Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum
Straightliner59

Model A Five-Window Coupe

Recommended Posts

I built a set of springs, for this thing. When I set the body and floorboard on the chassis, it was apparent that the springs, as they were, wouldn't be sturdy enough to support the weight of the model. I cut and bent some brass strip, to rectify the problem. Monogram's front crossmember looked too clunky, to me, so, I built one from Evergreen channel and .010" sheet. I got new fender arch panels cut and installed. I need to finish cleaning them up, and add the rolled strengthening ribs. The chassis is all cleaned up. I'm still trying to find a proper rearend center for it. If I don't, it should be simple enough to build one. As always questions, comments and critiques are welcome.

DSC_0001cr.jpg

DSC_0003cr.jpg

DSC_0005cr.jpg

DSC_0008cr.jpg

DSC_0010cr.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm getting the running gear sorta' sorted out. Here are the components that make up the rear brakes/wheel assemblies. The backing plates are, maybe from the early '80s release of Revell's T-bucket. I can't recall who cast the finned drums. They fit nicely together with the backing plates. I made the hubs from Plastruct tube. The other photo shows them stacked together. The rear axle center section is from AMT's '29 Roadster kit. I'm not sure where the axle tubes came from. They were plated, until I tossed them in the Purple lake. They are very nice. I suspect they may be Revell.

 

DSC_0001cr.jpg

DSC_0003cr.jpg

DSC_0005cr.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, bobthehobbyguy said:

Its amazing projects take control of how they want to be done.

Thanks, Bob! They certainly do. This one has! 😁

Edited by Straightliner59

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A funny thing happened, on the way to a quickie build. I started thinking about the engine, and decided that I wasn't very fond of the molded on oil filler tube, starter, etc. So...now, I have this. I cut everything off the engine, above the oil pan, and began replacing it with Evergreen  stock. I will also use the kit's timing cover. The plastic rod in these photos will be used to make the cylinders. I also shortened the front spring, and lengthened the axle. I wanted to use a beam axle, but, couldn't find one I liked, so, i went with this tube axle. As always, questions, chritiques and comments are welcome! thanks for lookin'.

DSC_0001cr.jpg

DSC_0003cr.jpg

DSC_0004cr.jpg

DSC_0005cr.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the cylinders cut, and have begun work on the starter. The engine-turned aluminum is the side cover, but, I may make another one that has some relief detail. It will get bolt heads, of course. I still need to make the head. I'll likely go with a Winfield. Does anybody know the best green to use on one of these early flatties? Questions, comments and critiques always welcome!

DSC_0003cr.jpg

DSC_0004cr.jpg

DSC_0005cr.jpg

DSC_0006cr.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While waiting for paint to cure on the Firebird, I worked on some stuff for this project. I am really liking the look of the wheels from the Heller BMW 328. They fit better with the rear suspension than the '37 pickup's wheels do. I will probably make new centers for these wheels (I made a mold), with detail for five lugs. Apparently, there are at least a thousand ways to attach the spring to the axle. If it sits low enough, I will mount the bracket where it's shown in the photo, If I need another couple or three inches, I will move it around, to the rear of the backing plate. Also visible is the area I cut out of the rear crossmember, to allow the spring to sit higher in the chassis. I didn't/don't want to "z" the frame. I made an aluminum side cover for the engine. It looked pretty lifeless, just as it was, so, I used a set of wide-jawed pliers to put a gentle fold down the center of its length, then used them to re-flatten the end. I still need to mark it, and drill it for mounting bolts. Comments, questions and critiques are always welcome! Thanks fer lookin'!

DSC_0001cr.jpg

DSC_0018cr.jpg

DSC_0024cr.jpg

DSC_0026cr.jpg

DSC_0028cr.jpg

DSC_0029cr.jpg

DSC_0030cr.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How cool is that to see you working in my wheel house. 😎 I'm looking forward to seeing you apply your not-insignificant skills in fabrication and historical research to this type of project. I was traveling in early September when you started this so I missed the send-off. As I read through the posts I thought of the very nice 4-bangers from the Monogram-then-Revell '29-'30 Pickup/Sedan kits, but then you went and scratched your own! LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, David G. said:

I really like where you're going with this.

David G.

Thanks, David! I appreciate it!

