Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

*Painting Coilover Shocks*


Recommended Posts

What I normally do for coilover shocks is paint the whole unit semi gloss black and then come back with a silver Sharpe and highlight the springs.  It doesn't come out the greatest sometimes so I'm looking for idea's on how you guys get the job done.    

20210831_101222.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I couldn't have seen the shock well enough without the use of my headset magnifying glass.  This headset get used a lot and was well worth the money.

20210831_112225_resized.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since those are plated you could brush paint it flat black and then use a Q tip to wipe the paint off the spring. For ones that aren't plated I paint them black then dry brush the spring whatever color I want it and paint the attachment points silver.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, Fat Brian said:

Since those are plated you could brush paint it flat black and then use a Q tip to wipe the paint off the spring. For ones that aren't plated I paint them black then dry brush the spring whatever color I want it and paint the attachment points silver.

Thank's for the info Brian.  I used a fine tip Sharpe and it came out pretty good.

20210831_111030.jpg

Edited by Zippi
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, NOBLNG said:

I have also used real springs.

This, but more specifically, use a metal wire to make your own springs instead of trying to source a matching pair from something existing. Use the correct gauge metal wire in a softer, more malleable material than steel, then wrap the wire around a machine bolt of the correct thread pitch and diameter. This also eliminates the need to sand the mold seam off of every coil spring loop on the kit part, which most people don't do, and which also sticks out like a sore thumb after you paint the recess black.

Yes, you'll nee to make your own shock body and perches to fit inside the coil spring.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Casey said:

This, but more specifically, use a metal wire to make your own springs instead of trying to source a matching pair from something existing. Use the correct gauge metal wire in a softer, more malleable material than steel, then wrap the wire around a machine bolt of the correct thread pitch and diameter. This also eliminates the need to sand the mold seam off of every coil spring loop on the kit part, which most people don't do, and which also sticks out like a sore thumb after you paint the recess black.

Yes, you'll nee to make your own shock body and perches to fit inside the coil spring.

Thanks for the info on making coilovers.  Ill keep that in mind about the solder.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Casey said:

This, but more specifically, use a metal wire to make your own springs instead of trying to source a matching pair from something existing. Use the correct gauge metal wire in a softer, more malleable material than steel, then wrap the wire around a machine bolt of the correct thread pitch and diameter. This also eliminates the need to sand the mold seam off of every coil spring loop on the kit part, which most people don't do, and which also sticks out like a sore thumb after you paint the recess black.

Yes, you'll nee to make your own shock body and perches to fit inside the coil spring.

Yes. I don’t know why I posted that pic. I did make my own for the TJeepster from soft aluminum wire. Copper or aluminum would work nice and still hold it’s shape. I wrap thin wire around styrene rod to make shock boots also.

1BBE4C65-9464-49CF-BEDB-C52F255AF9D9.jpeg

CC98B95F-95A7-4AAE-842C-948FCEAD600A.jpeg

Edited by NOBLNG
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks fellows.  Back on track of painting coilovers, if I would have black wash them, would lacquer thinner on a Q-tip have taken the paint off the springs after the paint had dried or do you need to get after it pretty quick?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Zippi said:

Thanks fellows.  Back on track of painting coilovers, if I would have black wash them, would lacquer thinner on a Q-tip have taken the paint off the springs after the paint had dried or do you need to get after it pretty quick?

You shouldn't have to resort to a strong solvent like lacquer thinner.  Depending on what you used for the wash, you can probably use Windex (ammonia), 91% Isopropyl Alcohol, or Naphtha.  None of these should attack the "chrome". Of course you have to do this not too long after the paint dried (but is still fresh).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, peteski said:

You shouldn't have to resort to a strong solvent like lacquer thinner.  Depending on what you used for the wash, you can probably use Windex (ammonia), 91% Isopropyl Alcohol, or Naphtha.  None of these should attack the "chrome". Of course you have to do this not too long after the paint dried (but is still fresh).

Good info.....thanks Peter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, 89AKurt said:

I would not use Sharpie pen.  At least in AZ, the sun's UV rays fade it out quick, like a couple of years.  I'm no pro on painting them, so will lurk and learn.

Thanks Kurt.  It will more than likely never see the light of day so I think I'm good to go there.  

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...