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Luc Janssens

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About Luc Janssens

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    MCM Ohana
  • Birthday 07/10/1968

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  • Location Belgium

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Luc Janssens's Activity

  1. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic 1/25 Revell Ford FD-100 Pickup   

    Think that's a good thing, cuz when engineering for "pre-paint", one looks for ways to make it easy to paint the kit, in a production environment, something the casual modeler will appreciate I'm sure.
    The metal axle thingy....wonder what the profile was of all who voted on Facebook, think it might explain a lot.

     
     
  2. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Shizuoka Hobby Show 2017, Few More Pic's Added.   

    Indeed, the white one looks just like the one, my Grandfather on my mother's side, owned.
    Will buy that one for sure, for sentimental reasons...
  3. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    There are a few more which could've inspired certain models, I'll post them sometime..
     
     
  4. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    1973 Ford Bronco, by Mike Boyle
    1) What subject would you kit, and why? 1973 Ford Bronco. One of the greatly overlooked "SUV" subjects.  
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design. Skill level 2, adult audience.  - Chassis: Separate ladder frame, multi piece suspension with separate coil and leaf springs  - Drive-train:  Full detail 289/302 small block, separate 3spd or C4 tranny, accurate Dana 20 T-case  - Body:  1 piece "tub" with separate windshield, hood, doors and tailgate. Stock rear 1/4 panels with light scribe on inside to indicate where to cut for "sport flares." Full hard top.  - Interior:  Simple molded as part of body tub. Stock bucket and rear bench seats. Stock 4 point roll bar. Decal for guage cluster.  
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? Name them, and why? - Drive-train upgrades: 3" lifted coil and leaf springs. Rancho shocks for lifted suspension.  - Body add-on's: Optional "sport" fender flares for front and rear. Swing-out tire carrier. 1/4 cab and back cab wall. Inserts for door openings.  - Interior options: Racing or Sport bucket seats. Floor shifter. Full 6 point rollcage.  - Wheels & tires: 5 (not 4) Nice modern 35" radial mud terrain tires (BFG style). 15"x8" Aluminum slot mags.  - Decals: 4wd aftermarket logo sheet (similar to the contingency sheets AMT use to put in their kits)  
    4) Are there alternative versions possible from that tool?, and if so, what parts can be used for both versions? Alternative kit #1: Stroppe Bronco. Most kit parts will carry over. New decal sheet and laser cut paint masks included in kit.  
    Alternative kit #2: Big Oly Baja Bronco. The body would be about the only thing that would carry over. New full tube race chassis, correct detalis, decal sheet and laser cut paint mask. (Info on Big Oly can be found by searching link on Stroppe Bronco at bottom of the page)  
    5) How do you want the packaging?  - Box art: Typical layout, photo of real vehicle on box top, one side panel showing photos of built model in stock and custom versions  - Info on the box: Building and parts options  - Box vs. parts layout: Larger box (size of the Revell '50 Ford P.U.)  - Packaging of the parts: Bagged as normal, white plastic, chrome, windows, tires, decals in clear packaging, instructions calling parts by name and giving full factory color options.  6) The bean counters went all over your little project and it seems the kit  you're proposing slightly exceeds the budget, luckily you are in the  planning stage, so what do you lose, and why? </b> I'd lose the 1/4 cab and rear wall, the full roll cage and that’ s it! 
  5. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    1952 Hudson Hornet, by SpeedyO.K,  I'll give it a go.  
    1.) What subject and why? 1952 Hudson Hornet This was one of the most significant cars of it's era. An engineering feat in it's "Step-Down" advertising and design. One literally stepped down to enter this automobile while the others were riding high. (Hmmm..a factory low-rider!) This factor offered excellent handling with it's lowered center of gravity.
    2.)Target audience would be skill level two to advanced. Parts breakdown would be along the lines of AMT's 49 Merc. Remember, Hudson’ s were simple but effective cars. One could make the argument for marketing this kit as a convertible and include two optional tops to build a standard coupe or Hollywood hardtop version. That alone offers three building options from one tool.
    3.) Chassis. These were uni-body cars and as such would be modeled along the lines of much later MOPARS. Posable steering, separate exhaust and suspension lowering options are a must.
    4.) Drive-train. Separate parts for drive-shaft, differential and springs.
    5.) Interior. Floor-pan, separate side panels and rear seat. Stock and custom dash. stock and custom seats, scale fuzzy dice for the rearview.  
    6.) Body. A clean and crisp one peice molding with separate hood. Bright work options to create'48 to '52 models. Custom parts include full fender skirts, lake pipes, frenched headlights,'59 Caddy tail lights, etc. Again ala '49 Merc kit.  
