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Mounting wheelbacks: glue solid or free spin?

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When mounting wheelbacks to the axles what's the preferred way?  Glue the wheelbacks solid so the wheels/tires don't spin or allow the wheels/tires to spin freely?

I've mounted wheelbacks on a few models so the wheels/tires can spin but the wheels don't always sit straight.  

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Personally, I get everything straight and square and then glue them in place. Had a finished model I was fond off roll off of a shelf once and shatter into a billion pieces. Fortunately I was able to repair it but from there on I glued my wheels solid. Starting with the one that took a tumble! I think of it as a parking brake for the shelf, lol. 

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I do it both ways. Just depends. Neither way is right or wrong. 

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I do both.  For Box Stock, I let them turn.  For kit-bash, it could be totally different methods of mounting, so glue and then what is really important to me, flatten the contact patch to avoid the toy look.  If tires still turn, that flat spot always ends up everywhere but down.  To me, that flat spot is more important than turning wheels.  Cats like turning wheels, just sayin'. 🙀

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5 hours ago, 89AKurt said:

  To me, that flat spot is more important than turning wheels.

This is my primary reason for gluing the wheels solid. Flat spotting the contact patch gives the model the appearance of weight and substance, and greatly improves realism. Gluing the wheels solid also provides the opportunity to get the wheels on nice and straight..., or create a little (intentional) negative camber, if it's appropriate. With the exception of wire axels, I have yet to see a model kit on which the rolling wheels were perfectly square. For me, shelf appearance is much more important than rolling wheels.

To each their own, of course. Some guys like to build exactly as the kit was intended by the designer, which includes rolling wheels, and that's cool. A nice thing about this hobby is that there are very few real rules.

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I don't flat-spot my model car tires, but I totally get it, because I ALWAYS do that on model airplanes and laugh at others' models "on tippy-toes." Main reason I don't do it on cars is that I haven't found a good way to accurately flat-spot either solid or hollow vinyl. So how do you guys do that? :unsure:

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I always glue the wheels to the axels for a couple of reasons. #1 So they can be positioned parallel to each other. #2 So the model will not roll of the shelve or display area. Now something I learned reading the information provided by others is that I've been building for years and never thought of "Flat Spotting" the tires to simulate a tire under the weight of a real car. This could also compensate for any slight difference in ride height of the model. Makes perfect sense, just wonder why I never thought of it. Thank you.    

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My motto is "Nice models should NEVER roll".  Too many things can go wrong such as what Tom mentioned...........rolling off the shelf and ruining it forever. Even if it's in a case, I'm not crazy about them rolling around as than can lead to paint chips or chipped chrome. No, I'd rather have them sitting stiff as a board, than rolling all over the place.

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1 hour ago, Bainford said:

[...] Flat spotting the contact patch gives the model the appearance of weight and substance, and greatly improves realism. [...]

Exactly!

1 hour ago, Snake45 said:

I don't flat-spot my model car tires, but I totally get it, because I ALWAYS do that on model airplanes and laugh at others' models "on tippy-toes." Main reason I don't do it on cars is that I haven't found a good way to accurately flat-spot either solid or hollow vinyl. So how do you guys do that? :unsure:

I use the Dremel with sanding drum, go across the tire while holding it so it doesn't spin. 🤣  Sort of hollow the flat too, so the contact is at the edges, if it's at all rounded still, won't be convincing.  Then lay flat a sheet of rough sandpaper on the bench, do the front wheels, then back, sideways (again a reason to glue axles 🤣).  I've had the dreaded tripod, so can fix it by doing the offending corner more.  Fake it until you make it.

1 hour ago, Tom Geiger said:

And you don’t want models rolling off the shelf!  

Ever hear of a level? 😜  I so agree with this statement!

37 minutes ago, espo said:

[...] Now something I learned reading the information provided by others is that I've been building for years and never thought of "Flat Spotting" the tires to simulate a tire under the weight of a real car. This could also compensate for any slight difference in ride height of the model. Makes perfect sense, just wonder why I never thought of it. Thank you.    

😁 Welcome!  Perhaps I should start a specific topic about this.
1059622881_getoffmylawn.jpg.cdf3fc0749b4cab9c25d755c9d78c6be.jpg

34 minutes ago, MrObsessive said:

My motto is "Nice models should NEVER roll".  Too many things can go wrong such as what Tom mentioned...........rolling off the shelf and ruining it forever. Even if it's in a case, I'm not crazy about them rolling around as than can lead to paint chips or chipped chrome. No, I'd rather have them sitting stiff as a board, than rolling all over the place.

Mine is LET'S ROLL!  😎

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1 minute ago, 89AKurt said:

Exactly!

