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Greg Myers

Where's the *#+"! GAS Cap ?

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So what are you... about David Spade size? :lol:

LOL Yes I am a short guy Harry. Helped me out pumping gas , but not checking under the hood of trucks at Sohio .

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LOL Yes I am a short guy Harry. Helped me out pumping gas , but not checking under the hood of trucks at Sohio .

Well, I'm 6' 7"... and getting down low enough to fill up the Impala is a long way to go for me! :lol:

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So then you really are David Spade size! :D

I was 5' 6" once. I think it was 6th grade... :lol:

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So then you really are David Spade size! :D

I was 5' 6" once. I think it was 6th grade... :lol:

He is listed as 5'5" so I am taller than him. At my height every inch counts. LOL Being this short makes driving my Stang a pain to get in and out of. The seat has to be up far enough for me to get the clutch to the floor (short legs and all). With a power seat going back and forth is not an option. It moves to slow. I wish I would have picked an automatic. OH well, I have had it for 12 years now almost 47,000 miles. No winter driving for me in this.

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Okay here's one for you. Name the car. It should be fairly easy.

post-10661-0-59948800-1413838332_thumb.j

Scott

Edited by unclescott58

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Man those cars were beautiful.

Yes they were. One of the all-time American classics. But imagine how much better it would have looked without that silly fake spare thing on the trunk.

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Being this short makes driving my Stang a pain to get in and out of. The seat has to be up far enough for me to get the clutch to the floor (short legs and all). With a power seat going back and forth is not an option. It moves to slow.

I have the exact opposite problem. I have to have the seat all the way back, and even then my knees are almost touching the dash.

But I have no problem reaching the clutch pedal... ^_^

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24117840001_large.jpg

You got it Bill. I think this is one of those cars that gets better looking with age. For a mid-50's car, it sure is a clean design. And sorry Harry, I've got to disagree with you on the spare tire hump. The hump gives it personality. In general I dislike "continental" spares on cars. With exception of the original Lincoln Continentals and the Continental Marks that followed.

Scott

Edited by unclescott58

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I hafta agree with you unclescott on that Continental, it is one fabulous car just the way it came from the factory.

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And sorry Harry, I've got to disagree with you on the spare tire hump. The hump gives it personality.

One man's "personality" is another man's "cheap styling gimmick."

A car this clean and classically styled doesn't (and shouldn't) rely on gimmicks. The pure styling alone is all that's needed, anything more is detracting from the car, not adding.

Just a quickie 10-minute hack job, but I rest my case:

continental_zpsa74ccab2.jpg

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All the cars and SUVs I've had have had gas caps on rear quarter panels behind doors. A couple of them have had odd locations for the gas door release, though..the Fox Mustangs had a button in the glove box.

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24117840001_large.jpg

One man's "personality" is another man's "cheap styling gimmick."

A car this clean and classically styled doesn't (and shouldn't) rely on gimmicks. The pure styling alone is all that's needed, anything more is detracting from the car, not adding.

Just a quickie 10-minute hack job, but I rest my case:

continental_zpsa74ccab2.jpg

It looks nekked, Harry! <_<

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When my boss bought his '90 Lotus Esprit at a B-J auction in L.A. we went to gas it up. Finding the fuel doors wasn't too hard; what had him really furious was we couldn't find the release for the crummy things. It sure wasn't where the owner's manual showed it to be. Crawled all over the inside for half an hour (no fun because the doors don't open that far) before I found it in a completely different place than it was supposed to be (somewhere around the center console? I forget).

Edited by ChrisBcritter

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A friend of a friend has a late-model Euro somethingorother with an electronically-controlled, solenoid-operated gas filler door. The actuation solenoid or the circuit to it failed, and the door won't open.

Apparently, there's no way to manually open the thing if it fails...other than using a pry bar and ruining it.

Pure design geniuses at work...again.

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24117840001_large.jpg

I am with you on this one Harry. Now get rid of the exhaust coming through the bumper for a better flow of the rear of the fenders .

Grabbed the wrong photo OOPS LOL

Edited by 1930fordpickup

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I am with you on this one Harry. Now get rid of the exhaust coming through the bumper for a better flow of the rear of the fenders .

Grabbed the wrong photo OOPS LOL

As far as I'm concerned, you grabbed the right picture. I must admit though, the photo shopped Mark without the hump doesn't look too bad. But, still like it with both the hump and the bumper exhaust. Even with thoughs features, it's still a very clean looking car. Considering it comes from the mid-1950's.

Scott

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chevy-gas-cap.jpg

Borrowed your photo... I had a 1956 Chevy and the down side of this was that sloppy attendants would get gas all over the tail lights, and as cars got older and seals shrunk gas would wind up inside the lenses. I had my car in the late 1970s and had to replace both lenses because the fuel over the years had ruined them. I believe these had cork gaskets on them too,

I also remember those fillers behind the license plates... and how the spring holding the plate in place would eventually break. How many cars did we see on the road with these broken and the plates hanging down backwards?

My only problem today is remembering which side my filler is on when I drive my different cars. Both my Caravan and Breeze have left side fillers and my Jaguar and Geo Tracker have right side fillers (cars designed in RHD countries)!

Edited by Tom Geiger

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