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Paint removal

15 posts in this topic

Posted

What is the best thing to remove Tamiya spray can paint from a resin body

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Posted

91% isopropyl alcohol removed it. Never tried it with resin.

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Posted

Can't remember where I read/heard it, but it seems alcohol may do some nasty things to resin.  Makes it rather soft or something to that effect.  I would  possibly try Super Clean or Purple Power or maybe some LA Awesome (Dollar General and reasonable) first. 

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Posted (edited)

Easy Off oven cleaner ..Yellow Can..use brand name not the cheap stuff.. spray it down good ,  now depending how old the paint is let set from 6 to10 hrs then take a old tooth brush and scrub off under warm water..keep repeating till all gone then wash with warm soapy water..

Edited by yh70

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Posted

I would not suggest using Super Clean or Purple Power with a Resin body. I lost a '56 Bel Air two door that way. It may have just been the Resin that the caster used, but the body turned real soft and was of no use after that. You might even contact the caster if you know who that is, and get a suggestion from him.

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Posted

If I'm not mistaken, Super Clean has the same active ingredient as Easy Off--lye. So if Super Clean is bad for resin, Easy Off will be, too.

Also, Easy Off doesn't need 6 to 10 hours to work. 15-20 minutes is sufficient. At that point, hit it with an old toothbrush, rinse, repeat as necessary. I've stripped (plastic) bodies in an hour or less this way (3 or 4 treatments). I've also had bodies with multiple coats of thick paint take 6 or 8 treatments.

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Posted

Dettol works great on acrylic, enamel, cellulose (lacquer).

See here.

(Can be diluted 1:1 and still as effective)

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Posted

Mike that was a very interesting tutorial! We don't have that particular brand name here in the states.....would you know what the equivalent would be here?

I'm also looking for something safe to strip resin. I've not tried this before as I've never had to strip resin in all my years of building, but I have a '57 Buick Century that could stand to be stripped of its paint. Another project I want to try someday to restore. 

Thoughts anyone? :unsure:

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Posted

Remember that what works to strip paint from styrene might not be safe for resin, and vice versa.

And there are all kinds of resin, so what works for one might damage another.

If I were you, I'd experiment with a chemical on the inside of the body.

I'd also be hesitant about letting resin sit/soak in anything. In your shoes, I might try lacquer thinner or nail polish remover in a wipe on/wipe off scheme--get it on and off before it can soak into the resin.

Good luck and let us know what works.

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Posted

Mike that was a very interesting tutorial! We don't have that particular brand name here in the states.....would you know what the equivalent would be here?

I'm also looking for something safe to strip resin. I've not tried this before as I've never had to strip resin in all my years of building, but I have a '57 Buick Century that could stand to be stripped of its paint. Another project I want to try someday to restore. 

Thoughts anyone? :unsure:

I wasn't aware Dettol wasn't readily available in the US, it's rare that we have something in the UK that you can't get elsewhere, (apart from Hendersons Relish, the best fish n chips, steak, stew and soup sauce ever, ahhhh).

As for an alternative, I truly don't know, I do know that the supermarket 'own brand' Dettol variants in the UK don't work the same.

Had a quick look on amazon.com and you can get it on there though

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Dettol

The one I use is diluted 1:1 with water and has been on the go for about a year now and I've just last week stripped a bike body and panels of cellulose primer with it so it will last a long time, all the paint that falls off settles as sediment in the bottom and you can filter this off but I've not done so yet.

I'd offer to mail you one but with all the changes and restrictions applied since I last sent things to my friends in the US it'd likely be illegal being a liquid or more expensive than getting a bottle from amazon.com.

I prefer Dettol over everything else I've tried, (I've tried oven cleaner sprays, horrible, choking fumes and watering eyes included, thinners, solvents and various other things, Dettol is designed as a disinfectant to be put on skin and though the smell is very 'medical centre disinfectant' it won't hurt you, whereas oven cleaners and brake fluid and such are nasty nasty chemical concoctions that you don't want anywhere near you if you can help it.

As mentioned though, re resins, I've done little work with resin and it's best to test a small piece or one area to see if it reacts, if it's fully cured it shouldn't but best to check first.

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Posted (edited)

Looks like the U.S. FDA isn't too keen on chloroxylenol, the antiseptic ingredient in Dettol. It hasn't been banned outright, but products containing  chloroxylenol are hard to find in the States. Dettol contains isopropanol, causing me to question whether it's compatible with resin, as posted by TarheelRick above.

Seems Amazon is the answer for anyone wanting to try Dettol as a paint stripper.

 

Edited by Dodge Driver

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Posted

You may want to contact the caster that made the body to find out what they suggest. I can't speak for all casters, but I do know that Modelhaus and Jimmy Flintstone resins both do very well with Superclean. Modelhaus even suggested Superclean in their instructions.

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Posted

Bill, the '57 Buick I have I'm 99% sure that it came from R&R. Unfortunately, Ray passed away a few years ago, and last I heard his wife Ruth is not doing well these days. Steve Kohler sells Ray's models through Star Models-----I guess I could get in touch with him, but he may not know what Ray would have recommended.

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Posted

Please do not use 91% Isopropyl alcohol on a resin body.  I tried that on my Modelhaus '59 Olds convertible and it turned the body to mush.  Luckily I was able to order another body just before Modelhaus quit taking any more orders.

See the post here http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/topic/112650-1959-olds-98-convertible/

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Posted

OP what was the manufacturer of the resin? As stated above, DO NOT use IPA on resin, from what I've seen it will soften it up and cause it to lose its shape. I've used Super Clean on various types of resin with no ill effects, but again as stated above, depends on the resin used by the manufacturer. I've used SC safely on Studio 27 Model Factory Hiro, Historic Racing Miniatures, Le Man Miniatures and something else Im forgetting atm. Best course is if no one has used it safely on the brand you have, contact the manufacturer and ask them directly, if that is an option.

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