their hot rod. If it makes them happy, awesome. Naturally, as I look the car over I will see things that I would have done different. The guy looking at it next to me will do the same and our ideas probably won't be 100% agreeable. 

However...

If an owner / builder of a hot rod is going to stand next to it and boast that it is period correct to specific era, year, whatever - then every detail of the car should be spot-on. 

I will add that as I stand and look over a hot rod the biggest thing that bothers me is when there is no consistent theme to a car. I think that a lot of people go through catalogs and choose components on an individual basis without much thought to how they will all look together. You have to stand back and look at the big picture and ask yourself two questions, "Does this all look good together?" and "Is there anything that stands out like a sore thumb that your eyes immediately focus on rather than seeing the whole car?"  

The Buick engine in the original post above is a good example. The main components follow a decidedly vintage theme (engine choice, valve covers, valley cover, intake, probably the air filter lid) while it is sprinkled with a couple of very modern parts like the billet MSD distributor / plug wires and the ceramic coated headers. The red of the cap and wires also clashes with the pale green engine paint. (Would you wear seafoam pants with a red t-shirt?) It would have been just as easy to use an early Delco dual-point distributor with a black cap and black wires with regular plug boots.A flat black hi-temp coating is also available that is just as durable as the silver ceramic. If it were mine I would want the focal point to be the vintage Buick engine, not the red ignition components and shiny headers. If those components were toned down all the eye would see is Buick goodness.

Details truly do make or break any custom vehicle and they are very much worth the time to get right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a picture I took a couple of weeks ago at a local car show and posted on another forum. I'm sure I can find a way to give the armchair quarterbacks here a chance to talk to the owner so they can spell out clearly what's wrong and tell him not to do it again :rolleyes:  :lol:

 

...not that I don't agree with having a cohesive package, but if a guy wants a dependable road-going vehicle compromises may be needed. Lots of good points raised here starting with Greg's, but the owner's happy with it and I'm sure not going to whiz on his parade...

 

mike

 

Edited by mk11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has anyone ever hot rodded to your standard Greg?

So tell me...why is it any more acceptable to attack the standards of the OP than it is for the OP to question the standards of a rod builder?

Nobody has to agree with Greg's comments, and Greg doesn't have to praise what he sees as flaws in a build.

But somehow, it always turns personal.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How am I attacking anyone? Nobodys asking him to praise anything. Maybe you can tell me why its acceptable for you to butt in and put words in my mouth? Greg starts lots of threads about what he thinks is dumb, so I asked if anyone had ever hotrodded to his standard. I also wonder why he'd take the time to start threads about all the different ways people do things he doesn't agree with. How about a couple threads about stuff you do like Greg?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...