    7.) General. The engine in this kit offers one of the most powerful flathead 6 cylinders ever manufactured. Twin H (dual carb) production engines were 308 cubic inches and could and did give Rocket 88 Oldsmobiles fits. Wheels would be stock steelies with options for stock or custom wheel covers. Tires would be period wide whitewalls with optional later low profile tires.  
    8.) If the bean counters (get the shotgun, Ma!) object, I'd say chuck all the custom parts and just give me the basic kit! My imagination will take care of the rest. Maybe this will make my thoughts clearer.
  6. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    1975-’ 76 Ford Gran Torino Sport, by D. Van
    1) what subject would you kit, and why? 1975/76 Ford Torino 2 door. This is the famous Starsky & Hutch car. But it also is the first car NASCAR driver Bill Elliott drove in a cup race. The car also fits the new ‘ Mainstream’  theme of American cars. Very few Fords where modeled during this time frame.  
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design.  Wide target audience. This would mean a kit along the lines of the Revell ‘ Wheels of Fire’  Chevy Monte Carlo. I would like to see a 3 piece chassis with nice detail and separate simplified front and rear suspension clips. Body would be a showroom stock trim. An interior with separate side panels would make using it as a stocker would be simplified.  
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? name them, and why? Wheels and tires. Factory style Slot wheels with period BFG tires. Maybe a S&H stripe in decal and/or die cut stick on - or both as Polar Lights have done.
    4) Are there alternative versions possible from that tool?, and if so, what parts can be used for both versions? I would sell it as a 3 N 1 kit. S&H Torino, Period street machine using a mix of stock and S&H parts and some stock wheel covers to build a mid range showroom Torino. The NASCAR guys would use the kit as a starting point as a Cup car. The bodies were very close to stock at this time but another chassis would need to be used for a contest model. If the modeler wanted a passable curbside stocker could be built using kit parts and some suitable wheels.  
    5) How do you want the packaging? I would see a box with box ART. A box showing a S&H Torino on a city street power sliding into a side street with a showroom stock Torino parked nearby. It would not need to be labeled a S&H Torino but rather a special edition Torino as labeled by Ford.  
    6) The bean counters went all over your little project and it seems the kit you're proposing slightly exceeds the budget, luckily you are in the planning stadium, so what do you loose, and why? About the only trimming that could be done would be losing the stock wheel covers or going to a one piece chassis. I would tend to go for the chassis first as the wheel covers are needed for the optional building versions. Going with only the decal or the sticker would help cost but not enough to make or break the project. 
  7. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    1981-87 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme 442, by Von Digger &  Bill Austin
    A: 1981-87 Cutlass by Von Digger
    1) what subject would you kit, and why? I would do a 81-87 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme. I have never seen a kit for this car and I am sure that it would make a very interesting build.  
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design. It would be a skill level 2 and want to target builders from 18-35 years of age since from personal experience I have found that the cars appeals to all of them.  - Chassis: I would want a chassis pan with the frame and chassis pan with molded in fender wells, and gas tank.  - Drive-train: A Oldsmobile V-8 with A/C, P/S pump and Alternator and all the associated brackets backed by a 200r4 overdrive transmission. The rear end would be a standard corporate 10 bolt rear.  - Interior: An Interior pan with moulded door panels. From there a seperate dash, steering wheel, a choice of either a bench or bucket seat, center console, oh yeah and a seperate back seat. The locators for all the interior pieces will be either snap style or fairly easy to glue to.  - Body: For the subject that I chose to do, the main part of the body spans all the years in question. I would include the 2 different header panels so that it could be built as either an 81-86, or an 87. The 87 version had composite headlights and not the open lights like the previous 6 years. I would also include the headlights on the chrome tree as well as the 2 different versions of the tail lights. 81-84 had a chrome strip going through the center of the tail light from top to bottom, while the 85-87 had a Oldsmobile symbol in the center of the light.  - General: nothing more than I can think of off the top of my head  
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? name them, and why? - Drive-train upgrades: I would include the parts to turn the 307 V-8 into a 350 Rocket Block for a possible street machine version.  - Body add-on's: Possibly a 72 styled 442 hood with the twin ram air option. There have been a few aftermarket companies that made this hood for the 1:1 cars and they look attractive.  - Interior options: As stated above, I would include factory buckets and a center console with a floor shifter.  - Wheels & tires: I would include a set of aftermarket style wheels and "bigs and littles" for a street machine version.  - Decals: Since the regular Cutlass had next to no real markings and what little markings they did have they also shared with their high end models, in which case would add the graphics to make it either a 442 or a Hurst olds.  
    4) Are there alternative versions possible from that tool?, and if so, what parts can be used for both versions? As stated above the main body can be used for all versions since the body remained unchanged in 7 years.  