14 hours ago, Bernard Kron said:

How cool is that to see you working in my wheel house. 😎 I'm looking forward to seeing you apply your not-insignificant skills in fabrication and historical research to this type of project. I was traveling in early September when you started this so I missed the send-off. As I read through the posts I thought of the very nice 4-bangers from the Monogram-then-Revell '29-'30 Pickup/Sedan kits, but then you went and scratched your own! LOL

It's fun, in this wheelhouse! I've wanted and old style hot rod, for a long time, and one night, I opened the closet, and the little coupe called to me! Interestingly, the wire front wheels originally came out of this very kit. I'd shuffled them to several different projects/ideas, over the years. I first built them over 20 years ago! Now, they come home to stay. I have the Revell Woodie and the "Rat Rod" release of Revell's venerable roadster pickup. The engine in the Woodie is pretty nice! I was going to keep this simple, and use the engine from this kit, but, I hated the oil filler tube, and knew it would be way too much hassle to clean its remains from between the cylinders, and, off I went! I think I will make the oil line on the right side of the engine with copper line and brass fittings, just for appearance' sake. What would you recommend for green paint for the Engine? I think I want to go with that early Ford green. Thanks for your comments, Bernard!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have decided to use the Beemer wheels. I made a mold of the Heller piece, because I only found one of them. Once they were cast, the wheels just fell through the tire. I added a strip of Plastruct .030" half-round to the perimeter of the wheel, which, I think looks better than without it. I will get to the hobby shop in the next couple of weeks, and will pick up some .020" half-round, and try that, as well. Also, slightly visible is the milled indent for a hub. This one is 1/4", but, in order for it to fit the bolt pattern, I will go with 5/16" for the finished wheel. Right now, I am experimenting, working toward a master that I can make a final mold from, and have five lug disc wheel.  The first photo illustrates the half-round,applied to the rim. The next features the new wheel, as well as the original Heller part, and the casting, without the flange, which is clearly too small. Finally, we have the modified casting alongside the "straight-from-the-mold" casting.

DSC_0009cr.jpg

DSC_0010cr.jpg

DSC_0013cr.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/14/2019 at 9:54 AM, Bernard Kron said:

As I read through the posts I thought of the very nice 4-bangers from the Monogram-then-Revell '29-'30 Pickup/Sedan kits, but then you went and scratched your own! LOL

As I was  looking through my photo files, I came across these pics of a speedster I started working on many years ago. These really are beautiful little flatties!

100_3648web.jpg

100_3649web.jpg

100_3651web.jpg

100_3652web.jpg

100_3653web.jpg

100_3655web.jpg

100_3656web.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/26/2019 at 6:50 PM, Straightliner59 said:

I have the cylinders cut, and have begun work on the starter. The engine-turned aluminum is the side cover, but, I may make another one that has some relief detail. It will get bolt heads, of course. I still need to make the head. I'll likely go with a Winfield. Does anybody know the best green to use on one of these early flatties? Questions, comments and critiques always welcome!

DSC_0003cr.jpg

DSC_0004cr.jpg

DSC_0005cr.jpg

DSC_0006cr.jpg

I like to paint the engine and transmission the same color as the body as using black hides all of the extra work you are doing here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, misterNNL said:

I like to paint the engine and transmission the same color as the body as using black hides all of the extra work you are doing here.

Tom, maybe I like black, because it hides all my imperfections! 😁 Somewhere, I've seen some of these painted green, I thought. If not, I guess green is a part of my vision for this engine. I'm thinking a medium forest or olive green, maybe.

Here are the first shots with the header in place, and the engine between the rails, with the body on. I will have to modify the pipes, so that they will clear the body. The stance isn't finalized here, the chassis is just sitting on blocks, to provide something close.

I was absolutely sold on the BMW wheels...until I used a punch and dapping block on some tooling aluminum, to do this:

image.png.0073b68926e99fba79078bc1edaf9343.png

The aluminum is scratched, and has tiny dents in it. That's just the look I want for this car.

image.png.6aab6e28647975a772e2a845eb23e34c.png

I have made three different centers for the Beemer wheels:

image.png.3d2de42eeddefea22c00b1f3c464871f.png

image.png.778eaff6b50414692418f0ce36fd849f.png

While I used the rotary table and mill to make these centers, when I was finishing them, I used a tip that Ace (I think) mentioned that bears repeating:

A few small milling bits can be handy to have around, even if you don't own a mill. A 1/16" ball-ended mill was used by hand to cut the reliefs in the disc, below.

Small flat end mills can be used to square the bottom of an indentation. End mills with a 1/8" shank can be inserted into a pin vise.

image.png.fd71f670c0cfacf6aa1884aa4950a3e7.png

image.png.e34ccc2f3377db54eb3ebbf0bc99c9cb.png

Lastly, this is probably my least favorite, because I think it looks too modern, for where I want this project to go.

image.png.023f7e65a341aaeb6b4ca6a4f63db7c8.png

image.png.d542d9f1af0aad71873910cc09be9a6c.png

Anybody care to help me decide which of the four wheels to go with? I would very much appreciate everyone's feedback! Thanks for looking at this.

Edited by Straightliner59

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree in your preferred wheel choice. The military style with the openings around the rim edge is the most vintage look. The hub cap style looks like something swiped from a parked police cruiser outside a dounut shop.:)   I will gladly send a couple photos of some of my speedster engine color choices if you PM my your email address. Either way this project is surely headed in the right direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Straightliner59 said:

As I was  looking through my photo files, I came across these pics of a speedster I started working on many years ago. These really are beautiful little flatties!

