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74 members have voted

  1. 1. Parts packs

    • Yes
      70
    • No
      4
  2. 2. 2'n 1 kits

    • Yes
      71
    • No
      3


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I was reading a tread about not being able to swap the wheels/tire combo on a new kit, without some adapting of the mounting system.

So I'm wondering if you guys would like the idea, that each brand (Revell/Moebius/Round-2)

Offer include more building options in their kits?

If yes, what options would you prefer and why?

Please be specific and detailed in your reply, I wanna hear the grinding of the collective minds here in my neck of the woods.

;^)

To jump start this brainstorm session , I'm gonna list some ideas, which can be used as a base, feel free to add more......ideas, info..

This way we let the manufacturers know our preferences as enthusiasts, which I'm sure also will be appreciated by the novice builders and make them buy and build even more model kits, Ha!

-Extra wheel/tire combo, 60s-70s Street Machine look (brands?), Modern pro-Touring? (brands?)

-Engine and performance parts (period correct parts 50s, 60s, 70s?....what and brands) crate engines (brand and type)

-2 or 4 wheel-drive set ups (for trucks and vans (Marmon-Herrington set-up for 50s Ford pickups?)

-Big Rigs, bull/Roo bars, lights, wheel combo's ????

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Extra motor & trans options, like a base six with a three speed, or automatic, and an optional V-8 with optional four speed, or the same auto trans used behind the six, like a C-4 in a Ford, and a TH 350 in a Chevy, and options of base wheels and dog dish caps, or wheel covers and after market wheels for the optional tires.

Street rod kits could have a couple of different engine choices, like a vintage V8 for that group, or a more contemporary choice for the new style builders along with a complementary set up for tires and wheels. Rear end types could go with an older banjo Ford or a Ford 9 inch the banjo rear could have an open drive line set up so it would work with the parts for the 9 inch too interior could be a simple tuck and roll that wouldn't look out of place for either style of building, or for some vintage trucks and mid '30s-mid '50s cars, a dead stock setup, and a low rider package with chassis and under hood chrome, and separate suspension, with the lowered parts in show chrome and some more modern wheels and tires might actually be a popular choice, maybe the same idea with some big GM rides in the mid '80s, and give us a couple of mid '9Os Caddy's with stock body styles. These would go with the luxury car guys and the luxury low rider Gangsta group.

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I always loved the 2-n1 kits. The extra "custom" or "race" parts always excited me. All the parts that didn't get used went into my parts bin. To use Revells late model Shelby kits, you have a great looking model when you're finished but I'm disappointed because I used all the parts. There's none to throw in the parts bin.

I love having a choice of wheels/tires, and headers/manifolds, intake/carbs, shifters, steering wheels, hood scoops, stripes/decals. Race parts,

The list could go on, and I'm just thinking Muscle cars.

4x4's could have all kinds of options. Roll bars, winches, lights, grill guards etc...

Hot Rods could have endless parts, different engine/transmission combos, rear ends, seats, shifters, manifolds/blowers.

I love extra parts!

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The extra parts you don't use can be traded for parts you can use, extra stuff is always good

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It will never happen again by and large. Model maufacturers can sell more kits by offering them in diffrent versions versus selling them as 2 or 3 in 1 kits.

When going to a Burger joint, people rather super size then going back for an extra burger or fries.

;^)

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If the new kit is priced the same either way, to get the 2-in-1 then something on the basic kit will be lost or compromised. Would you prefer separate door handles and windshield wipers, or an extra set of wheels and tires?

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Luv the 2 in 1. The lack of parts spawned the aftermarket segment of our hobby. Which I think we are all greatful for.

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i have always loved the 3 in 1 kits....the extras one decides not to use on it are an incentive to buy another kit to use them on and that is good for business specially these days. Its also kind of like a thank you for buying the companies kit and or kits to many builders...if one has building options with a kit it sparks creativity and drive to build and buy more of them. There is a reason why 3 in 1 kits sell so well and are desired by most builders....they all got it right back in the 60s through mid 70s era in my opinion. Costs of kits will always go up nothing we can do about it so we might as well get a bit more for the money if we can.

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They say there are no dumb questions. But, this one maybe close. Of course 2-in-1 are good. Any choice, model building options is a good thing.

Scott

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Not only do I like the 2 n 1 kits, but, I also like the double kits, where you get 2 vehicles in one box, for example the Tony Nancy dragsters

some of those have become parts donors for other builds

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-Extra wheel/tire combo, 60s-70s Street Machine look (brands?), Modern pro-Touring? (brands?)

-Engine and performance parts (period correct parts 50s, 60s, 70s?....what and brands) crate engines (brand and type)

-2 or 4 wheel-drive set ups (for trucks and vans (Marmon-Herrington set-up for 50s Ford pickups?)

-Big Rigs, bull/Roo bars, lights, wheel combo's ????

Engine/performance: Parts pack with induction set-ups for Buick Nailhead,Chevy 348/409 and early 392 hemis would be cool. No blowers,just fuel injection and carb set ups in diffrent styles. Also hot rod headers and sidepipes.

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Multiple build-options are always better than only one. I have a large stash of swappable parts, but many modelers don't have that to draw on. To limit a builder to only one possible way to build a kit may tend to limit the enthusiasm of those just starting out, but who want to do some customization.