    5) How do you want the packaging? -Box art: The car sitting in front of a dealership in stock form. Or the street machine version sitting at the local hangout.  -Info on the box: I picture of the real car on the top of the box, with pictures of a build up on the sides. -Box vs. parts layout: I would want the model put in an average size box.  -Packaging of the parts. I would want all the different trees packaged separately. The molded in color parts, chrome parts, clear parts and decals all in a protective bag, and or sleeve.  
    6) The bean counters went all over your little project and it seems the kit you're proposing slightly exceeds the budget, luckily you are in the planning stadium, so what do you loose, and why? 
    First of all I would loose the optional hood. That would be basically another part to make a mold for, albeit small, but still costly and timely. Next, I would mould the center console into the floor-pan of theinterior and get rid of the bench seat. This would combine a few parts in one as well as delete a few other parts from the mix. Lastly I would probably drop the 442 option from the decal sheet and leave only the Hurst Olds option.  
    B: 1987 CUTLASS by Bill Austin Why: There is no kit of the 1981-1988 Cutlass coupes available. It was a very popular automobile with some popular performance models, including 442’ s and Hurst/Olds versions. It is a favorite for restorers and low-riders, coming in a wide range of interior types: fairly basic, vinyl or leather buckets, and even the plush “pillow” seating of the Broughams. The 1987 was the last of that body style to be a 442, and it had the flat-face headlight modules instead of the four individual headlights of the earlier models.  Target audience: 442 fans, Cutlass fans, Oldsmobile performance fans, muscle car fans, low-rider fans, and (with future models in mind) Hurst fans.  Skill level: 2  Parts and design: A kit at the general level of the Revell ’ 87 Buick GN and ’ 87 Monte Carlo SS Aero-back kits, with the nose piece a separate part like the 1:1 car to allow easier future or aftermarket conversion to a different year model with a different nose piece and grille inserts. The interior should have separate seats and sides to allow for inexpensive changes for future release variations. The parts that would be different in future releases should ideally be isolated on separate trees from the remainder of the kit, minimizing tooling costs for variations.  It would have the 442 H.O. Olds 307 cu. in. V8, the 4 speed manual transmission, the steel sport wheels, performance tires, bucket seats, console, and emblems. It would have decals for the body accent stripes (in several original colors, if possible), 442 labels, engine compartment labels, and dash layout.  The kit would use white plastic to avoid bleed-through problems when painted.  The clear parts tree would be in a separate bag to avoid scratching.  Optional parts: I would include slapper bars, with wide and skinny tires that fit the stock wheels for a mild drag or street custom version, but would keep costs down by not including any other major optional parts in this kit, but rather design it from the beginning to be released later as a separate kit with different options like the AMT ’ 66 442 W30 and ’ 66 442 Convertible kits were. If costs allowed, some of them might be included in this kit (see versions below).  Alternative Version Number One:  1985 Cutlass Supreme Brougham. This kit would have the early nose style with the four individual headlights and the appropriate separate grille grid inserts, the V6 engine, an automatic transmission with column shift, the “pillow” seats interior with the split bench front seat, wire wheel covers, white wall tires, and the body would have the partial (back only) vinyl roof and chrome rocker panel trim either as part of a revised body or as add-on parts. This should be a favorite of the low-rider fans and if costs allowed, it could include parts for a lowered or adjustable suspension. See all-out “hopper”version below.  Parts from this kit and the first kit would allow mixing and matching for a great variety of combinations.  Alternative Version Number Two:  A “Special Edition” release, the 1983 Hurst/Olds 15th Anniversary coupe. It would mainly have parts from the previous two kits, but it would have the automatic transmission with a console and the “lightning rod” shifter. It would have appropriate grille inserts for the four individual headlights nose, a bucket seat interior, and the steel sport wheels. The decal sheet would have all the stripes, labels, etc. of the Hurst/Olds.  If the automatic transmission and console were included in the original ‘ 87 442 kit and the ’ 83 grille inserts in the original ’ 85 kit as optional parts and the parts trees of those kits were properly allocated, there would not have to be any new tooling for this kit, just a different assortment of existing parts trees. The only new thing needed would be a decal sheet with the Hurst/Olds stripes and emblems.  Alternative Version Number Three:  An all-out low-rider “hopper” version of the Supreme Brougham, with an opening trunk, speakers, hydraulics, etc. The chrome tree might be done in “gold” for this one, with low-rider style wheels and tires. This might even be one of those that actually hops. Some wild “scene” graphics on a decal sheet would be a nice item, too. Alternative Version Number Four:  A Speedway/ NASCAR type race car variant. I think A.J. Foyt drove a Cutlass of this body style for a 
    while. This would be easier for a kit maker that already has an appropriate race car kit and would only need to use the body, with appropriately redesigned nose and tail pieces like the 1:1 race cars and a decal sheet with the needed graphics.  Packaging:  Each kit should have a beautiful picture of a 1:1 car on the top and ends that can be built from the parts in the kit, a picture or two of a built model on one side, and on the other side a list with pictures of the key parts included in the kit but not visible in the main pictures: engine compartment, interior, chassis, and optional parts. This would encourage multiple kit purchases to get the exact combination of features/options someone wanted.  The instruction sheets should be clear line drawings and TESTED for correctness, including parts numbers and build sequence. Exact information for decal placement should be included.  If the bean counters want to cut back something:  Leave out the extra tires and slapper bars in the first kit. If that is not enough, use generic tires instead of correctly branded ones. If that does not do it, forget about separate interior sides and have just the front seats separate. Wait on final tooling of the second kit until the first kit sales are established, but have the parts trees contents allocated to allow the versions discussed above. 
