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Lovefordgalaxie

1964 Ford Galaxie 500 XL

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That is a very, very sharp machine.

I do like the Gaurdsman Blue. I might do that on mine with a blue interior.

Definitely a car to be proud of!

Charlie Larkin

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Beautiful model! Your careful detailing takes what's basically an out-of-the-box build to the next level.

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Looks great, Guardsman Blue is probably one of my all-time favorite colors, and not just because of its association with Shelbys, but because it's just a cool color!

And to add to Harry's tip, a little bit of pearl white paint on molded-in headlights works wonders, too, without drilling or altering the kit.

Yes, a carefull painting would improve the looks of the front end. I think I already did some testing with this kind of detail painting, and at the time, I didn't like the result because I didn't know how to do it properlly I guess.

As for drilling the headlights, and installing clear lenses, I would never do that. Please, don't get me wrong, but I LOVE the promo features of those 1960s tooling kits, and that includes the metal exles, the simple frames, the one piece grille/headlight/bumper assembly, and even the fact it has no engine.

If I start changing this, the model will start looking like a modern kit, with lot's of tiny parts, and bits, and zero historic appeal to me, just like a restored car compared to a original survivor. As a car is only original once, a model kit is only a original if it's from the same era as it's subject, and iven tough I build new tooling kits, the old ones are really special to me.

Like I said, the old tooling kits are from the same era as the real cars, designed by guys that not only SAW the real cars, but SAW THEM NEW on showroom floors, smelled that brand new car scent inside a 1964 Ford Galaxie, let the "magic" in, and they did the best they could, with the resources they had at the time. I feel I have no right to mess with what they produced, so I leave their mesterpieces alone, and just add paint and foil, two things that could have being done at the time. This Galaxie for example, was foiled with a technique that is used since the 1950s by modelers here in Brazil, that is the white glue and household aluminum foil techique. I have a video on YouTube showing how it's done.

I guess I'm old school to the bone :D :D

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Very well said Tulio, I agree with all of the above.

And your outstanding model proves your point.

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it's a nice kit, and the only suggestion i can think of is sanding off all of the trademark stuff on the bottom. and man there's a LOT of stuff to sand off this car! It's still nice, otherwise.

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I neglected to say in my previous post that your Galaxie is one really, really nice build- it looks very convincing in that parking lot.

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it's a nice kit, and the only suggestion i can think of is sanding off all of the trademark stuff on the bottom. and man there's a LOT of stuff to sand off this car! It's still nice, otherwise.

Actually, that's not trademark stuff. The kit is a reissue od a dealer promo used to promote the real car. All that writing are the cars specs, and features wrote to inform the potential buyers of what they would get buying a '64 Gal. It was a commom practice on promos, and I would never even dream about sanding that off.

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Actually, that's not trademark stuff. The kit is a reissue od a dealer promo used to promote the real car. All that writing are the cars specs, and features wrote to inform the potential buyers of what they would get buying a '64 Gal. It was a commom practice on promos, and I would never even dream about sanding that off.

ahhhh that makes sense then. shows what i know about promos :) good job though

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ahhhh that makes sense then. shows what i know about promos :) good job though

Promos are cool!!! I wish the real ones, from the 60s, and not reissues, were not so expensive to get :unsure:

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As for drilling the headlights, and installing clear lenses, I would never do that. Please, don't get me wrong, but I LOVE the promo features of those 1960s tooling kits, and that includes the metal exles, the simple frames, the one piece grille/headlight/bumper assembly, and even the fact it has no engine.

If I start changing this, the model will start looking like a modern kit, with lot's of tiny parts, and bits, and zero historic appeal to me, just like a restored car compared to a original survivor. As a car is only original once, a model kit is only a original if it's from the same era as it's subject, and iven tough I build new tooling kits, the old ones are really special to me.

Ok, now I see why you left them as is. Thanks for the explanation. :)

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Really like the historical details on the chassis , never realized they were there. Did you use silly putty masking or just a steady hand for painting the chassis?

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Really like the historical details on the chassis , never realized they were there. Did you use silly putty masking or just a steady hand for painting the chassis?

Sorry about the dellay, I just saw your question now.

I don't even know what is silly putty masking. How does it work, do you just put the putty there and use it as a masking media?

I don't use masking to paint the frames, they are too complicated to masc, so I brush paint the black with acrylic pint over the bese enamel red oxide.

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