I use the Dremel with sanding drum, go across the tire while holding it so it doesn't spin. 🤣  Sort of hollow the flat too, so the contact is at the edges, if it's at all rounded still, won't be convincing.  Then lay flat a sheet of rough sandpaper on the bench, do the front wheels, then back, sideways (again a reason to glue axles 🤣).  I've had the dreaded tripod, so can fix it by doing the offending corner more.  Fake it until you make it.

Ever hear of a level? 😜  I so agree with this statement!

😁 Welcome!  Perhaps I should start a specific topic about this.
1059622881_getoffmylawn.jpg.cdf3fc0749b4cab9c25d755c9d78c6be.jpg

Mine is LET'S ROLL!  😎

Kurt, your picture is making me laugh at myself right now. Not ten minuets ago this was me on our back deck trying to encourage the Geese that they should stay on the lake and off our grass. Mine is a '177 so it just makes life a little uncomfortable for them, but they're slow learners. 

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9 minutes ago, 89AKurt said:

Ever hear of a level? 😜  I so agree with this statement!

I remember someone, might have been on this board, who brought their brand new build outside to photograph. A slight breeze moved the base they had the car on and it quickly rolled off to it demise!

Edited by Tom Geiger

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14 minutes ago, espo said:

Kurt, your picture is making me laugh at myself right now. Not ten minuets ago this was me on our back deck trying to encourage the Geese that they should stay on the lake and off our grass. Mine is a '177 so it just makes life a little uncomfortable for them, but they're slow learners. 

🤣

12 minutes ago, Tom Geiger said:

I remember someone, might have been on this board, who brought their brand new build outside to photograph. A slight breeze moved the base they had the car on and it quickly rolled off to it demise!

😱 There you go!  Reminds me, someone told me about just getting their car from the paint shop, parked way out at the edge of the grocery store parking lot.  When they came out, car was not in the same spot, but over there, totaled by a dumb***.  That's the full scale version.

I started the Flat spotting tires topic.  I made sure to search before posting, just watch, someone will dredge up this topic from the bowels of this forum. 😑

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Even back when I was kid and set my models on whatever piece of furniture was available, shelves that were hung by eyesight, I've never had a model roll off. I honestly don't see how it can happen. A shelf would have to be way out of level for a model to just roll off. 

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58 minutes ago, espo said:

Kurt, your picture is making me laugh at myself right now. Not ten minuets ago this was me on our back deck trying to encourage the Geese that they should stay on the lake and off our grass. Mine is a '177 so it just makes life a little uncomfortable for them, but they're slow learners. 

geese dont learn, but they do remember who to drop gifts on....

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I glue them unless they are too tight to roll. If its a wire axle i give it a rough up with 220 and put some superglue on it before fitting as i've had them not stick without sanding

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24 minutes ago, Plowboy said:

Even back when I was kid and set my models on whatever piece of furniture was available, shelves that were hung by eyesight, I've never had a model roll off. I honestly don't see how it can happen. A shelf would have to be way out of level for a model to just roll off. 

My previous house was a duplex where I had neighbors and I could sometimes hear them through the walls. They were a young couple and let's just say they were rather "portly". One of them went running through the house (maybe after their toddler son), when the vibrations (shaking actually) sent my rolling '61 T-Bird promo model off the shelf and onto the floor! 😮

This was the case EVEN when I had a dime in front one of the tires to keep it from rolling. THANKFULLY the model despite pushing 60 years old, fell without a scratch and I made sure that it was a bit more "secure" the next time. No worries about that now as the house I'm in stands alone, so the only "shaking" will come from me walking too hard which really never happens! :P
 

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Whatever is required for a particular build to get the model to "sit" correctly.

If I can do it without any extra effort and have them turn, I will.

If they're sloppy or loose, they get glued.

 

Mine all go into individual display cases, so I don't worry about them rolling away. ;)

 

 

 

Steve

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4 hours ago, Snake45 said:

I don't flat-spot my model car tires, but I totally get it, because I ALWAYS do that on model airplanes and laugh at others' models "on tippy-toes." Main reason I don't do it on cars is that I haven't found a good way to accurately flat-spot either solid or hollow vinyl. So how do you guys do that? :unsure:

I have an old Wen Hobby Centre like the one pictured. The PTO coming out of the end is intended for a cable driven rotary tool. But you can remove that and fit an aluminium disc about 2.5 inches dia to the end of the exposed shaft. Glue 320 grit sand paper to the disc. The fuzzy line drawing below shows an adjustable table that fits to the side via the two screw holes shown in the photograph. This little table, set 90* to the sanding disc, makes the perfect device for flat spotting tires.

1886365314_wen4.jpg.fff1bc25b36249d1097b7ed4f17279ed.jpgwen3.png.0c1bc4251c280d885a6fb44e22bf09e3.png

wen.png

Edited by Bainford

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I glue the wheels in place but on those kits with workable steering leave that to work.

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