  8. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    1965 Mercury Comet Cyclone, by Jeff Corey  
    Chassis- Platform style uni-body chassis with separate suspension and exhaust parts.  Drivetrain-289 K-code Super Cyclone 4bbl equipt'd small block Ford and optional Cobra style B/FX webers. Optional engine would be a 427 Cammer for an all out match race early funny car.  Interior- Would be factory stock buckets w/ console, separate door panels and dash. Perhaps a basic roll bar hoop set-up for the option racin' build version.Body-The Cyclone body style was a very clean design that lacked alot of extra stainless or molding trim, this would make it a BMF'rs dream, plus would keep the chrome tree parts cost down to a minimum with only front and rear bumpers and a few assorted other parts done in bright chrome.  The hood would be searate with the racy twin snorkel openings in the leading edge. Red styrene lenses for the taillights. A small PE fret with Cyclone scripts and flags and grill trim would be nice if affordable in the mix but if not then the body molded versions would suffice.  Wheels & Tires- A set of snap in whitewalls and also an insert in black for the black wall look, period correct bias ply polyester cord tires and a set of cheater slicks for the racing version.  Wheels would be the cool simulated chrome reverse caps the Cyclones used with open lug nut holes that a plate of lug nuts would attach from the back side to give the effect just like the real car used. A set of Cragar S/S or American Racing Torque Thrusts would give it some nice street or strip presence for contender look.  Decals- Some under hood decals for the "Cyclone 289", and a dash gauge insert. Some Rotunda Ford parts service items like battery, etc would be welcome.  General- This would be a nice kit to do along the lines of the new kits comin' from Polar Lights of the GTO and '65 Coronet and would tie into that era of muscle car very nice. A 2n1 with a skill level 3 if the PE was included but if the costs run too high then a drop to level two with the appropriate deletion of building versions and extra parts.  
    Packaging would be in a sturdy box, not donut boxes please! Full color shot and and alternative drag version photo on one of the end’ s. Car will have to be red for eye catchin' appeal to the consumer.  Instruction sheet features well done graphic drawings with color specs.  If deletions need to be made to make the budget, I would drop the Cammer engine, slicks, the PE fret. Mold the hood shut and go with a basic curbside with an separate engine plate like an AMT promo used for the underside.  And in closing, if there is anyway that this budget can include the services Of John Mueller to make it all happen and get it right on in the look and proportions that is a must! If his work on the new PL GTO & Coronet are any indication of his new vision, I'd want him in on this one as well!  
  9. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    Not sure on this one.....cuz dunno much about Hot Rods, you be the Judge
    1929 Ford Roadsterby Darin "Ashvillemodeler"
    1) what subject would you kit, and why? 1929 Ford roadster. This is a very popular street rod subject, and the current AMT issue cannot be built into a modern street rod with out extensive modifications and extra parts  
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design. This would be marketed as a 1:25 scale skill level two kit. It would be very detailed but easy to build. It would be made with the floor pan separate from the frames and the interior would have separate seats, and side panels. The roadster specific parts would all be on the same tree as to make it easier to change body styles in later issues. The fenders would be separate from the body. A traditional street rod suspension. Tubular dropped axle, and a chrome Halibrand quick change rear end. All stock trim would be included along with some billet accessories This would be a street rod only model. the overall parts count wouldn’ t be higher than the current Revell rat rod but would be of higher quality, and IMHO more desirable  
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? name them, and why? The engine in the kit would be a cobra style small block Ford with Webber carbs, because there isn’ t a modern version of that power plant in any current kits. (just about any other induction system is available in scale so kit bashing different set ups would be easy.) you would have a choice of either a  4 speed manual or a modern ford automatic tranny. There would be an optional ’ 32 ford frame, designed with cross braces that would allow the same exhaust and accessory placement as the 29 frame. There would be an optional independent rear suspension (chrome plated) that would be stand alone, meaning that it could be built separately on its own cross member and dropped into the frame. Not only would that make it easier to install in the kit but would also allow it to be used on other models with out rendering the donor kit un-buildable. There would be three sets of wheels and tires. One set of well done Kelsey-Hayes wire wheels with photo-etched wires, with big and little 50 style rubber. There would also be a set of “Lil’  John Buttera Style” Champ 500’ s with BF Goodrich comp T/As. Third there would be a set of modern Billets with low profile 17 & 18 inch tires. Also included in the kit would be two optional grill shells a track nose and deuce grill. There would be a second set of head lights similar to the ones on the Doane Spencer deuce. There would be three different hood sides, stock, custom louvered and smooth.  
