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Yeah, the Qashqai has that X-Tronic sport mode as well. Haven't tried it yet...

Up until the day when I could no longer move my feet fast enough to step on the brakes in a hurry, this was my chosen daily driver: about as basic as you can get and still not get the s*&t kicked out of going down the road. Wish I could still drive it...

No computers, no fancy back up systems, no A\C, no ABS, etc... just a basic car.

 

Let's hope you never get hit by a modern two ton plus mid size car. It will squash you like a bug.

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Bought the wife a Cube in 2009. She thought it was cute.....my 6' 2" frame was very comfortable in it. 

The few times I drove it I never warmed to the CVT....LOVED the design of the car.....biggest small car on the market.....but that CVT just was not my cup of tea. Does yours control it's speed on downhills in cruise mode??? Ours would run away from us. 

I love my 2006 Scion xB (aka. Toyota bB outside of USA).  Tiny brick-shaped car with enormous passenger compartment and oodles of headroom.  It is like a clown-car. You should see the look on peoples faces seeing 5 tall guys get out of it.  I think it came out before the Cube and Nissan simply copied the idea.  Then there also is the similar "hamster-mobile" (Hyundai Soul).  When xB first appeared I thought it was the ugliest car around, but it grew on me enough to buy one. I actually like the fact that it stands out of all the soap-bar-shaped around us.  It has a conventional 4-speed automatic transmission with converter lock.  It handles pretty well too (probably due to the wheels placed at the extreme corners of the vehicle). Like a go-kart.

But the Cube never grew on me. With the thick pillars, rounded windows, and asymmetrical rear it to me looks like a caricature of a car. Like it came out of a Roger Rabbit movie. But I'm sure it is just as fun to drive as my "box", "fridge", or "toaster". :D

Edited by peteski
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OK.

Planned obsolesce. The more computers and chips on a car, easier it is to enforce it, and making the customer to "have" to buy a new model. 

Couldn't care less. Have a pretty good parts stock, even tough parts for my car are readily available.

When cars are involved I demand a frame separate from the body, rear wheel drive, a V8, carburetor, points, three speed on the tree, bench seat, and bias ply tires all around. My favorite tire is the Firestone Wide Oval by Coker. They cost 5X the price of regular white walls around here, but driving on radials is not my cup of tea. 

 

SAMSUNG GALAXY 261.jpg

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The manufacturers are trying to figure out ways to meet mileage requirements while still meeting customer expectations. Few people buy manual transmissions anymore and hardly anybody sees CVTs as an acceptable transmission so the answer is to add more gears to conventional automatics. When I was little, I remember my granddad wondering why anyone needed a four speed. He figured three was enough for anybody!

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Gary , I'm having a hard time trying to visualize a 10 speed automatic  myself in an automobile . I have seen what a Detroit Allison looks like in a Ford F-700 with a 3808 Caterpillar .

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There are cutaway pics of the Ford/GM 10spd it in this article...looks slick.  I'm content with the ZF 8spd in my Jeep, but I'm sure they will have a 10spd in Jeeps eventually when I'm ready for my next one.

https://www.caranddriver.com/flipbook/10-things-to-know-about-the-new-fordgm-10-speed-automatic-transmission#1

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There are cutaway pics of the Ford/GM 10spd it in this article...looks slick.  I'm content with the ZF 8spd in my Jeep, but I'm sure they will have a 10spd in Jeeps eventually when I'm ready for my next one.

https://www.caranddriver.com/flipbook/10-things-to-know-about-the-new-fordgm-10-speed-automatic-transmission#1

You're the kind of consumer the car companies love.  

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Gary , I'm having a hard time trying to visualize a 10 speed automatic  myself in an automobile . I have seen what a Detroit Allison looks like in a Ford F-700 with a 3808 Caterpillar .

To get all those forward speeds in something small and light enough for an automobile, the internal parts that make it possible are necessarily much smaller.

There's no engineering free lunch, and no matter how trick the friction materials and lubricants get, component life WILL become an issue at much lower mileage than in older designs.

