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To glove or not to glove

29 posts in this topic

Posted

I know its sloppy, stupid,lazy but I spray paint in my bare hands. I've found that Goo Gone works great to remove reasonably fresh spray paint from your(my) hands. Give it a shot!!!

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Posted

Gloves (at Harbor Freight) are probably as cheap as Goo Gone, and a lot less messy.

There might be health risks involved by spraying paint on your skin...

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Posted

I use gloves also, much cheaper than Doctors & hospitals

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Posted

Gloves also protect against contamination by the oils and other things that could be on your hands. I would prefer to use bare hands since it's cooler but there's a good reason for it.

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Posted

I use gloves when spraying paint (rattle cans).  I got tired of having to wipe my hand with paint thinner after painting.  As Ray and Al said, gloves are certainly cheap enough... and sometimes I'll even grab a handful from my Dr's. examining room while I'm waiting for him to come in.

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Posted (edited)

Gloves! I use 'em when I handle glass and chrome parts, also. Saves on smudges that would have to be polished off later.

Sometimes I'll stick my holding hand in a plastic grocery bag when I spray paint.

Edited by Dodge Driver

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Posted (edited)

When I owned my body shop, I tried to use gloves, but they drove me nuts by sweating inside them, and just didn't feel comfortable. Bear in mind that I was a Paramedic for years after that and HAD to wear them.........but I didn't have to LIKE it! I do not wear them to paint now, as I have issues with my hands and wearing them lessens my sensitivity I have, and so, I get paint on my hands.........and have been doing so for about 50+ years. I ain't dead yet, but it IS recommended that you do wear them. At the very least, it can prevent your hands from drying and cracking due to exposure to the solvents. Safety is always a good idea. If you are going to wear gloves, make sure you don't have a latex allergy if they are latex, and for painting, stay away from the powdered ones.

Edited by redneckrigger

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Posted

I will assume that if you do not wear gloves, then you do not wear a respirator. Both should be required when spraying paint. I wear both of mine and end up sweaty, but healthy, when finished.

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Posted

I will assume that if you do not wear gloves, then you do not wear a respirator. Both should be required when spraying paint. I wear both of mine and end up sweaty, but healthy, when finished.

Exactly.

There are components in paint that are absorbed through your skin that CAN (not necessarily WILL) have long term adverse (bad) health effects.

Cleaning hands with solvent products to get paint off is also not all that great an idea, and going around with paint on your hands makes you look like a 5-year-old.

Any grocery or drug store will have latex or vinyl examination gloves for about $5 for 50, so that's 10 cents for each glove. Pretty cheap considering they save time you would have to spend cleaning up, and save you from being exposed to potentially harmful chemicals. If you're REALLY cost-conscious, they can usually be used several times, if you let them dry out between uses.

If you're really OPPOSED to using gloves, you can attach the parts or bodies you're spraying to some sort of handle, easily made from paint sticks, wire hangers, etc., that can get the part to be painted far enough away from your hands so you don't spray them directly, anyway.

 

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Posted

Glove on left hand that holds parts.  Right hand holds the airbrush.

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Posted

Glove on left hand that holds parts.  Right hand holds the airbrush.

Actually, that's pretty much what I do. Excellent reminder.  :D

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Posted (edited)

I as well do that a lot, glove on the left hand, right hand is bare and holding the painting device.

But really,  I use gloves pretty much all the time,   its not that much of an expense to be honest, I get my box of 100 latex gloves from WalMart that are located in the hardware section( not the ones from the medical section) I think box is $9, they are cheap , tear/rip apart easy, but that is ok, I am not using them at the med level.

If you really want to be cheapskate, you can buy the dish washing gloves, the ones that you can reuse, you can buy the WalMart brand for like $1.

 

 

Edited by martinfan5

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Posted

Glove on left hand that holds parts.  Right hand holds the airbrush.

Same here.

So that box of 50 latex gloves for $3.00 will last me for 100 uses.

Probably actually 5 or 6 times that many uses because I don't throw them away after each paint session.

I can get probably 5 or 6 sessions out of one glove.

Well worth the money.