    4) Are there alternative versions possible from that tool? Well lets see....29 woody. A sedan, a sedan delivery, a cabriolet, phaeton, four door sedan , pickup, roadster pickup, a phantom B-400 just to name a few. Not to mention someone could take the original kit and build it at least ten different ways.  1. track roadster  2. rat rod  3. Lil John butteras silver roadster  4. a 29 on duece rails  5. a full fendered resto rod  6. a modern high tech low boy  7. a 50’ s style highboy  8. an 80’ s style billet rod  9. a lakes modified  10. 60’ s style full fendered rod  
    5) How do you want the packaging? (box art, the packaging of the parts etc..) the glass and the chrome would be packaged separately and away from the other parts. The wheels and tires would be packaged separately Tamiya style  the box art would be spectacular with art work on the front commissioned by Tom Fritz. The ends of the box would be photo’ s of the assembled model on one side pane there would be a photo gallery of the different options and on the other side there would be a description of the contents and an actual size side view of the model (like MPC used to do)  When and only when you have an answer to all these questions, try to solve this one ;^)  
    6) The bean counters went all over your little project and it seems the kit you're proposing slightly exceeds the budget, luckily you are in the planning stadium, so what do you loose, and why? After crying whining and pitching a fit...I would loose the photo-etched pieces but leave the parts designed in such a way that it would be easy to convert back later. And send the art to Bob at “model car garage” and if I absolutely had to I’ d give up the optional tranny. 
  10. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    1970 Plymouth 'Cuda Coupe by Viper Dave
    1) what subject would you kit, and why? I would like to see a correct 70 Cuda coupe.  It would be a 3-n-1 or 4-n-1.kit. The Cuda was Chryslers first attempt at a real pony car.  They had the Barracuda before but is was a warmed over Valiant.  It was also the top of the Muscle car era.  You could get everything from the 6 cyl to the 6 Pac and then the HEMI.  Anyone who was raised in that time of automotive history  remembers the Hemi. The 71 Cuda has been out for a long time but the 70 was really the best one to do.  I will have to say I am a little bias because of being able to work on  and drive the Dan Gurney 
    25Trans am Cuda.  The AAR Kit that was out was a joke.  Nothing looked right on that kit.  I think it is time for an ADULT kit for the serious builder.
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design. This kit would be a level 3 kit for adults.  It would be for the serious  builder and could be built several different ways.     a) The stock Hemi Cuda coupe.   4 speed, Rally wheels, Hockey stripes and Shaker hood 2 Stock AAR Cuda.    340 4 speed  correct stripes with the correct spacing of the strobes.  Correct different front and rear tires. c) Dan Gurneys #48 AAR Cuda Trans am racer.  Minilites, racing seat, roll cage, and the engine breather system d) Drag racing version.  Either the Hemi or 340 engine could be used.   The Kit would be done with the interior build on the chassis with Side  panels, firewall and seats separate. The parts would be designed so that other versions could be done later and  the parts that needed to be changed would be on the same tree.
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? name them, and why? Optional parts would just be those to make the 4 versions.
    4) Are there alternative versions possible from that tool? Later versions like a convertible and Gran Coupe could be offered.
    5) How do you want the packaging? (box art, the packaging of the parts etc..) The box top would show a different version on both ends  on one side.   The box top would show the versions of the real cars.   Chrome and clear  parts would be in clear plastic bags and the tires and decals would be  packaged separate too.
    6) The bean counters went all over your little project and it seems the kit you're proposing slightly exceeds the budget, luckily you are in the planning stadium, so what do you loose, and why? If it went over budget then the drag racing version would be dropped and  later put in the revised versions.Final impression.   This kit would be priced around the $20 range and would be aimed at the Adult modeler and be marketed that way.  The instructions would have pics of real cars like some I have seen before. Thank you  Viper Dave
     
  11. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    1968-'72 Ford F-150 by Talk Show Mercenary
    1) what subject would you kit, and why? 1968-72 Ford F-150 shortbed fleetside 4x4 pickup. These trucks are one of my favorite Ford truck body styles, yet model kits representing them are sadly lacking from the shelves! I would elect to do the shortbed 4x4 to make this model rather unique, and because that's the way I'd want a 1:1 example to be configured!  