The car builders don't give a damm. As long as the thing makes it out of warranty, they're happy.

They'll also be happy to sell the poor bastard that buys one used a complete trans for $5000 or $10000.

Already, in 2007, Jag would not supply ANY internal parts for an auto box. It was factory new, or junkyard.

Trans shops today are barely competent, in most cases, to rebuild a 3-speed Turbo-Hydro. When the 10-speeds start going, forget it...even IF you can get parts.

But hey...everybody believe this insane level of complication is good. Buy, buy, buy.

Bye bye.  

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I'm impressed...guess I misunderstood somewhere along the line. Sorry.  :D

Now my new one, I don't think I'll keep as long..maybe up to 100k miles..17 years was too long, had too many old-car issues to deal with the last 5 years for a daily...I wouldn't want any modern car out of warranty. 

Edited by Rob Hall
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Now my new one, I don't think I'll keep as long..maybe up to 100k miles..17 years was too long, had too many old-car issues to deal with the last 5 years for a daily...

100k is probably a wise time to trade if you want to avoid the "old-car issues" on something heavily dependent on electronics and lots and lots of plastic electrical connectors that will be turning to powder by then.

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Now my new one, I don't think I'll keep as long..maybe up to 100k miles..17 years was too long, had too many old-car issues to deal with the last 5 years for a daily...I wouldn't want any modern car out of warranty. 

That's why I bought the lifetime extended warranty for my 200 when I got it 5.5 years ago, if any old car problems arise, take it to the dealer with a $100 bill and let them get dirty and frustrated on the non basic stuff.   That said, one dead transaxle past the 100k where the factory warranty drops out will pay for that extrended warranty!

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I just bought a 2017 Ford Escape - the base model. When you see "starting at $....", this is what you get. The only (no cost) options are the front license plate holder and CA emissions. It is definitely not manual steering, brakes, windows, transmission, heater and no radio. It is pretty well equipped with 6-speed automatic, traction control, Sync, rear view camera, electronic power steering, power windows, power 4 wheel ABS disks, cupholders galore, and the list goes on. It's what my parents, and until very recently I, would have considered a luxury car. The options go up from there, with park assist, lane control, adaptive cruise control, a no-touch rear door, keyless entry and many, many more.

I'm a fairly competent shade-tree mechanic; I've replaced clutches, timing belts, alternators, brakes/rotors, valves, brake lines, points, condensers, coil packs, and adjusted valves, carburetors  engine timing and drum brakes on many cars and bikes since the mid 70s. I can diagnose most problems without too much difficulty - I was trained as an electronic technician in the Navy, and have been a computer system administrator since then. This Escape scares the bejeezus out of me. I just know I'm going to take the car in one day because it won't shift right, and the dealership will tell me the Bluetooth module will need to be replaced to fix the transmission, and they'll be right. I, for the first time ever for ANY purchase automotive or not, ended up buying the extended maintenance warranty. When that expires, the car will be traded in on the next technological wonder. No more shade tree mechanic for me with this car or very likely any in the future. Shoot, I'm not sure I can have the tires replaced without a visit to the dealership to have the TPMS reset.

 

 

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Shoot, I'm not sure I can have the tires replaced without a visit to the dealership to have the TPMS reset.

 

 

Shouldn't have to go to the dealership for that. any competent tire dealer will have the equipment to reset the TPMS, which not only need reset with a tire installation, but also any time the tires are rotated.

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To get all those forward speeds in something small and light enough for an automobile, the internal parts that make it possible are necessarily much smaller.

There's no engineering free lunch, and no matter how trick the friction materials and lubricants get, component life WILL become an issue at much lower mileage than in older designs.

The car builders don't give a damm. As long as the thing makes it out of warranty, they're happy.

They'll also be happy to sell the poor bastard that buys one used a complete trans for $5000 or $10000.

Already, in 2007, Jag would not supply ANY internal parts for an auto box. It was factory new, or junkyard.

