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Sprayng Molotow chrome; anyone here ever done it?


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Since I can easily buy Molotow refills, I'm very seriously considering stripping some chrome parts, cleaning them up and spraying with Molotow Anyone here ever done this? If so, what did you use for thinner, and can you post some photos of the results?

Thanks a bunch,

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I'll soon be starting a '32 Ford sedan, and things like the bar across the radiator front, needs to have mold parting lines sanded smooth, and of course this will also strip the chrome right off. So I'm looking for methods, short of sending the parts to a chroming shop, to allow me to do it myself.

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Molotow airbrushes very well without thinning. It can be handled lightly after several days drying time. The results are excellent. The radiator shell, headlamps and exhausts on the Mercedes below as well as the bumpers on the Ferrari were airbrushed Molotow. 

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Molotow does have its limits... it's not as durable as kit chrome and doesn't like to be overcoated or handled much. On the plus side it doesn't require any special prep other than a perfectly smooth surface. 

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1 hour ago, jaymcminn said:

Molotow airbrushes very well without thinning. It can be handled lightly after several days drying time. The results are excellent.

Molotow does have its limits... it's not as durable as kit chrome and doesn't like to be overcoated or handled much. On the plus side it doesn't require any special prep other than a perfectly smooth surface. 

So you don’t need a primer or black base?

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43 minutes ago, NOBLNG said:

So you don’t need a primer or black base?

No. Just shoot it straight, I shoot at 24psi and only needs a moderate 1st coat as it levels quite well. All in the prep as with everything..the wheel was primered and the test cab was just laying around no prep on that.

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8 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

I'll soon be starting a '32 Ford sedan, and things like the bar across the radiator front, needs to have mold parting lines sanded smooth, and of course this will also strip the chrome right off. So I'm looking for methods, short of sending the parts to a chroming shop, to allow me to do it myself.

Are you talking about the spreader bar that goes between the front frame horns? If so, cut a section of aluminum tubing to fit, polish it and replace the kit part completely.

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1 hour ago, gman said:

Are you talking about the spreader bar that goes between the front frame horns? If so, cut a section of aluminum tubing to fit, polish it and replace the kit part completely.

No, the arched part that passes right in front of the radiator, with a headlight on each end.

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7 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

No, the arched part that passes right in front of the radiator, with a headlight on each end.

A couple of things I did on the only ‘32 Ford I’ve completed, is to add pins to the bar ends and the headlight buckets. The bar can then be attached with a drop of CA under the fenders. To the headlight buckets I added pins of soft .020” beading wire. This allowed the wire to be tweaked slightly to align the buckets. Then glue and clip off the excess wire.

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Edited by NOBLNG
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I know it’s not really fashionable anymore Kevin, but you might want to give Alclad chrome some consideration rather than Molotow.

Yes, you do need to use a base under it, but it can be virtually any glossy finish at all.

Doesn’t need to be black, or lacquer, or whatever.

I use black primer with a coat of Testors clear enamel and it works just fine.

The only reason that I suggest it is because Alclad is cheaper, can be shot directly from the bottle, and most importantly, as it is an actual lacquer paint, and not a graffiti ink, it’s been my experience that given a little time to cure, Alclad is much more durable than Molotow.

I don’t think that I’ve kept any secrets about my thoughts about Molotow, but in the end, I want to help you.

By all means, try them both and then make your decision, but don’t make it based on the flavor of the month.

 

 

Steve

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46 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

I agree, Steve. I don't want to lock into any one process, but I also do like to explore other options.

I get it Kevin.

Of all of the “ chrome paint” options, I just have the least faith in Molotow.

It was never designed for this purpose, nor was it designed to be anything permanent.

I just have a tough time using anything on my models that has no track record of any substance.

 

Carry on.

 

 

 

Steve

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2 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

I get it Kevin.

Of all of the “ chrome paint” options, I just have the least faith in Molotow.

It was never designed for this purpose, nor was it designed to be anything permanent.

I just have a tough time using anything on my models that has no track record of any substance.

Carry on.

Steve

I'm stripping the bumpers of a Challenger right now, and they'll be Alclad, as that's what I have the most of.

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Plenty of chromes about.    Molotow, Alclad and AK  just to name some of the most popular airbrush types.

Now Revell are wading onto the scene with their aerosol chrome too. It will be interesting to see how durable it is when handled compared with the others, and if they will also supply it in bottles to airbrush at some time. Read somewhere that the Revell aerosol chrome will retail at £35 in the UK. Now that is really  expensive considering the normal overspray going to waste when using an aerosol.

From my experience the chromes are all on the soft side. Sealing can also be a bit of a minefield finding the right one that will not dull your chrome finish.

There are of course many craft aerosols purporting to give a shiny chrome like finish when you see the 'chrome' strip stuck around the lid, but in actual use many of them finish looking more like the surface of sheet aluminium.

Edited by Bugatti Fan
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