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design. The target audience on this kit would be wide ranging. Everyone from pickup modelers, to 4x4 and off road enthusiasts, commercial modelers, Ford nuts, and anyone looking for a late 60s/early 70s tow vehicle to haul around their favorite 1/25 scale race car, boat, or whatever! Kit design would dictate a detailed four wheel drive chassis and suspension, and a detailed 300 cubic inch inline six with manual transmission. Not that a V8 wouldn't be cool, but including the beloved 300 Ford six banger in this kit would guarantee sales to even more modelers who wish to rob this popular powerplant for other modeling projects! A nice rendition of the tough Ford engine would include power steering pump detail, separate oil pan, oil filter fuel pump, manifolds, carb, air cleaner and starter castings to make the mill worth the wait to eager hobbyists! The body would include a bed formed much like the modern AMT pickups have been, being a whole casting minus tailgate and tail lights, which would be separate pieces. The interior would feature hanging brake and clutch pedals, and a separate gas pedal to mount on the floor, rather than a 'drawing' of the pedal cast into the carpet! A stock bench seat and big steering wheel would also be included, as would a column mounted manual shifter, and a floor mounted transfer case shifter. The truck would sit at stock height and would include stock wheels with all terain tires. Underhood detail would include radiator, horn, master cylinder, heater box, wiper motor, and steering shaft/box castings, as well as upper and lower radiator hoses and plastic heater hoses.  
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? name them, and why? I'd like to include a slew of optional goodies in this particular kit. The popular off road options, such as raised suspension pieces, aftermarket wheels, bigger tires, push bar, off road lights, CB radio and antenna, roll bar, gas can, spare tire, CJ style hood scoop, exhaust header, four barrel intake manifold and carburetor, mud flaps and tool box. Such items would allow for several building options, and would help to sell this kit to a more diverse crowd.  
    4) Are there alternative versions possible from that tool? A two wheel drive version, as well as stepside and longbed variants could easily be added to the line-up by adding different bed, frame and suspension castings to the existing tool.  
    5) How do you want the packaging? (box art, the packaging of the parts etc..) This box would be slightly oversized to accommodate all those optional parts, and to allow the attractive box art illustrations to grab the buyer's eye! The front of the box should show a painting of a 1:1 F-150 4x4 in an off road setting that harkens back to the early 70s, and photos on the sides of the box should show built-up prototype models with underhood and chassis views included. Parts would be packaged in clear plastic bags with detailed instructions and a large decal sheet with early 70s style bumper stickers and other decals to give modelers a chance to build a retro 4x4!  
    6) The bean counters went all over your little project and it seems the kit you're proposing slightly exceeds the budget, luckily you are in the planning stadium, so what do you loose, and why? I'd lose SLEEP...trying to decide what to cut! I suppose I'd sooner whack some of the optional parts and maybe the vintage looking decals, but I wouldn't cut corners on the detail of the chassis, engine, body or interior!
     
  12. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    1987-'93 Ford Mustang LX Sedan by John K. Dezan
    1) what subject would you kit, and why? This one hit me last night while watching TV. I'd kit the '87-'93 Ford Mustang LX 5.0 sedan SSP a.k.a. police package car.  This car is still popular with muscle car enthusiasts even though it's been gone for 10 years.  It's also the Ford that chased Porsche's for a living.
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design. Target audience is the muscle car enthusiast, Ford fan, Mustang person and the police car/light commercial builder.  That presents a wide swath of skill levels so I'd doing along the lines of the Lindberg '97 Crown Victoria.  A snap kit with better than average engraving but it would have to have an engine under the hood which Revell has done with it's snap Vipers and the Caprice/Impala.  The kit would have to have all the appropriate police equipment for the agency offered and most Mustangs didn't have  a lightbar so that's a few less parts than the average police car kit.
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? name them, and why? I can't think of any.
    4) Are there alternative versions possible from that tool? Alternates?  You betcha!  The car could easily be offered as a civilian  LX 5.0 simply by leaving out the police gear and then you could go after  the muscle car guys by offering alternate wheels & tires along with some  aftermarket parts like a Borla exhaust and or a K&N FIPK. 
    5) How do you want the packaging? (box art, the packaging of the parts etc..) A CHP mustang at speed on a Cali. speedway chasing a Porsche like it's  supposed to do.  