Trans shops today are barely competent, in most cases, to rebuild a 3-speed Turbo-Hydro. When the 10-speeds start going, forget it...even IF you can get parts.

But hey...everybody believe this insane level of complication is good. Buy, buy, buy.

Bye bye.  

Bill, you're quite correct sir ! See, it wasn't that long ago before my health went south of the equator that I used to be able to re build the old Cast Iron Hydra- Matics and Ford - O- Matics . Of course I also rebuilt Ford Model A and Ford manual gear boxes too . Face it , I'm a dying breed , fooling with Flat head Fords , and dreaming of days of a Dual disc clutch ......

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Shouldn't have to go to the dealership for that. any competent tire dealer will have the equipment to reset the TPMS, which not only need reset with a tire installation, but also any time the tires are rotated.

My local tire chain advertises TPMS reset as part of the installation...getting new tires for my Jeep before winter..

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I just bought a 2017 Ford Escape - the base model. When you see "starting at $....", this is what you get. The only (no cost) options are the front license plate holder and CA emissions. It is definitely not manual steering, brakes, windows, transmission, heater and no radio. It is pretty well equipped with 6-speed automatic, traction control, Sync, rear view camera, electronic power steering, power windows, power 4 wheel ABS disks, cupholders galore, and the list goes on. It's what my parents, and until very recently I, would have considered a luxury car. The options go up from there, with park assist, lane control, adaptive cruise control, a no-touch rear door, keyless entry and many, many more.

I'm a fairly competent shade-tree mechanic; I've replaced clutches, timing belts, alternators, brakes/rotors, valves, brake lines, points, condensers, coil packs, and adjusted valves, carburetors  engine timing and drum brakes on many cars and bikes since the mid 70s. I can diagnose most problems without too much difficulty - I was trained as an electronic technician in the Navy, and have been a computer system administrator since then. This Escape scares the bejeezus out of me. I just know I'm going to take the car in one day because it won't shift right, and the dealership will tell me the Bluetooth module will need to be replaced to fix the transmission, and they'll be right. I, for the first time ever for ANY purchase automotive or not, ended up buying the extended maintenance warranty. When that expires, the car will be traded in on the next technological wonder. No more shade tree mechanic for me with this car or very likely any in the future. Shoot, I'm not sure I can have the tires replaced without a visit to the dealership to have the TPMS reset.

 

 

The only thing that REALLY scares me on my 200 is the cam drive and timing systems, the VVTi parts in particular!

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My local tire chain advertises TPMS reset as part of the installation...getting new tires for my Jeep before winter..

Shouldn't be an issue on a Jeep, they use the Chrysler SKREEM system, which is the most user freindly TPMS setup being used. All it takes to reset is driving the vehicle for about 15 minutes at over 20 mph to reset. no crazy learn procedure (Ford is very bad about that) or special tools required.. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Who needs it!?? Not me!

I LOVE my 2010 Mustang GT, it makes an honest 330 HP, is an auto trans, drives great and looks like a Mustang.

Everytime I get it serviced at Galpin they try to sell me a new one, saying I'm giving up a lot of horsepower.

SO WHAT?? One thing I've learned in my 64 years is that no matter how fast you are, there is somebody faster.Not a street racer anyway, I have nothing to prove.

 

 

Edited by GaryR
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Shouldn't be an issue on a Jeep, they use the Chrysler SKREEM system, which is the most user freindly TPMS setup being used. All it takes to reset is driving the vehicle for about 15 minutes at over 20 mph to reset. no crazy learn procedure (Ford is very bad about that) or special tools required.. 

Yeah, wasn't a problem...got new tires installed last week, glad I checked the sensors before I left the lot.  They had way over-inflated one tire--the left front was reading 75 and all the others were reading 40...had them reset the air pressure in all the tires before leaving... 