An obvious alternate engine choice for just about anything (included in a 2-in-one OR available as a parts-pack) would be the Chevy LS, with an appropriate 5 or 6 speed manual, or a 4L60E or 4L80E automatic. These engine / trans combos are extremely popular in the real world of car-building these days, and Revell, at least, already has nice tooling to represent the engines. These engines are also being fitted with carb manifolds and distributors in the real rod world (in place of the full electronic FI and ignition controls) for more retro installations, and tooling parts to represent this would be relatively easy.

Again, the Chevy LS engine is showing up in every imaginable form of real car these days, from early Corvettes to old Mustangs, '30s based hot-rods, Asian drifters, pro-touring rides, and even European resto-mods. It is the "smallblock Chevy" of the present, and it might be nice to see this particular reality reflected in scale availability.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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It will never happen again by and large. Model maufacturers can sell more kits by offering them in diffrent versions versus selling them as 2 or 3 in 1 kits.

If you look at the success of the Revell '32 Ford hits you can see why. It works and we still get all the options and different parts since all of these things, engines , wheels / tires interchange from kit to kit. :) A win, win, if you will. :lol:

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The MO these days seems to be to release separate single versions, and then after a few years, release a "2 in 1" version that includes ALL the parts.

Back in the Good Old Days, most kits weren't 2 in 1, they were marketed as 3 in 1--Stock, Custom, and Race. And there were often multiple Custom options, and sometimes both drag and oval or road Race parts, meaning some kits were actually 4 in 1, 5 in 1, even 6 in 1. All for $2.

Ah, the Good Old Days.

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The exception being no stock 32.

I always hoped Revell would release a full-fendered version of their nice '32 roadster, but with a stock-buildable option. Naturally, the frame and suspension would fit all the other Revell '32 kits as well.

And they might look at their OLD model-A chassis for inspiration. It's a true thing of beauty (though incessantly complained about as "fiddly"...which I don't get at all). The tooling is crisp, the parts are represented correctly (not softened blobs made up by someone who doesn't understand the workings), and it has two of the best front I-beam axles in the modeling world.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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AMT's old 3-in-1 are still the best. Stock, custom, and race. Or mix parts of all the three. Had more fun with these kits over the years.

Scott

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The exception being no stock 32.

Maybe we can hope ? :) That would certainly be a money maker to cap off a great series. :D WOW ! Four more kits. :lol:hqdefault.jpg1932ford3wcprest073013.jpg7377433022_f915476b7b_h.jpg1932-ford-models-b-and-18-6.jpg

Edited by Greg Myers

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The old MPC 1960 Vette is like a 6 in 1.....bought 3 and I don't care for Vettes!!!!

But make a kit a 3 in 1 or better ....I buy!

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The old MPC 1960 Vette is like a 6 in 1.....bought 3 and I don't care for Vettes!!!!

But make a kit a 3 in 1 or better ....I buy!

True, that and their '57 both (the original, not the flip-front so-called "Gasser").

I bought one of those last time they were out, planning to bash the front end with an AMT '62 to make a decent '62. Now that Revell has the nice '62 out, really no reason to do that. Now I'm thinking of bashing it with an AMT '62 to make a fairly good '61 (which might be a little easier than doing a '62).

Or I might just do the thing as a '60 drag car.

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2n1s are awesome, more parts the better, would like to see more stock wheels and tires in the kits. And interiors door panels!

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I fondly remember and loved the earlier 3-1 kits because, they gave the modeler multiple build options.

I certainly would love to to see multiple build option kit resurface. In fact AMT`s `64 Impala was a 2 in 1 "stock" and "low rider" kit and it was reasonably pricedarrow-10x10.png and is still a highly sort after kit.

Ace-Garageguy and Disabledarrow-10x10.png Modeler are correctarrow-10x10.png the extras parts one decides not to use are an incentive to buy another kit to use them on and that is good for businessarrow-10x10.png specially these days. And, in response to those who say that it will drive up Disablearrow-10x10.png Modeler hit the nail squarely on the head when he stated "Costs of kits will always go up." Weather they release a singlearrow-10x10.png model kit or a 2 in 1 or 3 in 1arrow-10x10.png kit.

In today's market hobbits most likely would opt for a Stock/Pro-Touring/Low-Rider 3 in 1arrow-10x10.png optioned kit. Or, a Stock/Drag/Street machine 3 in 1 optioned kit.

Like Ford Guy I love having a choice of race and custom parts like wheels tiresarrow-10x10.png, and headers/manifolds, intake/carbs, shifters, steering wheels, hood scoops etc.

Edited by 69NovaYenko

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I like 2 in 1 largely because my preferences are often not the most popular option. With the move towards single "custom" kits I've been left out where in the past many of these would have included a stock (or at least stock-ish) option, that isn't there when the kit is full on designed as a hotrod or whatever.

It has also allowed me to amass a fairly large parts box of custom items. Initially I thought I'd probably swap a pile of bits for a kit. Then I realized that even though I don't build traditional customs, some of these parts are rather useful for madmax style end of civilization subjects which I do kind of like.

Edited by Aaronw

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