    6) The bean counters went all over your little project and it seems the kit you're proposing slightly exceeds the budget, luckily you are in the planning stadium, so what do you loose, and why? I suppose that we could loose the police goodies and simply offer it as  a civilian LX 5.0.  The model aftermarket has all the stuff that's need  to turn it into a police car. John
  13. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    68-'72 Chevy Nova by John K. Dezan
    1) what subject would you kit, and why? I propose a brand new tool of the '68-'72 Chevy Nova. Why you ask? AMT's tool is ancient and those separate fenders are giving me headaches! If  they're causing me problems, can you imagine the trouble they could give to young people just starting out? Now. The Nova was offered in several basic versions all of which could be easily offered from this one tool. AFAIK, the only real difference between the various years is the seat patterns. Which would I start with? A '70 Yenko Deuce. Some of them had fenders lovers and all of them had the hood mounted tach which means a total of three year specific parts aside from the interior. Then there's the engine which would have to have all the proper brackets and etc. Decals must be support whatever version is chosen. A Deuce isn't a Deuce without it's stripes after all.
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design. Target audience would be anyone who can or would like to put a kit together. In other words, skill level 2 with a parts count of 120-150 parts. Mold lines should be placed where they can be easily  removed(edges of the parts) and I'd like to see the sprue moldings for the wheels not on the edges of the outside rim. AMT did this one their “95 Ram pickups and I applaud them for doing so.
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? name them, and why? Oh boy! Optional parts. The optional parts would depend on just which variant of the car that's done. 
    There were three different hoods available on the model interesting Novas - The base hood, the SS hood and the "Stinger" hood. Engines are another possibility. It all depends on which car is chosen to start with. 327, 396, 427 and the '70 LT1 were all available from either the factory or the supercar tuners like Baldwin Motion, Yenko and Harrel. Photo etch for the various scripts would be real nice but it would probably add to much to the price of the kit. Model Car Garage to the rescue!
    4) Are there alternative versions possible from that tool? Plenty of alternate versions are possible from this one tool as I stated earlier. It can be offered as a mild '68 327 to a '68 Harrel/Gibb 427 to a '69 SS396 to a Yenko or BM '69 427. Tochange our intrepid Deuce into a '69 Yenko 427 would require new seats from and rear for the interior and a new engine which Revell already has the tooling for from their excellent '68/'69 Corvettes although they would have to give us a proper air cleaner as neither the tri-power nor the L88 style would be correct for this version of the engine. The '69 BM 427 could then be made simply by changing the hood from the base hood to the "Stinger" style. Yet another '69 could be made in the form of a SS396. Change the hood to the SS version and voila! A '68 Gibb/Harrel 427 is virtually identical to the '69 BM 427 except for the interior.
    5) How do you want the packaging? (box art, the packaging of the parts etc..)</font></b> Box art should show a nicely restored version of whatever car is in the box. I have no complaints with how Revell is laying out the sprues so I'd leave that up to people who know more than I.
    6) The bean counters went all over your little project and it seems the kit you're proposing slightly exceeds the budget, luckily you are in the planning stadium, so what do you loose, and why? My plan is very tightly focused so I don't see any parts except for the optional photo etch that I don't see how any thing else could be left out without compromising the kit. The adult enthusiast will buy the kit to do many more things with especially if he can get support from the aftermarket like the photo-etch scripts. For example. The Canadian Acadian was basically a "Northern" Nova and could be built from any of the basic kits. 
  14. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    Another one from 2002
    03 Ford Focus SVT (by Yoda)
    1) what subject would you kit, and why?'03 Ford Focus SVT; "Tuners" are hot now, and with the factories involved we may be looking at a new horsepower race. I'll bet on being in on the ground floor...
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design. My target market....Wally's purchasing agent!  Seriously, why not an old-fashioned kit of a modern subject? Simple, one-piece chassis with metal axles, but with opening hood and engine like the old AMTs (no Hole In The Block though- isn't FWD great?) Clear lenses for all lights, everything you'll see on the built will be well-detailed but the overall kit will be simple. Molded in (non-bleeding) color, ages 10 and up. Engine and chassis molded in black.
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? name them, and why? "Custom" version #1 would be the Euro ST120, complete w/RHD dash. I think those headlights, grille and bumper will show up on a lot of custom Foci in the US, and it'll also be a hedge in case Ford gives our Focus a similar restyle. I'd include all the usual tuner parts- fresh air intake, big exhaust, extra wheels, choice of 2 body kits, but unlike R-M's Integra I'd make the stock wheels the correct size and throw in the extra tires. And the decal sheet will be huge!
    4) Possible alternative versions for the tooling. Alternate versions- how about a wagon? Or a ZX5-that might be doable with inserts alone. Then there's the Focus RS....
    5) How do you want the packaging? (box art, the packaging of the parts etc..) Packaging- Illustrated "cover", with sides showing a (well) built kit.
    6) Over-budget issues: Cuts- only one body kit, no RHD dash (but I'd keep the other Euro stuff for the above given reasons), one set of tires if I really MUST, but then I'd make the custom wheels the same size as stock.  
