Harry P.

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About Harry P.

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    MCM Ohana

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  • Website URL http://harrypristovnik.com

Previous Fields

  • Scale I Build 1/8

Profile Information

  • Location NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name A mere layman...

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Harry P.'s Activity

  1. Harry P. added a post in a topic This ever happen to anyone else?   

    I doubt there are any regulations that call for manufacturing cans that leak.
  2. Harry P. added a post in a topic Pocher 1933 Bugatti Type 50T   

    The left side of the engine, bolted to the frame. You can see the modified exhaust manifolds with added mounting flanges and "bolts" that are cut from hex-shaped styrene rod, and some of the scratchbuilt external oil lines and fittings. That round gizmo at the left front of the engine is the water pump... the round hole in the center is where the hose to the radiator will go...

    And the right side, with scratchbuilt linkages...

  3. Harry P. added a post in a topic Pocher 1933 Bugatti Type 50T   

    Bugattis were known for their "clean" engine compartments. Things were neat, tidy, and uncluttered under a Bugatti's hood, and they had a few tricks to make it that way. For example, here is the unique position of the generator, mounted to the inside of the frame rail, and driven by a belt off the driveshaft. Doing it this way obviously kept the generator out of the engine bay and kept the Bugatti's engine looking clean and uncluttered.

  4. Harry P. added a post in a topic Pocher 1933 Bugatti Type 50T   

    Before hydraulic shock absorbers came along, cars had friction shocks. Each shock absorber consisted of a series of metal plates sandwiched with discs of friction material between them. The amount of stiffness in the shock was adjusted by how much you tightened the outside cap. The more the plates and friction discs were compressed, the tighter or "harder" the shock action. Here are the parts for the four friction shocks...

    And here, with the shocks assembled, you get a better idea how they worked. Two of the arms were atached to the axle, the other two arms to the chassis...

  5. Harry P. added a post in a topic Pocher 1933 Bugatti Type 50T   

    Sometimes you'll find a "tool" in the strangest place. My bottle of liquid cement just happened to be the perfect diameter to fit the front recess in the gas tank perfectly!

  6. Harry P. added a post in a topic Pocher 1933 Bugatti Type 50T   

    Speaking of the gas tank...
    the metal straps that hold the tank in place come flat, the builder has to bend them to shape. Would have been nice if Pocher had supplied a template or diagram, but nooooooo. You're on your own! Kinda tricky to get the correct bends in the exact right places to wrap neatly and tightly around the tank without gaps, but eventually I got it. Here we are looking at the chassis upside-down with the straps ready for the tank...

  7. Harry P. added a post in a topic Pocher 1933 Bugatti Type 50T   

    Here you can see how the rear springs look installed on the chassis. A different way of doing things than was typical in the early '30s. Notice the twin holes in the gas tank for the filler tubes. Yes, two of them, one on each side. You could pull up to the pump in this car from either side and "fill 'er up." A nice feature!

  8. Harry P. added a post in a topic Pocher 1933 Bugatti Type 50T   

    And here you can see how the springs attach to the (almost finished) rear axle. It's different, that's for sure!

  9. Harry P. added a post in a topic Pocher 1933 Bugatti Type 50T   

    Up front this Bugatti had a fairly typical suspension setup... solid axle and leaf springs. But in back they went a different way. Instead of the typical leaf spring setup, they went with quarter-elliptical springs, mounted "upside down" to the way leaf springs are typically mounted. Here are the parts for one of the rear springs. Spring leaves are real spring steel...

    Here are the completed rear springs...

  10. Harry P. added a post in a topic Pocher 1933 Bugatti Type 50T   

    The frame on this kit is metal... very stiff and sturdy, and when you bolt it together it's square and flat, unlike the soft, wiggly plastic frame on my Pocher RR woody. The metal frame is a much better way to go. Lots of detail on this one, including all of these little pulleys located on the inside of the frame rails. Cars of this era had mechanical brakes (not hydraulic), and different manufacturers had different approaches as to how best to design a braking system. My RR woody has an incredibly complex rat's nest of rods and levers to make up the braking system, but on the Bugatti the brakes were actuated by cables. These pulleys will ultimately be threaded with brake cables. A much cleaner and simpler approach than Rolls' way of doing things.

     
  11. Harry P. added a post in a topic Barracuda....Back from the dead   

    BTW... I also thought a phone was supposed to be a phone. Not a device to write letters on, or watch movies, or play games. Silly me.
    Remember how just a few years ago cell phones were hyped as being small? Smaller was better. Now just the opposite... the bigger the screen, the better. All these new functions and capabilities. And oh yeah, just in case you need to actually make a phone call, the thing can act as a telephone, too! I think...
  12. Harry P. added a post in a topic Barracuda....Back from the dead   

    That is the winner of my "Best Post of the Week" award.
    I love it. Every word. Well done, sir!
  13. Harry P. added a post in a topic Barracuda....Back from the dead   

    Homonyms...heteronyms...
    Can't we all just get along?
  14. Harry P. added a post in a topic It's not just California. The southwest is in a serious draught.   

    I bet the casinos are still seriously watering down the drinks...
  15. Harry P. added a post in a topic Even ''Predicta''kit has accuracy issues   

    Wrong!
    An artist or sculptor is creating his or her vision, not attempting to accurately recreate reality.
    Van Gogh's "Starry Night" is not an accurate reproduction of the way the night sky actually looks. It is Van Gogh's personal interpretation, and it doesn't necessarily have (or need to have) any direct connection with reality.
    On the other hand, a pattern maker or draftsman's job is to create an accurate reproduction of the original. There is no room (or need) for "artistic interpretation" if the goal is to create an accurate scale version of a full-size subject.