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What is your method to the madness for clearcoating over decals on body perfectly?


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1 hour ago, Plumcrazy Preston said:

Yes, only about decal application but nothing about clear-coating over them. I only have simple decals to lay on relatively-flat surfaces anyway. I will use the instructions as provided by my decal printer, www.highballgraphics.com, to lay the decals. Yes, a couple mist coats before laying clear heavy over the model. Back in 1992 I tried to clear-coat a model F-15 with a spray bomb from the hardware store and the decals just curled up and floated right off the model plane. I was dumping that stuff on heavy. That model was trash. I did also build a model R/C sailboat that same year with flat tan for the hull out of a spray bomb and that finish actually turned out pretty neat. I never have much trouble with flat paints out of an aerosol can, only gloss colors can give me nightmares. 

Actually, the way I'm reading Rust-Oleum's response, the second paragraph is absolutely about clearcoating over decals. However, I don't see Rust-Oleum's answer to the other questions in your letter to them.

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46 minutes ago, Bucky said:

Actually, the way I'm reading Rust-Oleum's response, the second paragraph is absolutely about clearcoating over decals. However, I don't see Rust-Oleum's answer to the other questions in your letter to them.

But the TIPS (the PDF they attached to me email) are only about applying decals. There is nothing in the email body about mixing with thinner or whether a mist should be sprayed over decals. I presume the label on the back of the bottle will have all the dope on that. 

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10 hours ago, Plumcrazy Preston said:

There is nothing in the email body about mixing with thinner or whether a mist should be sprayed over decals. I presume the label on the back of the bottle will have all the dope on that.

You might be disappointed.  But there is plenty of advice here, if you bother to take it.  Glosscote and Dullcote are just generic hobby clear lacquers. Unfortunately we live in an imperfect world, and there are no exact detailed instructions encompassing every possible application provided on most modeling products' labels.

Edited by peteski
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35 minutes ago, peteski said:

You might be disappointed.  But there is plenty of advice here, if you bother to take it.  Glosscote and Dullcote are just generic hobby clear lacquers. Unfortunately we live in an imperfect world, and there are no exact detailed instructions encompassing every possible application provided on most modeling products' labels.

I agree. A friend of my had the white in decals react to the clear he used(I believe it was Tamiya)

The best advice is to test. You need to use some of the exact decals and test those with your final clear coat mix. 

You need to try several ratios of clear to thinner mix. You want to add enough thinner to allow the clear to flow but you want to avoid making the mix too thin. By testing you will  find what works for you.

Also test the lacquer paint mix both clear and final color on the sprue from the kit you are building to make sure you don't craze the plastic. 

Testing is the only way to know precisely if you are going to have issues. Although others may make suggestions as to say mix ratios there are too many variables that can cause disappointment. 

Test, test, test. There is no substitute for testing.  There are no short cuts if you want to accomplish good results.

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22 minutes ago, bobthehobbyguy said:

Test, test, test. There is no substitute for testing.  There are no short cuts if you want to accomplish good results.

As I see it, David is not looking for shortcuts (well, maybe not). He seems to be looking for exact instructions he can follow word-for-word to achieve perfection.  Man, I wish I had that type of instructions for all sorts of things I deal with in my life.  That would be awesome!  But that is a pipe dream.

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1 minute ago, peteski said:

LOL!  If a moderator posts a "lets grab some popcorn and watch this thread" animated GIF, we know we have something really, really good here!  👍

 

Look, we may be moderators, but we're also people who have the same thoughts as everyone else.

And sometimes, we get frustrated or snippy or angry or any other emotion as well.

We just keep our thoughts hidden away most of the time. 

Every now and then though, a little humanity slips out. lolz

 

:)

 

 

And believe me, we ARE watching this thread.

 

Personally, I just want to see people here build their models and have fun. And I like it when a person asks for advice, other people give a ton of great advice, then that person takes that advice, and gets better because of it. And really, I think everyone that posts here feels the same way.

So when the opposite happens....well, here we are.

 

Let's just keep it civil, and not get so serious about every little thing.

Peace out...

 

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Anyway...