    '03 Ford Focus ZX3 (by John K. Dezan)
    1) what subject would you kit, and why?  I'd kit the Ford Focus ZX3. It follows the current Revell kit trend of "Hot Hatches" and the 1:1 car is popular with the younger generation that likes to "tune" their cars. This is a growth area and the model companies have been slow to catch on so there's plenty of room for growth in this area.  
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design. Target audience is the late teens-early 20 some things that are drawn the "Hot Hatch" segment. These are the people we need to draw into the model car hobby for our future success. They've got to have kits available of what they consider cool. Skill level 2 with the target being the recent Revell Acura Integra in parts count.  The parts should be engineered with as few mold lines as possible. If you can't eliminate them, than place them where an inexperienced modeler isn't likely to notice them or when they can be easily removed. The body should be molded as cleanly and evenly as possible. The less work (clean up of mold lines and sink holes) the target audience has to do the better  Clear parts should be molded evenly perhaps with full side windows just to be different.  Chrome isn't a big part of the Focus so it should be kept to a minimum - head and tail light buckets, side view and rear view mirrors reflectors and possibly a set of wheels.  
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? name them, and why? Optional parts should include a set of aftermarket tires and wheels. Perhaps a set of Enkei or Motegi wheels with some low profile rubber that would typically be seen on a day 2 Focus. A K&N FIPK under the hood would be nice as would an optional ground effects package. There are more parts and ideas but the first idea has to sell before we'll get into those. If we offer three sets of wheels then there should be three sets of tires too. The decal sheet should feature the logos of the current aftermarket car parts suppliers - Borla, Pioneer, Recaro etc. versus Champion and the ones that the older generation can identify with. A set of heavily tinted windows could also be included as most "tuned" hot hatches have their windows tinted.  
    4) Possible alternative versions for the tooling. Alternate versions include the Focus SVT and a full on "Tuner" version possibly with a tie-in with an aftermarket supplier like Wings West. Alternately, the Wings West Focus Avenger could be included as the optional bodywork in the original ZX3 kit. These versions should be released as soon as financially possible. Although the "Tuner"/"Hot Hatch" segment is hot right now, we can't say when Ford will restyle the Focus. This body style will continue to be popular for some time after Ford restyles that car but that isn't likely to last forever.  
    5) How do you want the packaging? (box art, the packaging of the parts etc..) Box art should feature a photo of the actual car on the top. However, if we were to do the Wings West car, then it should be on the top. Alternate versions can be featured on the other sections of the box. These should be built up models showing the other ways that you can build the kit. All parts should be bagged.  The stock ZX3 in bright yellow would make for a striking box art car. The Wings West Focus is totally outrageous and should it be featured on the box top it should be as a drawing with the car smoking it's front tires from a stop.  
    6) Over-budget issues: Over budget? Ditch the aftermarket stuff . Modelers are a inventive sort who could and would buy Integra kits to scavenge parts out of to customize their Focus (Foki?). We can always put them into the SVT version.  John
  15. Luc Janssens added a post in a topic Okay, I moved the party and there's no voting, but there's likes, the rest basically stays the same, come up with one idea for a model kit and work it out   

    The following proposal was made in 2002, and was announced to be kitted a few weeks ago.
    1965 Ford F-100 (by Bob Core and Will S.)
    1) what subject would you kit, and why? 1965 Ford F-100 (short wide box). Last of the old pickup platforms that hasn't been kitted in the last 20 years.(well, there's the '57 thru '60 F-100 and it would work as well).  
    2) Set your target audience, decide on skill level, parts breakdown and overall design. The core (NPI) model hobbyists would buy it; the Wally-World crowd likes old pickup trucks; the rod/cruiser crowd also digs them (lowered with Aspen / Volare front ends). Skill 2, part count and engineering on par with the Revell '64/'65 Chevy pickup kits. Single version kit as well.  
    3) Do you want to include optional parts? name them, and why? No optional parts for the truck itself, but maybe a few accessories to put in the back like crates or yard tools, Throw in some bush bars and a rifle rack. Heck, even a Remington Pump Shotgun for the rack. The kinds of things someone would have put in the back of a new pickup in 1965. Maybe a circa 1965 Quarter Midget (simple, though!) and loading ramps to pay homage to the go-cart included in the old AMT annuals.
    4) Possible alternative versions for the tooling. After the initial run, blow out a really well detailed 4 WD setup to put underneath it. The whole 9 yards. Axle, X-fer Case, shafts,  white wagon style wheels with off road meats. This kit could become the Opel Blitz of half tons. short and long bed versions, with a custom flareside and lowered suspension, as well as a rep stock long bed. Kit-bash to your heart's content! (Pro-Street, In-the-weeds Street Machine, '60s custom, Bonneville push truck.)
    5) How do you want the packaging? (box art, the packaging of the parts etc..) See number three.