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Dusty and old: Paint help


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Hello!

 

I have questions, and I do not know where to ask them, so I think here is as safe as possible.

I want to do a Plymouth GTX (my fav car) as a dusty old heap. I want to do a yellow like the picture below, but I have only done one old car, which was a version of Christine from the beginning of the movie.

If anyone has any hints and tips that would be amazing! (PS I would rather not use an airbrush, I am not particularly comfortable with it yet, and I cannot find a GTX for cheap near me so messing up would be very upsetting...)

Dad's Dusty Pony: 1969 Camaro Z/28 | Barn find cars, Camaro, Old vintage  cars

Rob's Movie Muscle: The 1977 Camaro Z/28 From Transformers

Dusty 1973 Chevrolet Camaro LT – Barn Finds

Basically Complete: 1967 Camaro – Barn Finds

Thanks everyone!

Love this forum

Edited by Ceaser_Salad
Needed to add pictures
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This kind of paint effect is hard to pull off with a spray can, you really need an airbrush. You paint the body the normal color first. Then you lighten and flatten the color and lightly spray the upper parts of the body to give it the sun-faded look. From there it's chalk pastels or other various weathering powders to grime up the flat surfaces to give it the barn find look.

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I haven't tried this on a model but you might want to get yourself a blending stump from an art supply store, and use that to apply chalk in patches.  Try it on something you aren't worried about messing up.

You could use a paper towel, but these are cheap, and give you a little more control.

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Hmm alright,

Thanks for the tips you guys!

I do have an airbrush, I am just not particularly good with it. However, I have seen other people use salt to do rust and scratches, and they used an airbrush to lay light paint coats ontop of that. Maybe I will try that alongside the pastels and the lighter colours on the high points.

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If I were doing it, I'd put a tiny bit of light tan and light gray paint in some thinned Dullcoat (clear) and airbrush it on till I got the effect I wanted. 

I've actually done this on a chassis to portray daily driver wear and weathering, and thought it came out pretty well. 

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1 minute ago, Snake45 said:

If I were doing it, I'd put a tiny bit of light tan and light gray paint in some thinned Dullcoat (clear) and airbrush it on till I got the effect I wanted. 

I've actually done this on a chassis to portray daily driver wear and weathering, and thought it came out pretty well. 

Oh do you have a link to the build (if it is on here)?

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Weathering is an art in itself (and I'm not particularly good at it).  Unless you have some undiscovered talent, don't expect your first attempt to look good.  I recommend practice, practice, practice (on some unimportant models) before attempting to weather the replica you're building.

Also, watch instructional videos.  YouTube is full of them. Maybe search for "weathering scale models" to find some.

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2 hours ago, Ceaser_Salad said:

Oh do you have a link to the build (if it is on here)?

No, in fact I've never photographed that particular model. But I definitely plan to use the technique again if ever I feel the need. 

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15 minutes ago, Snake45 said:

No, in fact I've never photographed that particular model. But I definitely plan to use the technique again if ever I feel the need. 

Hm alright, well I will look out on your future builds should you do one with that technique. Thanks for the tip anyway!

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I’d check out some armour or aircraft modeling sites, lots of information out there on weathering of this type. I’d also check out Ammo and AK brands pigments and weathering products. They make some pigments that would work excellent for this. Again...see military model sites.

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21 minutes ago, Fantom said:

I’d check out some armour or aircraft modeling sites, lots of information out there on weathering of this type. I’d also check out Ammo and AK brands pigments and weathering products. They make some pigments that would work excellent for this. Again...see military model sites.

Good idea, I will do that.

Thanks!

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