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I don't believe in the fuel mileage. that's b.s.   I have a Stock 29 model a pickup , and I get a honest 28 mpg at 50 mph,  with a 3 speed that you better know how to double clutch,    200- 300 mpg have been proven a lot,,but being government you

don't want to sell a gallon a week,, you want to sell 20 gallons a week,, more tax money.   And the carbon BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH,, maybe they don,t know that trees take in oxygen, and let out carbon,  everything in the world is carbon base.

and climate chance, another story,, it chances 4 times a year,,  spring, fall, winter, spring.......

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A few thoughts about technology that I know several people will disagree. No point in arguing it, as I have experienced everything I'm about to ramble on about. 

I don't fear technology, and I don't fear change.

In my experience, these new transmissions, despite being far more complex, are actually quite a lot more reliable. Computer modelling, virtual testing, and a lot more road testing prior to launch have resulted in better product. I've been in the auto industry since 1991 and have seen the good and the bad over the years. Personally, when a manufactuer can build an 8-speed transmission that reliably handles the demands of 285hp minivans, 395hp trucks, and cars with over 800hp, all with just some tweaks to gear ratio and programming, I think that says something. And it wasn't that long ago that domestic manufacturers were building 4-speed auto transmissions that blew up at 150hp. And 4-cylinder engines that couldn't handle highway speeds.

I know from experiencing these newfangled 8, 9, and 10-speed transmissions, that you need not fear them. We've been running the 8-speed FCA and GM vehicles, and the 9-speed Jeeps in our fleet for the last two or three years, with zero issues. Our total fleet is approx 10,000 vehicles. In my division, we have about 2,000 vehicles, and I've had exactly one transmission issue...on a 2015 F350 running the old Ford 6-speed auto transmission that's been around for years. 

In fact, the only modern vehicles with issues for us are Ford trucks, 2015 and newer. We've had multiple EcoBoost turbo failures, doors not working properly (recall just announced), rear end failures, electronic issues aplenty. Not to mention that it's over $500CDN to repair a door ding on an aluminum door panel. Guess what brand I don't recommend to clients! And their new 10-speed scares me. We have a bunch in the fleet now, and I'm feeling anxious about them.

With a lot of these new transmissions, they have a sport mode, which does more than just hold the shifts longer. In the Grand Cherokee, Charger/Challenger for example, it changes the shift patterns, changes throttle response, and when you use the paddle shifters, it allows you to downshift exactly where you would with a manual tranmission. it's almost, dare I say it, fun. And there's the problem with the new cars.

As much as I like the new product, the manufacturers are losing sight of the fun factor. There is something immensely satisfying about a car with a manual transmission, and few/no babysitting controls, and an empty road. Ferrari and Lamborghini haven't built a manual transmission in a decade. Porsche have switched to their PDK in their highest performing cars. Same for BMW. The Bugatti and Aston Martins are all autos with manual modes. Mercedes haven't had a manual for sale in North America since the original SLK, and good luck finding one of those. And these cars are all great, and fast, and reliable, and all that. But they're not as satisfying to drive. I know the auto is faster, and that the computer can shift faster than a human, and measure all the car's telemetry and downshift exactly where needed. But working the left pedal and rowing the gears is just more fun. I would gladly drive a slower car just to get that feeling.

And personally, I want quite a few of the high tech "fancy" features. Despite the cost, I want LED headlights. Heated seats & steering wheel? A must have. Upgraded stereo, with bluetooth streaming? another must have. A vehicle without AC? Yeah, that's called a bicycle. Rear park sensors and backup cameras? In my truck when hooking up a trailer? Oh yeah, need that.

 

As for our own garage? Yes, I drive new trucks. Always current model year, and change them like underwear, but I consider that job research and I never lose money, so it's all good. Wifey drives a 2006 Volvo XC90 with 220,000km, loaded for the time, but nowhere near the equipment levels of new vehicles. As for toys, over the past few years, they've ranged from mid-80s VWs to a mid-90s VW and Camaro to a new Challenger 392. And every one has been a blast to drive, and none has been fully loaded.

 

Anyway, my two cents. 

 

 

:)

 

 

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