100_3648web.jpg

100_3649web.jpg

100_3651web.jpg

100_3652web.jpg

100_3653web.jpg

100_3655web.jpg

100_3656web.jpg

Wow! The work on this chassis is incredible.  Here's to showing the mere kit assemblers what goes into creating a real model!   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent work, Daniel - I love the direction you’re going!  

Regarding the green color used by Ford from 1928 through the end of the forties on the 4 and 8 cylinder flatheads:  you can spend a lot of money on authentic Ford Engine Green, but Walmart has Rustoleum Hunt Club Green #7944 which is a dead ringer at 1/5 the price.  A fair backup is Krylon Hunter Green #53502.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Danno said:

Excellent work, Daniel - I love the direction you’re going!  

Regarding the green color used by Ford from 1928 through the end of the forties on the 4 and 8 cylinder flatheads:  you can spend a lot of money on authentic Ford Engine Green, but Walmart has Rustoleum Hunt Club Green #7944 which is a dead ringer at 1/5 the price.  A fair backup is Krylon Hunter Green #53502.

Thank you for your kind  words, Danno! The less expensive, the better, in my book. I'll be picking that up, next time I'm at Walmart.

 

5 hours ago, Tom Geiger said:

Wow! The work on this chassis is incredible.  Here's to showing the mere kit assemblers what goes into creating a real model!   

Thank you, Tom. It's one of those things you mentioned the other day, about trying stuff, just to see if you can do it. That's where this chassis came from. Somewhere, I have a '41 Plymouth chassis started, too.

 

5 hours ago, MeatMan said:

Awesome scratchbuilding!

Thanks, Dennis. Thanks for looking in!

 

8 hours ago, misterNNL said:

I agree in your preferred wheel choice. The military style with the openings around the rim edge is the most vintage look. The hub cap style looks like something swiped from a parked police cruiser outside a dounut shop.:)   I will gladly send a couple photos of some of my speedster engine color choices if you PM my your email address. Either way this project is surely headed in the right direction.

I sent a PM, Tom. I love that description, regarding the hubcaps--perfect! Thanks for your feedback and for checking it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been working on a couple of things: First, I drilled the engine side cover to accept brass model RR bolts. As you can see, the bit (it was in the Dremel, mounted in the drill press) skipped in a few spots. On one of the holes, I was obviously a bit too aggressive, and ended up with an out-of-place hole. I will have to figure a way to disguise that! I also mage a pair of castings forthe  brakes from a two-piece mold I made. I didn't do much cleanup on these, other than to sand off the mold lines. After that, I just washed them, and shot them with Testor's metalizers--stainless for the drum, titanium for the backing plate. I'm pretty happy with the way they came out. Questions, comments, critiques always welcome! Thanks for looking!

DSC_0002cr.jpg

DSC_0005cr.jpg

DSC_0007cr.jpg

DSC_0009cr.jpg

Edited by Straightliner59

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got the reinforcing ribs added to the wheel "cutouts". Also mounted the spring brackets to the backing plates. The Winfield head is coming along...

DSC_0001cr.jpg

DSC_0004cr.jpg

DSC_0005cr.jpg

DSC_0008cr.jpg

DSC_0012cr.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/20/2019 at 6:34 AM, Straightliner59 said:

I built a set of springs, for this thing. When I set the body and floorboard on the chassis, it was apparent that the springs, as they were, wouldn't be sturdy enough to support the weight of the model. I cut and bent some brass strip, to rectify the problem. Monogram's front crossmember looked too clunky, to me, so, I built one from Evergreen channel and .010" sheet. I got new fender arch panels cut and installed. 

DSC_0008cr.jpg

 

You may be pleased to know that your spring construction technique inspired me to try some myself. I'm pretty happy with the results, and they prove quite strong. in fact, I ended up scratchbuilding the entire frame.  thank you for sharing, it motivated at least one modeler to challenge himself. 😁

1571656985700

1572520821030

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎10‎/‎19‎/‎2019 at 10:07 PM, Straightliner59 said:

As I was  looking through my photo files, I came across these pics of a speedster I started working on many years ago. These really are beautiful little flatties!

100_3648web.jpg

100_3649web.jpg

100_3651web.jpg

100_3652web.jpg

100_3653web.jpg

100_3655web.jpg

100_3656web.jpg

I have used those quarter elliptical springs myself on a couple speedsters. Nice detail

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Mr. Metallic said:

You may be pleased to know that your spring construction technique inspired me to try some myself. I'm pretty happy with the results, and they prove quite strong. in fact, I ended up scratchbuilding the entire frame.  thank you for sharing, it motivated at least one modeler to challenge himself. 😁

Thank you, Craig! I am always happy to know when I can inspire someone, or just have an idea that helps them move a project along. Nice work, too, sir!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...