 

Steve

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Posted

I stick my bodies on an old quart beer bottle for painting. For decades I held the bottle in my bare hand but lately have gotten tired of painting my hand. I don't use gloves but I HAVE starting putting my hand in a gray Walmart plastic bag, the kind you drag 10 or 15 of home every week when you grocery shop. Works great! Use once, throw away, cost: $0.00.

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Posted

Never used to give it much thought, but lately I have been using them, if for nothing else to keep my hands paint free. Got tired of multi colored fingers, lol.

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Posted

I've always used a disposable glove on the hand I hold the part with. Make sure to dispose of the glove at the end of the session though and start with a new one.

I once reused a glove I'd had on the day before and started to get crud in the paint which turned out to be bits of paint flaking off the old glove

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Posted

I've always used a disposable glove on the hand I hold the part with. Make sure to dispose of the glove at the end of the session though and start with a new one.

I once reused a glove I'd had on the day before and started to get crud in the paint which turned out to be bits of paint flaking off the old glove

I re-use mine all of the time.

After a few sessions, the paint will begin to crack & flake off, but it doesn't need to be tossed if it only has a little primer over spray on it.

Just a little common sense will tell you if it's ready to be discarded.

 

Steve

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Posted

I always use gloves for modeling or anything around the house where I can get potentially grubby.   I like clean nails, and got to protect my moneymakers...(since I am a software engineer, I do spend a lot of time typing on a computer keyboard)..

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Posted

There are often times when I CAN'T wear gloves, working on some particularly delicate 1:1 machinery, where a very fine sense of touch is required.

In those cases, I've come to rely on this stuff. Works a treat, and makes everything wash off with water (Lava soap helps, or some kind of scrubbing hand-cleaner).

It PREVENTS dirt and grime from getting under your nails or getting embedded in your skin. Non-greasy after you work it in.

BUT...you DON'T want to touch a model prior to painting with this stuff on your hands.

Image result for invisible glove

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Posted

Glove it.

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Posted

It really depends upon the paint, but here is something to consider.  Have you ever used acetone to clean your hands and after a couple of seconds that that weird taste in your mouth?  Well that the the chemical going through your skin and through your blood stream to your mouth.  Same thing with paint.  Your skin is a semipermeable membrane and some very bad things can get through it and mess up your liver, brain and kidneys over time.  If you are young now and don't protect those organs, you may be lucky to live long enough to regret it.  In that respect it is a little like tobacco.  No noticeable effect from this exposure today or maybe the next, but 20 or 30 years down the road you may wish you hadn't take a little bit of care now. 

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Posted

There's an old joke about three automotive engineers standing at the sinks in the mens room.   The first one says, "At Fiat we do everything with vigor. I wash my hands ferociously with the soap, rinse and soap again."  The second one replies, "At Volkswagen we do everything with precision, I wash my hands carefully making sure I've soaped every part."  The third engineer replies, "At Mercedes we don't pee on our hands."

From some of the descriptions here of the "holding hand", I'm picturing people holding up their model body on their fist!  I use an eXacto paint stand, so I don't put my hand into the stream of paint.  All my smaller parts are either on pins, tooth picks or are taped to Styrofoam blocks.  I don't get paint on my hands.

 

 

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Posted

There's an old joke about three automotive engineers standing at the sinks in the mens room.   The first one says, "At Fiat we do everything with vigor. I wash my hands ferociously with the soap, rinse and soap again."  The second one replies, "At Volkswagen we do everything with precision, I wash my hands carefully making sure I've soaped every part."  The third engineer replies, "At Mercedes we don't pee on our hands."

From some of the descriptions here of the "holding hand", I'm picturing people holding up their model body on their fist!  I use an eXacto paint stand, so I don't put my hand into the stream of paint.  All my smaller parts are either on pins, tooth picks or are taped to Styrofoam blocks.  I don't get paint on my hands.

 

 

I use stands, paint cans & jars, tooth picks, wooden skewers with alligator clips, nearly anything that seems necessary to hold the part, but I still hold whatever device I'm using in my hand & some over spray is almost always inevitable.

I still wear a glove on the holding hand.

 

Steve

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Posted

For most of my junior high and high school years, the top part of my left hand was painted some wild color--candy red, metalflake green, and so forth. My Mom eventually gave up even asking me to try to wash it off before dinner. :D

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