If you want to see some excellent videos on this subject, check out this guy on You Tube.

He sometimes uses spray cans, sometimes airbrushes, sometimes both on the same build, and he gives a lot of details about what he's doing and why. AND he discusses clearcoating over decals.

 

His builds are great.

The guy I posted earlier in this thread is even better.

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Dan that is a great video.

A couple of observations. The times for when the paint can be recoated depends on the manufacturer. Different paint has different formulas which can require different recoat times. Violating the recoat times can lead to a disappointment ie the paint may wrinkle. 

With painting there are no true one size fits all instructions.

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On 9/17/2021 at 4:11 PM, Plumcrazy Preston said:

Why are you car folks so obsessed over panel lines anyway? 

For the same reason aircraft modelers are.  
 

You’re trying to emulate the look of a gap between two panels, where one doesn’t exist on the model.

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It gives definition to what would be separate panels on a 1:1 scale automobile. I've scribed panel lines deeper on models that have faint, or shallow lines from the molding process. I've even done the gas filler doors that way on a lot of the ones that have them on the rear quarter panel. It just adds to the realism that a lot of modelers strive for.

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1 hour ago, CabDriver said:

For the same reason aircraft modelers are. 

You’re trying to emulate the look of a gap between two panels, where one doesn’t exist on the model.

And in most cases they make those lines (and also rivets) way too prominent.  At the scale size they make the gaps between the panel lines, the real aircraft would not very aerodynamic.  Those looks more like technical drawing (or an artistic rendering) of the aircraft than the real aircraft.

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On 9/17/2021 at 4:11 PM, Plumcrazy Preston said:

Why are you car folks so obsessed over panel lines anyway? 

Because on a real car, the panel lines are obvious.

If you spray paint a model and don't do anything about the panel lines, realism suffers, and the point of building a miniature replica is to make it look as real as possible.

If the panel lines aren't darkened in some fashion, especially on a light colored car, the body color fills the panel lines and the vehicle will look like it has no doors.

It will look like a "toy".

 

image.jpeg.66a574ce8b4930970c42fd3098333f30.jpeg

 

 

Steve

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3 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

Because on a real car, the panel lines are obvious.

If you spray paint a model and don't do anything about the panel lines, realism suffers, and the point of building a miniature replica is to make it look as real as possible.

If the panel lines aren't darkened in some fashion, especially on a light colored car, the body color fills the panel lines and the vehicle will look like it has no doors.

It will look like a "toy".

 

image.jpeg.66a574ce8b4930970c42fd3098333f30.jpeg

 

 

Steve

It would be nice if kit manufacturer's would just make doors, hoods, trunk lids and gas cap doors separate from bodies and doors that open to boot. 

Edited by Plumcrazy Preston
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3 hours ago, Plumcrazy Preston said:

It would be nice if kit manufacturer's would just make doors, hoods, trunk lids and gas cap doors separate from bodies and doors that open to boot. 


They do and when you build one of those kits you’ll understand why most kits don’t offer those features. Revell do a 57 Chevy with opening doors etc. challenging to built. 

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4 hours ago, Plumcrazy Preston said:

It would be nice if kit manufacturer's would just make doors, hoods, trunk lids and gas cap doors separate from bodies and doors that open to boot. 

Honestly, I would rather spend 10 minutes darkening panel lines than hours trying to get doors to fit properly.

 

 

 

Steve

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54 minutes ago, Sandboarder said:


They do and when you build one of those kits you’ll understand why most kits don’t offer those features. Revell do a 57 Chevy with opening doors etc. challenging to built. 

The Revell tri-five Chevys with the opening doors are probably some of the worst engineered kits ever produced.

Not to say that most other kits with opening components were much better.

 

 

 

Steve

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14 minutes ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

The Revell tri-five Chevys with the opening doors are probably some of the worst engineered kits ever produced.

Not to say that most other kits with opening components were much better.

 

I built the Revell '56 Chevy w/ opening doors and trunk when I was 7 in 1977...swore off opening door kits for a long time after that...maybe was too much for my very first glue kit.  I then built several of much simpler AMT Countdown Series kits...

Edited by Rob Hall
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